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Home > Press > A closer look at life: X-ray microscopy hits the sweet spot for chemical and elemental imaging: Berkeley Lab research at AAAS Meeting

Abstract:
In perhaps no other scientific field does the adage "form follows function" hold more true than in biology, especially the biology of living cells, which is why our knowledge of cells starts with imaging. Optical microscopy is limited by low spatial resolution - about 200 nanometers, and electron microscopy is limited by the poor penetration of electrons and the requirement that it be performed in a vacuum, which means cells must be sectioned off into tissue-thin slices and dehydrated. X-ray microscopy bridges the resolution gap between optic and electron microscopy, combining the best features of both to hit the sweet spot for chemical and elemental imaging.

A closer look at life: X-ray microscopy hits the sweet spot for chemical and elemental imaging: Berkeley Lab research at AAAS Meeting

Berkeley, CA | Posted on February 18th, 2013

"Advances in X-ray sources, detectors, instrumentation and computing power are transforming X-ray microscopy from a scientific curiosity practiced by a few specialists, to a widely available form of high resolution imaging," says Janos Kirz, scientific advisor for Lawrence Berkeley National Lab's Advanced Light Source, a synchrotron radiation source optimized for soft x-ray and ultraviolet light.

"State-of-the-art X-ray microscopes can be used to create three-dimensional images with elemental and/or chemical sensitivity," Kirz says. "Some instruments are also capable of creating movies, or providing stop-motion or flash images of cells and proteins in their natural hydrated state."

Kirz, who pioneered the development of soft x-ray microscopy and spectromicroscopy, will describe 2-D and 3-D x-ray chemical imaging of biological systems in a presentation at the 2013 AAAS annual meeting in Boston titled "Chemical and Elemental Imaging with X-Ray Microscopy." His talk is part of the panel session titled "Visualizing Chemistry: Seeing Another Dimension of Plants and Animals," which is scheduled for February 15, 1:00 PM-2:30 PM in Room 309 of the Hynes Convention Center.

Kirz now holds the title of Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Stony Brook University.

Friday, February 15, 1:00 PM-2:30 PM Room 309, Hynes Convention Center

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Contacts:
Jon Weiner

510-486-4014

Copyright © DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

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