Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Invisible tool enables new quantum experiments

The three pulsed laser gratings flash for only a few nanosceconds in the experiment. (Copyright: J. Rodewald/QNP/University of Vienna)
The three pulsed laser gratings flash for only a few nanosceconds in the experiment.

(Copyright: J. Rodewald/QNP/University of Vienna)

Abstract:
Experiments on the quantum wave nature have enabled researchers to precisely measure tiny forces and displacements as well as to shed light onto the unexplored zone between the microscopic realm of quantum physics and our everyday world.

Invisible tool enables new quantum experiments

Vienna, Austria | Posted on February 11th, 2013

Matter wave interferometry has a long standing tradition at the University of Vienna, where the first quantum interference of large molecules has already been observed in 1999. Nowadays scientists are hunting down evidence for the quantum mechanical behavior of increasingly complex constituents of matter. This is done in experiments in which the flying of each particle seems to obtain information about distinct places in space, which are inaccessible according to classical physics.

Synchronised laser flashes for quantum interferometry

The quantum nanophysics team around Markus Arndt of the University of Vienna has now established a novel way of manipulating massive particles: the researchers use nanosecond long flashes of laser light to create gratings, three of which form a closed-path interferometer. This scheme allows creating quantum mechanical superposition states, which we do not observe in our macroscopic environment.

When precisely synchronized, the fleeting light structures form a device freed from many constraints that limited the measurement precision in earlier machines. "Interferometry in the time-domain with pulsed light gratings will become a central element of quantum experiments with nanoparticles" states Philipp Haslinger who is the first author of the paper.

Viennese prototype with powerful universality

Five students from the University of Vienna have been planning and setting up the device over the past years. The developed prototype is one of a kind: for the first time it allows to investigate the quantum wave nature not only of single molecules, but also of clusters of molecules. During an experiment these particles line up for few nanoseconds in a periodic nanopattern. This structure may serve as a "nanoruler" which enables the detection of tiny external perturbations as well as the precise measurement of small forces and fields.

This project has been supported within the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) and the Austrian Ministry of Science (BMWF). The experiments were performed within the Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, VCQ, at the Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Philipp Haslinger

43-142-775-1173

Copyright © University of Vienna

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Physics

New pathway to valleytronics January 27th, 2015

Visualizing interacting electrons in a molecule: Scientists at Aalto University and the University of Zurich have succeeded in directly imaging how electrons interact within a single molecule January 26th, 2015

News and information

New pathway to valleytronics January 27th, 2015

Stomach acid-powered micromotors get their first test in a living animal January 27th, 2015

Entanglement on a chip: Breakthrough promises secure communications and faster computers January 27th, 2015

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

New pathway to valleytronics January 27th, 2015

Nanoshuttle wear and tear: It's the mileage, not the age January 26th, 2015

Visualizing interacting electrons in a molecule: Scientists at Aalto University and the University of Zurich have succeeded in directly imaging how electrons interact within a single molecule January 26th, 2015

The latest fashion: Graphene edges can be tailor-made: Rice University theory shows it should be possible to tune material's properties January 24th, 2015

Discoveries

New pathway to valleytronics January 27th, 2015

Stomach acid-powered micromotors get their first test in a living animal January 27th, 2015

Entanglement on a chip: Breakthrough promises secure communications and faster computers January 27th, 2015

Nanoshuttle wear and tear: It's the mileage, not the age January 26th, 2015

Announcements

New pathway to valleytronics January 27th, 2015

Entanglement on a chip: Breakthrough promises secure communications and faster computers January 27th, 2015

Detection of Heavy Metals in Samples with Naked Eye January 26th, 2015

Engineering self-assembling amyloid fibers January 26th, 2015

Tools

Visualizing interacting electrons in a molecule: Scientists at Aalto University and the University of Zurich have succeeded in directly imaging how electrons interact within a single molecule January 26th, 2015

Graphene brings quantum effects to electronic circuits January 22nd, 2015

EnvisioNano: An image contest hosted by the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) January 22nd, 2015

New Molecular Beam Epitaxy deposition equipment at the ICN2 January 22nd, 2015

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

New pathway to valleytronics January 27th, 2015

Scientists 'bend' elastic waves with new metamaterials that could have commercial applications: Materials could benefit imaging and military enhancements such as elastic cloaking January 23rd, 2015

Teijin to Participate in Nano Tech 2015 January 22nd, 2015

New method to generate arbitrary optical pulses January 21st, 2015

Quantum nanoscience

New pathway to valleytronics January 27th, 2015

Graphene brings quantum effects to electronic circuits January 22nd, 2015

Nano-beaker offers insight into the condensation of atoms January 21st, 2015

Atoms can be in 2 places at the same time: Researchers of the University of Bonn have shown that cesium atoms do not follow well-defined paths January 20th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2015 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE