Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > News > Nobel Prize-winning creator of graphene Sir Andre Geim slams government's ‘stupid’ immigration rules

January 1st, 2013

Nobel Prize-winning creator of graphene Sir Andre Geim slams government's ‘stupid’ immigration rules

Abstract:
A Russian-born scientist who won a Nobel Prize for his work at the University of Manchester has criticised the government's ‘stupid' immigration policy.

Professor Sir Andre Geim won the Nobel Prize in physics in 2010 after he and his team created the revolutionary ‘super-material' graphene.

But Sir Andre said the discovery would never have happened under tougher new immigration rules introduced this year - because he would never have been allowed into the country.

The Home Office brought in a number of extra requirements for non-EU nationals, including a minimum salary requirement of £31,000 and tighter student visa rules.

Source:
menmedia.co.uk

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

A toolkit for transformable materials: How to design materials with reprogrammable shape and function January 20th, 2017

Explaining how 2-D materials break at the atomic level January 20th, 2017

New research helps to meet the challenges of nanotechnology: Research helps to make the most of nanoscale catalytic effects for nanotechnology January 20th, 2017

Ultra-precise chip-scale sensor detects unprecedentedly small changes at the nanoscale January 20th, 2017

Graphene/ Graphite

Researchers design one of the strongest, lightest materials known: Porous, 3-D forms of graphene developed at MIT can be 10 times as strong as steel but much lighter January 7th, 2017

Nano-chimneys can cool circuits: Rice University scientists calculate tweaks to graphene would form phonon-friendly cones January 4th, 2017

First use of graphene to detect cancer cells: System able to detect activity level of single interfaced cell December 20th, 2016

New graphene-based system could help us see electrical signaling in heart and nerve cells: Berkeley-Stanford team creates a system to visualize faint electric fields December 19th, 2016

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

A toolkit for transformable materials: How to design materials with reprogrammable shape and function January 20th, 2017

'5-D protein fingerprinting' could give insights into Alzheimer's, Parkinson's January 19th, 2017

Strength of hair inspires new materials for body armor January 18th, 2017

Self-assembling particles brighten future of LED lighting January 18th, 2017

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

A toolkit for transformable materials: How to design materials with reprogrammable shape and function January 20th, 2017

Explaining how 2-D materials break at the atomic level January 20th, 2017

New research helps to meet the challenges of nanotechnology: Research helps to make the most of nanoscale catalytic effects for nanotechnology January 20th, 2017

Ultra-precise chip-scale sensor detects unprecedentedly small changes at the nanoscale January 20th, 2017

Grants/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Eric Berger Wins the National Space Society's 2017 Space Pioneer Award for Mass Media January 19th, 2017

'5-D protein fingerprinting' could give insights into Alzheimer's, Parkinson's January 19th, 2017

Nanoscale view of energy storage January 16th, 2017

Captured on video: DNA nanotubes build a bridge between 2 molecular posts: Research may lead to new lines of direct communication with cells January 9th, 2017

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project