Nanotechnology Now





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Smart scaffolding aims to rebuild tissue from the inside: NIH funds tissue engineering project at Rice University to test peptide hydrogels, starting with teeth

At top, a graphic shows multidomain peptide self-assembling into a nanofiber. The scanning electron microscope image at bottom left shows formed nanofibers; at bottom right, a histological section of cells (blue dots) grows in a dentincylinder, where they mimic the desired dental-pulp regeneration. (Credit: Hartgerink Lab/Rice University)
At top, a graphic shows multidomain peptide self-assembling into a nanofiber. The scanning electron microscope image at bottom left shows formed nanofibers; at bottom right, a histological section of cells (blue dots) grows in a dentincylinder, where they mimic the desired dental-pulp regeneration.

(Credit: Hartgerink Lab/Rice University)

Abstract:
Smart scaffolding that can guide cells, proteins and small-molecule drugs to make new tissue and repair damage inside the body is in the works at Rice University.

Smart scaffolding aims to rebuild tissue from the inside: NIH funds tissue engineering project at Rice University to test peptide hydrogels, starting with teeth

Houston, TX | Posted on November 12th, 2012

Scientists at Rice and the Texas A&M Health Science Center Baylor College of Dentistry received a $1.7 million, five-year grantfrom the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop a hydrogel that can be injected into a patient to form an active biological scaffold.

Rice bioengineer Jeffrey Hartgerink and co-investigator Rena D'Souza of Baylor won the grant to continue their groundbreaking work on self-assembling, multidomain peptide hydrogels that not only physically support but alsoencourage the growth of specific kinds of tissues.

Bioengineers use scaffolds to mimic the body's extracellular matrix, which supports the growth and maintenance of living cells. Synthetic scaffolds are used as frameworks to form replacement tissues and, perhaps someday, regenerate entire organs from a patient's own cells. Once their work is done, the scaffolds are designed to degrade and leave only natural, healthy tissue behind.

While much of the work to date has focused on creatingtissue in the laboratory for implantation, Hartgerink's aim is to inject scaffolds infused with living cells that will allow the repairs to happen inside the tissue's natural environment.

The peptides designed and prepared at Rice self-assemble into nanofibers that can be triggered to form a hydrogel. "We can then deliver cells, small-molecule drugs and proteins to bring everything together properly in one place," said Hartgerink, an associate professor of chemistry and of bioengineering at Rice. Hydrogels could be designed to interact with stem cells and "get them to do what we want them to do," he said.

Hartgerink and D'Souza, a professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences at Baylor currently on aworking sabbatical at Rice's BioScience Research Collaborative, have been pursuing the project for five years. The NIH grant will allow them to focus on the regeneration of the dentin-pulp complex found inside every tooth. The pulp, D'Souza said, is the soft tissue in the roots and crown that keeps the tooth vital and responsive to injury. "If you have a toothache, it's the tissue that's inflamed and has no place to expand. That's why it hurts so much," she said.

Currently, dentists remove inflamed pulp and replace it with an inert rubber-based filler, she said. But injecting stem cell-seeded hydrogels would allow natural pulp to regenerateinto the chamber while stimulating new dentin formation. "Hydrogels have key advantages," D'Souza said. "We can deliver them in a syringe to small spaces that are difficult to access, and the material does not get damaged. Developing this material as a restorative therapy is advantageous to patients as, unlike all other dental materials, this one is biologically active."

The researchers reached a milestone in 2010 when they found a way to have the fibers degrade rather than stay in the body. With the new grant, they hope to start trials of their dental hydrogel within two years, D'Souza said. "I can see potential applications for hydrogel, for example, for spinal cord regeneration or for various eye conditions, where we can restore the vitreous humour," she said.

Hartgerink is glad to have the NIH on board, but noted the grant would not have been possible without initial support from the Welch Foundation. "I've had Welch funding since the day I got here, and it has allowed me to do the preliminary work for all the grants we ended up getting," he said. "It's good to have them in Texas."

D'Souza said the seed grant money provided by the International Association for Dental Research in collaboration with GlaxoSmithKline enabled her laboratory to perform proof-of-concept stem cell experiments. "This is a great example of the huge benefits of interdisciplinary collaboration where, by combining expertise, we can push the frontiers of translational and clinical research forward."

The NIH grant is administered by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research.

####

About Rice University
Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation's top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,708 undergraduates and 2,374graduate students, Rice's undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice has been ranked No. 1 for best quality of life multiple times by the Princeton Review and No. 4 for "best value" among private universities by Kiplinger's Personal Finance. To read "What they're saying about Rice," go to www.rice.edu/nationalmedia/Rice.pdf.

Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
David Ruth
713-348-6327


Mike Williams
713-348-6728

Copyright © Rice University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Hartgerink Group:

A Customized Self-Assembling Peptide Hydrogel for Dental Pulp Tissue Engineering:

Related News Press

News and information

Harris & Harris Group Portfolio Company, AgBiome, Announces Partnership to Accelerate the Discovery of Next Generation Insect-Resistant Crops July 1st, 2015

Bruker Introduces Second-Generation Inspire Nanochemical Imaging Solution: Featuring Unique PeakForce IR and IR EasyAlign Technology July 1st, 2015

GLOBALFOUNDRIES Completes Acquisition of IBM Microelectronics Business: Transaction adds differentiating technologies, world-class technologists, and intellectual property July 1st, 2015

Samsung's New Graphene Technology Will Double Life Of Your Lithium-Ion Battery July 1st, 2015

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Proposed TSCA Nanomaterial Rule ‘Premature’, Says Former EPA Toxicologist July 1st, 2015

Carnegie Mellon chemists characterize 3-D macroporous hydrogels: Methods will allow researchers to develop new 'smart' materials June 30th, 2015

Graphene flexes its electronic muscles: Rice-led researchers calculate electrical properties of carbon cones, other shapes June 30th, 2015

X-rays and electrons join forces to map catalytic reactions in real-time: New technique combines electron microscopy and synchrotron X-rays to track chemical reactions under real operating conditions June 29th, 2015

Self Assembly

New conductive ink for electronic apparel June 25th, 2015

Giving atoms their marching orders: Highly homogeneous nanotube enforces single-file flow of atoms in gas diffusion. Direct comparison of single-file and Fickian diffusion possible with new system described by researchers at the University of South Carolina and University of Flor June 24th, 2015

n-tech Research Issues Report on Smart Coatings Market, Free Download Available on Firm’s Website June 24th, 2015

Sweeping lasers snap together nanoscale geometric grids: New technique creates multi-layered, self-assembled grids with fully customizable shapes and compositions June 23rd, 2015

Discoveries

Emergence of a 'devil's staircase' in a spin-valve system July 1st, 2015

Measurement of Tiny Amounts of Heavy Metals in Baby Food Samples July 1st, 2015

Chitosan coated, chemotherapy packed nanoparticles may target cancer stem cells June 30th, 2015

Graphene flexes its electronic muscles: Rice-led researchers calculate electrical properties of carbon cones, other shapes June 30th, 2015

Announcements

Leti Announces Launch of First European Nanomedicine Characterisation Laboratory: Project Combines Expertise of 9 Partners in 8 Countries to Foster Nanomedicine Innovation and Facilitate Regulatory Approval July 1st, 2015

Bruker Introduces Second-Generation Inspire Nanochemical Imaging Solution: Featuring Unique PeakForce IR and IR EasyAlign Technology July 1st, 2015

GLOBALFOUNDRIES Completes Acquisition of IBM Microelectronics Business: Transaction adds differentiating technologies, world-class technologists, and intellectual property July 1st, 2015

Samsung's New Graphene Technology Will Double Life Of Your Lithium-Ion Battery July 1st, 2015

Research partnerships

Harris & Harris Group Portfolio Company, AgBiome, Announces Partnership to Accelerate the Discovery of Next Generation Insect-Resistant Crops July 1st, 2015

Leti Announces Launch of First European Nanomedicine Characterisation Laboratory: Project Combines Expertise of 9 Partners in 8 Countries to Foster Nanomedicine Innovation and Facilitate Regulatory Approval July 1st, 2015

Carnegie Mellon chemists characterize 3-D macroporous hydrogels: Methods will allow researchers to develop new 'smart' materials June 30th, 2015

Graphene flexes its electronic muscles: Rice-led researchers calculate electrical properties of carbon cones, other shapes June 30th, 2015

Dental

Strong teeth: Nanostructures under stress make teeth crack resistant June 10th, 2015

Deben reports on the research of Dr Sunita Ho from UCSF using a CCT500 tensile stage to study the behaviour of dental materials April 14th, 2015

A novel way to apply drugs to dental plaque Nanoparticles release drugs to reduce tooth decay April 1st, 2015

Graphene reduces wear of alumina ceramic March 26th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project