Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Microfluidic Breakthroughs Offer New Options for Ease and Accuracy in Extraction of Rare Cells or Separating Blood

Photo By: Xiao Wang
This image shows the size-dependent extraction of particles. The fluorescent image indicates trapping of larger particles while smaller particles pass through.
Photo By: Xiao Wang

This image shows the size-dependent extraction of particles. The fluorescent image indicates trapping of larger particles while smaller particles pass through.

Abstract:
Using something called "inertial microfluidics," University of Cincinnati researchers are able to continuously and selectively collect rare cells, such as circulating tumor cells, based on their size vs. other biomarkers. This could reduce analysis time and increase selectivity while reducing reliance on antibody-based testing in clinical tests.

Microfluidic Breakthroughs Offer New Options for Ease and Accuracy in Extraction of Rare Cells or Separating Blood

Cincinnati, OH | Posted on October 26th, 2012

At the Sixteenth International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences (microTAS) to be held Oct. 28-Nov. 1, in Okinawa, Japan, University of Cincinnati researchers will present four papers, including one detailing improvements in rare cell isolation and one detailing improvements, in terms of cost and time, of common blood tests.

Ian Papautsky, associate professor in UC's School of Electronic and Computing Systems (SECS), part of the College of Engineering and Applied Science, and a UC team are leading these research efforts.

In a paper titled "Continuous Rare Cell Extraction Using Self-Releasing Vortex in an Inertial Microfluidic Device" by Papautsky and co-authors Xiao Wang, UC doctoral student, and Jian Zhou, research associate, a new concept for separation of rare cells, such as prostate cancer cells or circulating tumor cells, using microfluidics, is detailed.

"Last year we showed we can selectively isolate prostate cancer cells, but only by running small sample volumes one at a time. Now we show that we can do this continuously," Papautsky said. "This is exciting because it allows for an entire blood draw to be processed, in continuous matter, in a shorter period of time."

These blood draws can be used to identify tumor cells for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. "Our approach is based purely on size. It doesn't rely on antibodies, which is important because not all cancer cells express antigens. So, if the cancer cells are, let's say, larger than 20 microns, we'll extract them," he explained.

The most common approach for looking for these circulating tumor cells is via a system that uses a selection using antibodies to detect antigens. "We could also use our device to prepare samples for systems that use antibody-based selection." This combined approach could potentially help reduce occurrence of false positives while significantly increasing the accuracy of the antibody-based tests.

Another area in which this device could be useful is in working with cell cultures. "If you have a mixture of multiple cells where some cells are small and other cells are big, we could separate these cell populations very easily," Papautsky explained. "Anytime you need to separate based on size, we can do it using inertial microfluidics."

The advantage of inertial microfluidics in cell separation is that it can be done easily and without cumbersome equipment. This research is leading to an entirely new generation of testing capabilities which particularly lend themselves to direct use in the field and in physicians' offices in just about any country and any economic setting.

In another paper, titled "Sorting of Blood in Spiral Microchannels" Papautsky and doctoral student Nivedita Nivedita demonstrate continuous sorting of blood utilizing inertial microfluidics via a simple passive microfluidic device. Papautsky's lab has been developing the concept of using inertia to manipulate cells and particles during the last few years. "It's truly different and innovative because these microfluidic devices are really low cost while offering very high throughput," said Papautsky.

The device is, essentially, a clear, plastic, flexible square that is relatively small in size, at about a half an inch across, but big in concept. "With this particular device we can take a drop of blood, put it in the input port in the center, and separate," Papautsky explained. The device contains four outlet ports which separate the blood into different streams, allowing the collection of outputs containing dilute plasma, red blood cells and white blood cells.

The most common approach for looking for these circulating tumor cells is via a system that uses a selection using antibodies to detect antigens. "We could also use our device to prepare samples for systems that use antibody-based selection." This combined approach could potentially help reduce occurrence of false positives while significantly increasing the accuracy of the antibody-based tests.

Another area in which this device could be useful is in working with cell cultures. "If you have a mixture of multiple cells where some cells are small and other cells are big, we could separate these cell populations very easily," Papautsky explained. "Anytime you need to separate based on size, we can do it using inertial microfluidics."

The advantage of inertial microfluidics in cell separation is that it can be done easily and without cumbersome equipment. This research is leading to an entirely new generation of testing capabilities which particularly lend themselves to direct use in the field and in physicians' offices in just about any country and any economic setting.

In another paper, titled "Sorting of Blood in Spiral Microchannels" Papautsky and doctoral student Nivedita Nivedita demonstrate continuous sorting of blood utilizing inertial microfluidics via a simple passive microfluidic device. Papautsky's lab has been developing the concept of using inertia to manipulate cells and particles during the last few years. "It's truly different and innovative because these microfluidic devices are really low cost while offering very high throughput," said Papautsky.

The device is, essentially, a clear, plastic, flexible square that is relatively small in size, at about a half an inch across, but big in concept. "With this particular device we can take a drop of blood, put it in the input port in the center, and separate," Papautsky explained. The device contains four outlet ports which separate the blood into different streams, allowing the collection of outputs containing dilute plasma, red blood cells and white blood cells.
spiral microchannels

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
M.B. Reilly

513-556-1824

Copyright © University of Cincinnati

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Device invented at Johns Hopkins provides up-close look at cancer on the move: Microscopic view of metastasis could give insight about how to keep cancer in check October 31st, 2014

First Observation of Electronic Structure in Ag-Rh Alloy Nanoparticles Having Hydrogen Absorbing: Storage Property –Attempting to solve the mystery of why Ag-Rh alloy nanoparticles have a similar property to Pd– October 30th, 2014

Iranians Present Model to Predict Photocatalytic Process in Removal of Pollutants October 30th, 2014

Production of Biocompatible Polymers in Iran October 30th, 2014

Microfluidics/Nanofluidics

Dolomite and Lab on a Chip launch Productizing Science® Competition 2015 October 7th, 2014

Dolomite to launch Meros TCU-100 temperature controller at Lab-on-a-Chip & Microarray World Congress September 15th, 2014

First Colloid and Polymer Science Lecture awarded to Orlin D. Velev: Chemical engineer honored for outstanding research in colloid science September 12th, 2014

UO-Berkeley Lab unveil new nano-sized synthetic scaffolding technique: Oil-and-water approach from Richmond's UO lab to spark new line of versatile peptoid nanosheets September 2nd, 2014

Nanomedicine

Production of Biocompatible Polymers in Iran October 30th, 2014

Amorphous Coordination Polymer Particles as alternative to classical nanoplatforms for nanomedicine October 30th, 2014

'Electronic skin' could improve early breast cancer detection October 29th, 2014

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact October 29th, 2014

Discoveries

Device invented at Johns Hopkins provides up-close look at cancer on the move: Microscopic view of metastasis could give insight about how to keep cancer in check October 31st, 2014

First Observation of Electronic Structure in Ag-Rh Alloy Nanoparticles Having Hydrogen Absorbing: Storage Property –Attempting to solve the mystery of why Ag-Rh alloy nanoparticles have a similar property to Pd– October 30th, 2014

Iranians Present Model to Predict Photocatalytic Process in Removal of Pollutants October 30th, 2014

Production of Biocompatible Polymers in Iran October 30th, 2014

Announcements

Device invented at Johns Hopkins provides up-close look at cancer on the move: Microscopic view of metastasis could give insight about how to keep cancer in check October 31st, 2014

First Observation of Electronic Structure in Ag-Rh Alloy Nanoparticles Having Hydrogen Absorbing: Storage Property –Attempting to solve the mystery of why Ag-Rh alloy nanoparticles have a similar property to Pd– October 30th, 2014

Iranians Present Model to Predict Photocatalytic Process in Removal of Pollutants October 30th, 2014

Production of Biocompatible Polymers in Iran October 30th, 2014

Events/Classes

New Compact SIMS at 61st AVS | Visit us on Booth 311 October 28th, 2014

Iran to Hold 3rd Int'l Engineering Materials, Metallurgy Conference October 25th, 2014

Iran-Made Respiratory Nano Masks Provided to Hajj Pilgrims October 23rd, 2014

MEMS & Sensors Technology Showcase: Finalists Announced for MEMS Executive Congress US 2014 October 23rd, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE





  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE