Nanotechnology Now





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Ensysce Biosciences Inc. Receives Small Business Grant from NIH to Optimize Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Formulation for Therapeutic Delivery of siRNA

Abstract:
Ensysce Biosciences Inc. announced today they have received a SBIR award of roughly $300,000 to optimize the formulation of their single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/siRNA complex for therapeutic delivery. These funds, along with the recent $1 million dollars that were raised in June and the State of Texas Emerging Technology Funds that had been awarded previously, will allow the finalization of the formulation prior to undertaking Investigational New Drug (IND) enabling studies.

Ensysce Biosciences Inc. Receives Small Business Grant from NIH to Optimize Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Formulation for Therapeutic Delivery of siRNA

Houston, TX | Posted on September 26th, 2012

siRNA is one of the most intriguing and promising approaches to cancer therapy, but adequate cellular delivery has been an issue. The SBIR award will aid the preclinical development of this ground breaking delivery technology. With completion of the studies, the Ensysce product will be poised to complete an IND application and bring SWCNT delivery of siRNA rapidly into clinical development.

Carbon nanotubes provide a means to deliver unmodified, large active molecular agents through natural barriers within the body and specifically into cancer cells. "The siRNA delivery into tumors by SWCNT and biological activity have been conclusively and repeatedly demonstrated in our animal studies. With the finalization of our formulation, our drug product will be taken through late preclinical development into human studies," said Dr. Kirkpatrick, CEO of Ensysce. "The studies funded by the NIH will complete the last stage of our product selection and we will move in to the safety studies required by the FDA to enter clinical trials."

Ensysce is located in the Biotechnology Commercialization Center in the Texas Medical Center, a site that aids its research collaborations with Rice University. "The research by Ensysce continues to demonstrate the utility of this approach for siRNA delivery," said Dr. R. Bruce Weisman, Professor of Chemistry at Rice University. "Ensysce is leading the way in showing that carbon nanotubes can effectively deliver these macromolecules and provide biological activity in tumor models."

####

About Ensysce Biosciences Inc.
Ensysce Biosciences, a Houston, TX-based nanotechnology company, is focused on the use of carbon nanotubes for therapeutics in the area of cancer treatment. The company has an extensive carbon nanotube-related, worldwide intellectual property portfolio, including IP developed at Rice University by the late Nobel Prize winner Dr. Rick Smalley.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Ensysce Biosciences Inc.
Dr. D. Lynn Kirkpatrick
713-790-0080

Copyright © Business Wire

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Seeing the action: UCSB researchers develop a novel device to image the minute forces and actions involved in cell membrane hemifusion May 27th, 2015

Physicists solve quantum tunneling mystery: ANU media release: An international team of scientists studying ultrafast physics have solved a mystery of quantum mechanics, and found that quantum tunneling is an instantaneous process May 27th, 2015

Who needs water to assemble DNA? Non-aqueous solvent supports DNA nanotechnology May 27th, 2015

Controlled Release of Anticorrosive Materials in Spot by Nanocarriers May 27th, 2015

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Nanotechnology identifies brain tumor types through MRI 'virtual biopsy' in animal studies: If results are confirmed in humans, tumor cells could someday be diagnosed by MRI imaging and treated with tumor-specific IV injections; new NIH grant will fund future study May 27th, 2015

Who needs water to assemble DNA? Non-aqueous solvent supports DNA nanotechnology May 27th, 2015

One step closer to a single-molecule device: Columbia Engineering researchers first to create a single-molecule diode -- the ultimate in miniaturization for electronic devices -- with potential for real-world applications May 25th, 2015

DNA Double Helix Does Double Duty in Assembling Arrays of Nanoparticles: Synthetic pieces of biological molecule form framework and glue for making nanoparticle clusters and arrays May 25th, 2015

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes

Basel physicists develop efficient method of signal transmission from nanocomponents May 23rd, 2015

Researchers develop new way to manufacture nanofibers May 21st, 2015

Sandia researchers first to measure thermoelectric behavior by 'Tinkertoy' materials May 20th, 2015

Cotton fibres instead of carbon nanotubes May 9th, 2015

Announcements

Physicists solve quantum tunneling mystery: ANU media release: An international team of scientists studying ultrafast physics have solved a mystery of quantum mechanics, and found that quantum tunneling is an instantaneous process May 27th, 2015

Nanotechnology identifies brain tumor types through MRI 'virtual biopsy' in animal studies: If results are confirmed in humans, tumor cells could someday be diagnosed by MRI imaging and treated with tumor-specific IV injections; new NIH grant will fund future study May 27th, 2015

Who needs water to assemble DNA? Non-aqueous solvent supports DNA nanotechnology May 27th, 2015

Controlled Release of Anticorrosive Materials in Spot by Nanocarriers May 27th, 2015

Patents/IP/Tech Transfer/Licensing

Researchers develop new way to manufacture nanofibers May 21st, 2015

Novel superconducting undulator provides first x-ray light at ANKA May 1st, 2015

Long Island Capital Alliance Announces Participants for Brookhaven National Laboratory Technology Transfer Capital Forum on May 8: Keynote Speaker Dr. Doon Gibbs, Director of Brookhaven National Laboratory April 16th, 2015

MIT sensor detects spoiled meat: Tiny device could be incorporated into 'smart packaging' to improve food safety April 15th, 2015

Grants/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

One step closer to a single-molecule device: Columbia Engineering researchers first to create a single-molecule diode -- the ultimate in miniaturization for electronic devices -- with potential for real-world applications May 25th, 2015

What makes cancer cells spread? New device offers clues May 19th, 2015

Researchers build new fermion microscope: Instrument freezes and images 1,000 individual fermionic atoms at once May 13th, 2015

International and U.S. Students and Teachers Headed to Toronto for 34th Annual International Space Development ConferenceŽ: Students competed in prestigious NSS-NASA Ames Space Settlement Design Contest May 9th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project