Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Two Illinois chemists named top young innovators

Prashant K. JainPhoto by L. Brian Stauffer
Prashant K. Jain

Photo by L. Brian Stauffer

Abstract:
Two chemistry professors at the University of Illinois - Ryan C. Bailey and Prashant K. Jain - have been chosen as two of the world's top young innovators by Technology Review, the world's oldest technology magazine.

Two Illinois chemists named top young innovators

Champaign, IL | Posted on August 21st, 2012

Selected by the editors of the magazine published by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the TR35 recognizes the world's top innovators under the age of 35 for their contributions to biomedicine, energy, the Web, computing and materials, among other emerging fields. The 2012 honorees were selected from more than 250 nominations.

Bailey's research interests lie at the interface of bioanalytical and biomaterials chemistry. He was honored for his work with chip-based tests to detect diseases at their earliest stages and then help clinicians choose the best course of personalized treatment. Unlike tests that rely on added fluorescent tags for protein detection, Bailey's chips are sensitive to the presence of the target molecule itself, which could make it fast and easy for physicians to see results.

Bailey earned his doctorate in chemistry from Northwestern University in 2004 and joined the faculty at Illinois in 2006. He also is affiliated with the department of bioengineering, Institute for Genomic Biology, and Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory at the U. of I.

Jain's research investigates interactions between light and matter. The magazine recognized Jain for his work with quantum dots with tunable optical properties. By tweaking the dots' chemical composition, Jain can control the wavelengths of light that the dots emit or absorb. This can be done on the fly allowing the dots to be turned on and off. This control means that the quantum dots could act as optical switches, key components for computers that could use light instead of electricity to transmit data - at ultra-high speeds.

Jain earned his doctorate from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2008, and held postdoctoral positions at Harvard University and the University of California-Berkeley before joining the faculty at U. of I. in 2011. He also is affiliated with the department of physics and the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology.

"This year's TR35 recipients are applying technology to some our generation's greatest challenges, and innovating to improve the way we live and work," said Jason Pontin, editor-in-chief and publisher of Technology Review. "We look forward to watching these young technology leaders grow and advance over the coming years."

Bailey, Jain and the other TR35 winners for 2012 will be featured in the September/October issue of Technology Review and online.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Liz Ahlberg
Physical Sciences Editor
217-244-1073

Copyright © University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Nano Ruffles in Brain Matter: Freiburg researchers decipher the role of nanostructures around brain cells in central nervous system function October 31st, 2014

Gold nanoparticle chains confine light to the nanoscale October 31st, 2014

'Nanomotor lithography' answers call for affordable, simpler device manufacturing October 31st, 2014

Device invented at Johns Hopkins provides up-close look at cancer on the move: Microscopic view of metastasis could give insight about how to keep cancer in check October 31st, 2014

Amorphous Coordination Polymer Particles as alternative to classical nanoplatforms for nanomedicine October 30th, 2014

Chemistry

First Observation of Electronic Structure in Ag-Rh Alloy Nanoparticles Having Hydrogen Absorbing: Storage Property –Attempting to solve the mystery of why Ag-Rh alloy nanoparticles have a similar property to Pd– October 30th, 2014

A new cheap and efficient method to improve SERS, an ultra-sensitive chemical detection technique October 28th, 2014

Iranian, Malaysian Scientists Study Nanophotocatalysts for Water Purification October 23rd, 2014

Announcements

Nano Ruffles in Brain Matter: Freiburg researchers decipher the role of nanostructures around brain cells in central nervous system function October 31st, 2014

Gold nanoparticle chains confine light to the nanoscale October 31st, 2014

'Nanomotor lithography' answers call for affordable, simpler device manufacturing October 31st, 2014

Device invented at Johns Hopkins provides up-close look at cancer on the move: Microscopic view of metastasis could give insight about how to keep cancer in check October 31st, 2014

Grants/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Microrockets fueled by water neutralize chemical and biological warfare agents October 29th, 2014

New nanodevice to improve cancer treatment monitoring October 27th, 2014

Special UO microscope captures defects in nanotubes: University of Oregon chemists provide a detailed view of traps that disrupt energy flow, possibly pointing toward improved charge-carrying devices October 21st, 2014

Crystallizing the DNA nanotechnology dream: Scientists have designed the first large DNA crystals with precisely prescribed depths and complex 3D features, which could create revolutionary nanodevices October 20th, 2014

Quantum Dots/Rods

Journal Nanotechnology Progress International (JONPI), 2014, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 1-24 October 22nd, 2014

QD Vision Wins Prestigious Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency October 16th, 2014

Ultrafast remote switching of light emission October 2nd, 2014

Platinum meets its match in quantum dots from coal: Rice University's cheap hybrid outperforms rare metal as fuel-cell catalyst October 1st, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE





  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE