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Home > Press > Dolomite given SMART award to develop a “plug and play” microfluidic system

Abstract:
Royston, UK (27th July 2012) - Microfluidics expert Dolomite has been awarded a SMART grant from the UK Government to develop a plug and play microfluidic system which will make microfluidics more accessible to a wider market and will increase productivity in research labs.

Dolomite given SMART award to develop a “plug and play” microfluidic system

Royston, UK | Posted on July 27th, 2012

The project will consist of prototyping a suite of integrated tools, specifically targeted at microfluidics users in research and education, with the ambition of providing a sophisticated suite of intelligently co-ordinated capabilities. The suite will be based around a modern touch-screen interface enabling clear visualisation of data and virtual reconfiguration of the connected hardware such as pumps and valves. The intuitive and easy to use connections to microfluidic devices will build on Dolomite's existing range of microfluidic connectors, MultifluxTM.

"At Dolomite, we believe the scientist should be free to focus on science and not have to worry about finding the right tools for their job. That's why we will provide researchers with a next generation of plug and play microfluidic platforms for use in the laboratory." Dolomite's CEO, Andrew Lovatt explained. "Once again, Dolomite will apply its world-leading expertise in microfluidic solutions to development of innovative technologies".

This project will benefit areas such as food science, pharma and petrochemical research. "Although we could develop these tools as isolated products, it is only though the support of the TSB that Dolomite can invest in far reaching product development and enable researchers to move to the next level of productivity. That's why we are extremely happy to have been awarded this grant and look forward to developing these cutting edge technologies".

The "plug and play" microfluidic system is expected to launch during 2013.

####

About The Dolomite Centre Limited
Established in 2005 as the world’s first Microfluidic Application Centre, Dolomite focused on working with customers to turn their concepts for microfluidic applications into reality. Today, Dolomite is the world leader in solving microfluidic problems. With offices in the UK and US and distributors throughout the rest of the world, its clients range from universities developing leading-edge analytical equipment, to manufacturers of chemical, life sciences and clinical diagnostics systems.

Dolomite is pioneering the use of microfluidic devices for small-scale fluid control and analysis, enabling manufacturers to develop more compact, cost-effective and powerful instruments. By combining specialist glass, quartz and ceramic technologies with knowledge of high performance microfluidics, Dolomite is able to provide solutions for a broad range of application areas including environmental monitoring, clinical diagnostics, food and beverage, nuclear, agriculture, petrochemical, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and chemicals. Furthermore Dolomite's in-house micro-fabrication facilities that include clean rooms and precision glass processing facilities allow to prototype and test all solutions rapidly which ensures a faster development cycle and reduces the time to market.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Clara Garcia
Marketing Administration Assistant
The Dolomite Centre Ltd.
Unit 1, Anglian Business Park,
Royston, SG8 5TW, UK
Phone: +44 1763 242491
Fax: +44 1763 246125

Copyright © The Dolomite Centre Limited

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