Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > New ultra-thin electronic films have greater capacity

Macromolecule containing sub-units (blocks) of several types. Here, an assembly of two types of blocks.
Macromolecule containing sub-units (blocks) of several types. Here, an assembly of two types of blocks.

Abstract:
The development of a new combination of polymers associating sugars with oil-based macromolecules makes it possible to design ultra-thin films capable of self-organization with a 5-nanometer resolution. This opens up new horizons for increasing the capacity of hard discs and the speed of microprocessors. The result of a French-American collaboration spearheaded by the Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolécules Végétales (CNRS), this work has led to the filing of two patents. It is published in the journal ACS Nano. This new class of thin films based on hybrid copolymers could give rise to numerous applications in flexible electronics, in areas as diverse as nanolithography, biosensors and photovoltaic cells.

New ultra-thin electronic films have greater capacity

Paris, France | Posted on May 12th, 2012

Before new generations of microprocessors can be devised, an evolution in lithography, the technique used for printing electronic circuits, is indispensable. Until now, the thin films used in electronic circuits have been designed from synthetic polymers exclusively derived from petroleum. However, these thin films have limitations: their minimum structural resolution is around 20 nanometers and cannot be reduced further by combining petroleum-derived polymers. This limit has been one of the main obstacles to the development of new generations of very-high-resolution flexible electronic devices.

Why was there such a limit? Because of the low incompatibility between the two blocks of polymers, both derived from oil. For that reason, the team headed by Redouane Borsali, CNRS senior researcher at the Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolécules Végétales (CERMAV), came up with a hybrid material: this new class of thin films combines sugar-based and petroleum-derived (silicon containing polystyrene) polymers with widely different physical/chemical characteristics. This copolymer(1), formed of highly incompatible elementary building blocks, is similar to an oil bubble attached to a small water bubble. The researchers have shown that this type of structure is capable of organizing itself into sugar cylinders within a petroleum-based polymer lattice, each structure having a size of 5 nanometers, i.e. much smaller than the resolution of "old" copolymers, exclusively composed of petroleum derivatives. In addition, this new generation of material is made from an abundant, renewable and biodegradable resource: sugar.

Achieving this performance makes it possible to envisage numerous applications in flexible electronics: miniaturization of circuit lithography, six-fold increase in information storage capacity (flash memories - USB keys - no longer limited to 1 Tbit of data but 6 Tbit), enhanced performance of photovoltaic cells, biosensors, etc. The researchers are now seeking to improve control of these nano-glycofilms' large-scale organization and design in different self-organized structures.

These results follow prior work carried out by CERMAV within the framework of the Grenoble RTRA (Thematic Network of Advanced Research) "Nanosciences at the limits of nanolectronics".

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Julien Guillaume
+ 33 1 44 96 51 51


CNRS researcher
Redouane Borsali
T +33 (0)4 76 03 76 40 l

CNRS press officer
Priscilla Dacher
T +33 (0)1 44 96 46 06 l

Copyright © AlphaGalileo

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Controlling phase changes in solids: Controlling phase changes in solids July 29th, 2015

Liquipel Debuts Eyesight-Saving ION-Glass Blue Light Protection for iPhones and Androids at RadioShack Stores Nationwide: Liquipel's Unique Protective Screen, Available at RadioShack, Cuts Harmful Blue Light Implicated in Macular Degeneration by 10x July 28th, 2015

Nanophase to present paper on slurry pH impact at Optics + Photonics conference July 28th, 2015

Laboratorial Performance of Nanocomposite Membrane Improved in Water Purification July 28th, 2015

Thin films

Iranian Scientists Create Best Conditions for Synthesis of Gold Nanolayers July 23rd, 2015

ORNL researchers make scalable arrays of 'building blocks' for ultrathin electronics July 22nd, 2015

Industrial Nanotech, Inc. Introduces Ultra Thin High Performance Thermal Insulation Film for Cooling Personal Electronic Devices July 21st, 2015

Imec Makes Steady Progress on Perovskite Photovoltaic Module reaching a Record 11 Percent Conversion Efficiency July 16th, 2015

Chip Technology

Nanometrics Announces Upcoming Investor Events July 28th, 2015

Short wavelength plasmons observed in nanotubes: Berkeley Lab researchers create Ludinger liquid plasmons in metallic SWNTs July 28th, 2015

Quantum networks: Back and forth are not equal distances! July 28th, 2015

Superfast fluorescence sets new speed record: Plasmonic device has speed and efficiency to serve optical computers July 27th, 2015

Self Assembly

New computer model could explain how simple molecules took first step toward life: Two Brookhaven researchers developed theoretical model to explain the origins of self-replicating molecules July 28th, 2015

Spintronics: Molecules stabilizing magnetism: Organic molecules fixing the magnetic orientation of a cobalt surface/ building block for a compact and low-cost storage technology/ publication in Nature Materials July 25th, 2015

Imec introduces self-assembled monomolecular organic films to seal ultra-porous low- k materials: Method prevents leakage of barrier precursors during the interconnect metallization scheme July 15th, 2015

Clay sheets stack to form proton conductors: Model system demonstrates a new material property emerging from the assembly of nanoscale building blocks July 13th, 2015

Sensors

American Chemical Society expands reach to include rapidly emerging area of sensor science July 25th, 2015

UT Dallas nanotechnology research leads to super-elastic conducting fibers July 24th, 2015

Iranian Scientists Create Best Conditions for Synthesis of Gold Nanolayers July 23rd, 2015

Nanopaper as an optical sensing platform July 23rd, 2015

Discoveries

Controlling phase changes in solids: Controlling phase changes in solids July 29th, 2015

New computer model could explain how simple molecules took first step toward life: Two Brookhaven researchers developed theoretical model to explain the origins of self-replicating molecules July 28th, 2015

Short wavelength plasmons observed in nanotubes: Berkeley Lab researchers create Ludinger liquid plasmons in metallic SWNTs July 28th, 2015

'Seeing' molecular interactions could give boost to organic electronics July 28th, 2015

Announcements

Controlling phase changes in solids: Controlling phase changes in solids July 29th, 2015

Perfect Optical Properties in Production of Aluminum Oxide Colloid Nanoparticles July 28th, 2015

Short wavelength plasmons observed in nanotubes: Berkeley Lab researchers create Ludinger liquid plasmons in metallic SWNTs July 28th, 2015

'Seeing' molecular interactions could give boost to organic electronics July 28th, 2015

Patents/IP/Tech Transfer/Licensing

Quantum networks: Back and forth are not equal distances! July 28th, 2015

Reshaping the solar spectrum to turn light to electricity: UC Riverside researchers find a way to use the infrared region of the sun's spectrum to make solar cells more efficient July 27th, 2015

Smarter window materials can control light and energy July 22nd, 2015

Magnetic nanoparticles could be key to effective immunotherapy: New method moves promising strategy closer to clinical use July 15th, 2015

Energy

Smaller, faster, cheaper: A new type of modulator for the future of data transmission July 27th, 2015

Reshaping the solar spectrum to turn light to electricity: UC Riverside researchers find a way to use the infrared region of the sun's spectrum to make solar cells more efficient July 27th, 2015

Industrial Nanotech, Inc. Provides Update on PCAOB Audited Financials July 27th, 2015

Ultra-thin hollow nanocages could reduce platinum use in fuel cell electrodes July 24th, 2015

Solar/Photovoltaic

Reshaping the solar spectrum to turn light to electricity: UC Riverside researchers find a way to use the infrared region of the sun's spectrum to make solar cells more efficient July 27th, 2015

Rice University finding could lead to cheap, efficient metal-based solar cells: Plasmonics study suggests how to maximize production of 'hot electrons' July 22nd, 2015

Perovskite solar technology shows quick energy returns: New technology beats current solar panel technology in life-cycle energy assessment July 20th, 2015

Nanowires give 'solar fuel cell' efficiency a tenfold boost: Eindhoven researchers make important step towards a solar cell that generates hydrogen July 17th, 2015

Printing/Lithography/Inkjet/Inks

Spintronics: Molecules stabilizing magnetism: Organic molecules fixing the magnetic orientation of a cobalt surface/ building block for a compact and low-cost storage technology/ publication in Nature Materials July 25th, 2015

2015 Bulk Graphene Pricing Webinar:The Graphene Council to Host Webinar in Collaboration with Fullerex July 15th, 2015

Leti and EVG Launch INSPIRE, a Lithography Program Aimed At Demonstrating Benefits of Nano-imprint Technology July 15th, 2015

New technology using silver may hold key to electronics advances July 2nd, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project