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Home > News > Sniffing out explosives

May 1st, 2012

Sniffing out explosives

Abstract:
Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), hollow one-atom-thick cylinders, could also make good explosives sensors, thanks to their fluorescence in the near infrared. SWNTs can be coupled to molecules designed to bind to a target molecule, so that the fluorescence changes in a measurable way when the target binds. Michael Strano at MIT is a pioneer in this field. His group has developed carbon nanotube sensors for a range of molecules from nitric oxide to hydrogen peroxide.

Source:
rsc.org

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