Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Doped diamond structures offer promise for biotech applications

Figure. (a) Micrograph of SGFET source, gate and drain showing passivation openings. (b) Macro photograph of wire bonded device prior to encapsulation. Sample is 2x2 mm. (c) Epoxy encapsulated SGFET. (d) Experimental setup of SGFET using a MESFET analogy, depicting the channel depleted in the saturation regime.
Figure. (a) Micrograph of SGFET source, gate and drain showing passivation openings. (b) Macro photograph of wire bonded device prior to encapsulation. Sample is 2x2 mm. (c) Epoxy encapsulated SGFET. (d) Experimental setup of SGFET using a MESFET analogy, depicting the channel depleted in the saturation regime.

Abstract:
In a collaboration with Waseda University in Tokyo, LCN researchers have grown highly boron doped diamond layers only 1nm in thickness, a technique known as d-doping, for the realisation of high performance field effect transistors (FETs). When used in a novel configuration, where the normal metal gate that controls the transistor is replaced by an ion containing solution, such devices offer the prospect of highly sensitive detection of biochemical agents, or even action potentials from living cells.

Doped diamond structures offer promise for biotech applications

London, UK | Posted on April 28th, 2012

Professor Richard Jackman, who heads the LCNs Diamond Electronics Group, stated "this is the first time that the (111) crystal plane of diamond has been used to generate such heavily doped yet so incredibly thin layers. The resulting transistors offer very good gain and transconductance values when compared to similar devices". The work was performed in a collaboration between the LCN and Professor Kawarada's Diamond Devices team in Japan, with the secondment of Robert Edgington, a PhD student with the LCN team, to Waseda University for five months being made possible through a "Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS)" award. Robert found the experience valuable beyond just science, "to spend five months immersed in Japanese culture was transforming for me" said Robert, who had the opportunity to practice the Japanese language he had been studying in London prior to his visit. "Diamond surfaces offer a unique platform for chemical functionalisation for the purposes of biosensing" states Professor Jackman, who continued "we have encouraging initial data on the detection of PDGF, a growth factor linked with the promotion of cancer, using aptamers bound to the surface of the gate of the diamond transistor". Robert, who will continue similar work as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow with the UCL Diamond team, added "the work was very hands-on, with the development of diamond growth and doping techniques, the design of FET device structures, and the manipulation of biochemical species, representing a truly interdisciplinary activity".

Boron δ-doped (111) diamond Solution Gate Field Effect Transistors Robert Edgingtona, A. Rahim Ruslindab, Syunsuke Satob, Yuichiro Ishiyamab, Kyosuke Tsugeb, Tasuku Onob, Hiroshi Kawaradab and Richard B. Jackmana*
a London Centre for Nanotechnology, and Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, 17-19 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AH, UK
b Department of Electronic and Photonic Systems, Waseda University, Okubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555, Japan
* Corresponding author. Tel.: +442076791381; fax: +442076790595 E-mail address: (R. B. Jackman)

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © London Centre for Nanotechnology

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Journal link: Biosensors and Bioelectronics (IF 5.63), 33, 152-157 (2012) DOI 10.1016/j.bios.2011.12.044:

Related News Press

News and information

Antibacterial Ceramic Nanoparticles, Appropriate Material for Medical Devices May 3rd, 2015

Oxford Instruments announces winners of the 2015 Sir Martin Wood Science Prize for China May 2nd, 2015

Time Dependant Spectroscopy of Microscopic Samples: CRAIC TimePro™ software is used with CRAIC Technologies microspectrometers to measure the kinetic UV-visible-NIR, Raman and fluorescence spectra of microscopic sample areas May 2nd, 2015

ORNL researchers probe chemistry, topography and mechanics with one instrument May 2nd, 2015

Chip Technology

Nanometrics to Present at the B. Riley & Co. 16th Annual Investor Conference May 2nd, 2015

SUNY Poly and Sematech Announce Air Products Joins Cutting-Edge CMP Center At Albany Nanotech Complex April 28th, 2015

Two-dimensional semiconductor comes clean April 27th, 2015

Surface matters: Huge reduction of heat conduction observed in flat silicon channels April 23rd, 2015

Nanomedicine

Antibacterial Ceramic Nanoparticles, Appropriate Material for Medical Devices May 3rd, 2015

Polymeric Nanocarriers Improve Performance of Anticancer Drugs April 30th, 2015

Artificial photosynthesis could help make fuels, plastics and medicine April 29th, 2015

A phone with the ultimate macro feature: New attachment turns a smartphone into a microscope that can image and size DNA molecules 50,000 times thinner than a human hair April 29th, 2015

Sensors

Making robots more human April 29th, 2015

Simultaneous Measurement of Drugs Made Possible by Nanosensors April 29th, 2015

Sensor Designed in Iran Able to Remove Formaldehyde Gas from Environment April 27th, 2015

ORNL reports method that takes quantum sensing to new level April 23rd, 2015

Discoveries

Antibacterial Ceramic Nanoparticles, Appropriate Material for Medical Devices May 3rd, 2015

ORNL researchers probe chemistry, topography and mechanics with one instrument May 2nd, 2015

Novel superconducting undulator provides first x-ray light at ANKA May 1st, 2015

Engineering a better solar cell: UW research pinpoints defects in popular perovskites May 1st, 2015

Announcements

Antibacterial Ceramic Nanoparticles, Appropriate Material for Medical Devices May 3rd, 2015

Nanometrics to Present at the B. Riley & Co. 16th Annual Investor Conference May 2nd, 2015

Time Dependant Spectroscopy of Microscopic Samples: CRAIC TimePro™ software is used with CRAIC Technologies microspectrometers to measure the kinetic UV-visible-NIR, Raman and fluorescence spectra of microscopic sample areas May 2nd, 2015

ORNL researchers probe chemistry, topography and mechanics with one instrument May 2nd, 2015

Alliances/Partnerships/Distributorships

How can you see an atom? (video) April 10th, 2015

FibeRio and VF Corporation Form Strategic Partnership to Lead the Apparel and Footwear Markets in Nanofiber Technology April 8th, 2015

UK National Graphene Institute Selects Bruker as Official Partner: World-Leading Graphene Research Facility Purchases Multiple Bruker AFMs April 7th, 2015

NXP and GLOBALFOUNDRIES Announce Production of 40nm Embedded Non-Volatile Memory Technology: Co-developed technology to leverage GLOBALFOUNDRIES 40nm process technology platform March 24th, 2015

Research partnerships

Electron chirp: Cyclotron radiation from single electrons measured directly for first time: Method has potential to measure neutrino mass and look beyond the Standard Model of the universe April 29th, 2015

Weighing -- and imaging -- molecules one at a time April 28th, 2015

SUNY Poly and Sematech Announce Air Products Joins Cutting-Edge CMP Center At Albany Nanotech Complex April 28th, 2015

When mediated by superconductivity, light pushes matter million times more April 28th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project