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Home > Press > Toyohashi Tech eNewsletter: graphene, bacteria, hard electronics, and pH imaging

Abstract:
Toyohashi Tech eNewsletter: From the invention of the pH imaging microscope to synthesis of graphene using bacteria to hard electronics, the Toyohashi Tech e-Newsletter describes a diverse range of research activities being undertaken by faculty at the Toyohashi University of Technology.

Toyohashi Tech eNewsletter: graphene, bacteria, hard electronics, and pH imaging

Toyohashi, Japan | Posted on March 22nd, 2012

This week Toyohashi Tech publishes the March 2012 issue of the e-Newsletter. The issue includes ‘Research Highlights' — easy-to-understand summaries of some of the top papers from researchers at the university — as well as news and views from one of Japan's most dynamic science and technology based universities.

In this issue's Research Highlights

www.tut.ac.jp/english/newsletter/research_highlights/index.html

Scientists produce graphene using microorganisms

www.tut.ac.jp/english/newsletter/research_highlights/research02.html

Here the Graphene Research Group at Toyohashi Tech report on the synthesis of graphene by reducing graphene oxide using microorganisms extracted from a local river.

Multimodal pH sensor: Fusion of heterogeneous biochemical information

www.tut.ac.jp/english/newsletter/research_highlights/research03.html

In this study, Hirokazu Nakazawa and colleagues describe a multimodal bio-image sensor that can render images of the two-dimensional distribution of proton concentration (pH) and fluorescence intensity for multimodal analyses of biochemical objects.

Graphene: Potential for modelling cell membrane systems

www.tut.ac.jp/english/newsletter/research_highlights/research04.html

Ryugo Tero and his colleagues in the Graphene Research Group at Toyohashi University of Technology have established a new procedure to fabricate artificial planar lipid membranes on graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (r-GO) as a means of detecting biomolecules such as lipids and proteins on and inside lipid bilayers.

Hard electronics: Hall magnetic field sensors for high temperatures and harmful radiation environments

www.tut.ac.jp/english/newsletter/research_highlights/research04.html

Toyohashi Tech researchers have fabricated Hall effect magnetic field sensors operable at least 400oC and in extreme radiation conditions using gallium nitride-based heterostructures a with two-dimensional electron gas.

In this issue's ‘Tech-Overtures' Tech Overtures: The Toyohashi Tech pH image sensor

www.tut.ac.jp/english/newsletter/tech_overtures/index.html

The pH image sensor was invented by Kazuaki Sawada of Toyohashi University of Technology. The device enables two dimensional visualization of both the pH and optical imaging of chemical activity of solutions and cell activity.

Other features of the Toyohashi Tech e-Newsletter include:

The invention and possibilities of the pH microscope

Kazuaki Sawada is the head of the Toyohashi Tech Venture Business Laboratory (VBL) and inventor of the ‘pH image sensor'. "We refer to the equipment housed in the VBL as the ‘LSI Factory', says Sawada. "The CMOS fabrication line housed in the LSI factory has been played a central role in the wide range of intelligent sensors and systems developed at Toyohashi Tech. We can start with an idea, design and produce masks, and then actually fabricate and test CMOS devices—we do not outsource any of these stages. The first CMOS chips for the pH image sensor were fabricated here."

www.tut.ac.jp/english/newsletter/features/index.html

News, events and activities of the university including:

Toyohashi Tech Kendo Club: You must be frightened to win

Toyohashi Tech International students visit Kyoto

G-COE: Frontiers of Intelligent Sensing Symposium

Toyohashi Tech delegation participates in the Japan Education Fair in Vietnam

####

About Toyohashi University of Technology (Toyohashi Tech)
Founded in 1976, Toyohashi University of Technology is a vibrant modern institute with research activities reflecting the modern era of advanced electronics, engineering, and life sciences.

About the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS):

EIIRIS is Toyohashi Tech’s new flagship research complex launched on 1st October 2010. "The aim of EIIRIS is to produce world-class innovative research," says President Yoshiyuki Sakaki. "To do this we are bringing together ambitious young researchers from diverse fields to collaborate on pioneering new frontiers in science such as brain/neuro-electronics as well as tackling some of the major issues mankind faces today: issues such as environmental changes and aging societies."

Website: www.eiiris.tut.ac.jp/index.html

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Ms. Junko Sugaya and
Mr. Masashi Yamaguchi
International Affairs Division
TEL: (+81) 0532-44-2042; FAX: (+81)0532-44-6557

Copyright © Toyohashi University of Technology (Toyohashi Tech)

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