Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > iPower, a systematic approach to design system architectures with power, area and cost in mind from day one

The route from application specifications to optimized system design: the use of iPower in the healthcare domain for arrhytmia patient monitoring. The application specifications enable power, volume and cost diagnosis and optimization.
The route from application specifications to optimized system design: the use of iPower in the healthcare domain for arrhytmia patient monitoring. The application specifications enable power, volume and cost diagnosis and optimization.

Abstract:
mec and Holst Centre present a powerful method called iPower that allows designing system architectures with optimized power consumption, area and cost. Truly optimized performances are achieved by combining know-how on energy harvesting, low-power electronics and application-level optimization techniques. The method can be used by system designers in application domains such as healthcare, automotive and smart buildings.

iPower, a systematic approach to design system architectures with power, area and cost in mind from day one

Leuven, Belgium | Posted on March 15th, 2012

With iPower, a system architecture can be designed while taking into account power, area and cost from day one. This is useful for designing today's autonomous systems in domains like healthcare, e.g. heart and brain monitoring systems; automotive, e.g. engine monitoring and intelligent tires; and smart buildings, e.g. smart metering and lighting control. Applications like these become more complex, demand more power and at the same time must be as small and low-cost as possible.

The iPower method starts from application specifications such as system area and cost, radio transmission time periods and analog-to-digital converter sampling intervals. Based on these parameters, system power, area and cost diagnosis and optimization are carried out. The output is a selection of components that form the most optimum system. Design and testing of the optimized system may be performed to validate and improve the method's accuracy. The obtained information can be used to continuously steer the research and development cycle.

Key step in the design flow is the power, area and cost optimization. This step is illustrated in the healthcare domain for arrhytmia patient monitoring. The electronics dimensions and price are taken as input for the area and cost estimation; the application conditions for energy harvesting and electronics are the inputs for the power consumption optimization. For these input parameters, iPower then selects the lowest in power consumption components from an existing database and the power modes for each electronic component, e.g. radio, microcontroller..., so that the overall power consumption at the architectural level is minimized. This way, the power consumption of the initial arrhytmia monitoring system could be significantly reduced.

iPower combines over five years of research experience in energy harvesting and low-power electronics design with effective modeling techniques at component and architectural levels. Future work will focus on extending the applicability of the developed method towards new system architectures and application domains. In addition, more power consumption/generation, volume and cost reduction optimization techniques at architectural level will be considered.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Barbara Kalkis
Maestro Marketing & PR

Copyright © IMEC

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

A big nano boost for solar cells: Kyoto University and Osaka Gas effort doubles current efficiencies January 21st, 2017

A toolkit for transformable materials: How to design materials with reprogrammable shape and function January 20th, 2017

Explaining how 2-D materials break at the atomic level January 20th, 2017

New research helps to meet the challenges of nanotechnology: Research helps to make the most of nanoscale catalytic effects for nanotechnology January 20th, 2017

Chip Technology

Explaining how 2-D materials break at the atomic level January 20th, 2017

New research helps to meet the challenges of nanotechnology: Research helps to make the most of nanoscale catalytic effects for nanotechnology January 20th, 2017

Ultra-precise chip-scale sensor detects unprecedentedly small changes at the nanoscale January 20th, 2017

Nanometrics to Announce Fourth Quarter and Full Year Financial Results on February 7, 2017 January 19th, 2017

Announcements

A big nano boost for solar cells: Kyoto University and Osaka Gas effort doubles current efficiencies January 21st, 2017

A toolkit for transformable materials: How to design materials with reprogrammable shape and function January 20th, 2017

New research helps to meet the challenges of nanotechnology: Research helps to make the most of nanoscale catalytic effects for nanotechnology January 20th, 2017

Ultra-precise chip-scale sensor detects unprecedentedly small changes at the nanoscale January 20th, 2017

Energy

A big nano boost for solar cells: Kyoto University and Osaka Gas effort doubles current efficiencies January 21st, 2017

Chemists Cook up New Nanomaterial and Imaging Method: Nanomaterials can store all kinds of things, including energy, drugs and other cargo January 19th, 2017

Dressing a metal in various colors: DGIST research developed a technology to coat metal with several nanometers of semiconducting materials January 17th, 2017

Stability challenge in perovskite solar cell technology: New research reveals intrinsic instability issues of iodine-containing perovskite solar cells December 26th, 2016

Automotive/Transportation

Nanoscale view of energy storage January 16th, 2017

Illinois team advances GaN-on-Silicon for scalable high electron mobility transistors January 10th, 2017

Going green with nanotechnology December 21st, 2016

Scientists boost catalytic activity for key chemical reaction in fuel cells: New platinum-based catalysts with tensile surface strain could improve fuel cell efficiency December 19th, 2016

Battery Technology/Capacitors/Generators/Piezoelectrics/Thermoelectrics/Energy storage

Chemists Cook up New Nanomaterial and Imaging Method: Nanomaterials can store all kinds of things, including energy, drugs and other cargo January 19th, 2017

Nanoscale view of energy storage January 16th, 2017

One step closer to reality: Devices that convert heat into electricity: Composite material yields 10 times -- or higher -- voltage output January 4th, 2017

STMicroelectronics Peps Up Booming Social-Fitness Scene with Smart Motion Sensors for Better Accuracy, Longer Battery Life, and Faster Time to Market January 2nd, 2017

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project