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Home > Press > MSU spin-out company to market portable biohazard detection

A scanning electron  microscope image of E. coli O157:H7 bacteria captured on the surface of a biosensor chip. Photo courtesy of Evangelyn Alocilja laboratory
A scanning electron microscope image of E. coli O157:H7 bacteria captured on the surface of a biosensor chip. Photo courtesy of Evangelyn Alocilja laboratory

Abstract:
A new company formed around Michigan State University nanotechnology promises to move speedy detection of deadly pathogens and toxins from the laboratory directly to the field.

MSU spin-out company to market portable biohazard detection

East Lansing, MI | Posted on January 30th, 2012

Food contamination and other biohazards present a growing public health concern, but laboratory analysis consumes precious time. The company, nanoRETE, will develop and commercialize an inexpensive test for handheld biosensors to detect a broad range of threats such as E.coli, Salmonella, anthrax and tuberculosis.

A significant leap forward in detection and diagnostic technology, it utilizes novel nanoparticles with magnetic, polymeric and electrical properties developed by Evangelyn Alocilja, MSU professor of biosystems and agricultural engineering and chief scientific officer of nanoRETE.

"Our unique preparation, extraction and detection protocol enables the entire process to be conducted in the field, without significant training," Alocilja said. "Results are generated in about an hour from receipt of sample to final readout, quickly identifying contaminants so that proper and prompt actions can be taken."

The mobile technology comes at only a fraction of the cost of the closest currently available competing technology, company officials said.

"Although the technology originates from research for biodefense applications, its potential reaches far beyond the initial scope," said Fred Beyerlein, CEO of nanoRETE. "Our X-MARK platform-based technology has the ability to detect multiple pathogens or toxins at one time, in a rapid, point-of-use, cost-effective manner. Imagine the potential applications for food growers, packagers or sellers. Contaminated food or water could be quickly identified, isolated and resolved before reaching the ultimate consumer - you or me."

nanoRETE is backed by Michigan Accelerator Fund I, a Grand Rapids, Mich., investment partnership focused on Michigan-based early stage life science and technology companies.

"Our task was to find promising technologies, identify strong management and support with investment dollars," MAF-1 managing director Dale Grogan said. "We reviewed literally hundreds of technologies developed within MSU and determined that this particular technology best fit our investment model. We are excited about nanoRETE's future and hope this is the first of many companies we help develop with MSU."

MSU Technologies, the office that manages technology transfer at MSU, was actively involved in licensing the technologies to nanoRETE. In addition to other grants, the technologies earned funding from the MSU Foundation to continue development across the financial "valley of death" between research and commercialization.

"We have had great faith that Dr. Alocilja's work in nano-scale detection would be a very successful platform on which to start a new company," said Charles Hasemann, executive director of MSU Technologies. "MAF-1 has been a great partner in building nanoRETE. With its partnership and investment, we expect to move rapidly to a marketable product."

####

About Michigan State University
Michigan State University has been working to advance the common good in uncommon ways for more than 150 years. One of the top research universities in the world, MSU focuses its vast resources on creating solutions to some of the world’s most pressing challenges, while providing life-changing opportunities to a diverse and inclusive academic community through more than 200 programs of study in 17 degree-granting colleges.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Sandy Cameron
MSU Technologies
Office: (517) 884-1828


Evangelyn Alocilja
Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering

Office: (517) 355-0083

Fred Beyerlein
nanoRETE

Office: (734) 223-2591

Copyright © Michigan State University

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