Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Breakthrough in low loss high frequency carbon nanotube electronics

Abstract:
A collaboration between researchers at the University of Surrey's Advanced Technology Institute and the Faculty of Mechatronics of Warsaw University of Technology in Poland reports that low electrical loss at frequencies of up to 220 GHz are possible in screen printed carbon nanotube - polymer composites. Producing such low electrical loss materials potentially opens up new types of high frequency large area electronic devices.

Breakthrough in low loss high frequency carbon nanotube electronics

Surrey, UK | Posted on November 9th, 2011

A carbon nanotube (CNT) is a rolled up sheet of graphene that has a diameter of only a few nanometers. This size is equivalent to thousandths of the diameter of a human hair but despite their small size CNTs have outstanding properties such as high strength and an ability to carry a very high electrical current. Building upon previous EPSRC-funded research in carbon nanotube polymer composite electronics, this study, published recently in the American Institute of Physics journal Applied Physics Letters, shows that CNT composites have electrical losses of less than 0.3 dB/mm over a wide frequency range. Embedding CNTs in a polymer, in this case PMMA, allows accurate control of the nanotube content and control over the conductive phase of the composite which was screen printed into coplanar waveguides to produce structures tens of mm in length. Using a screen printing technology allows for ease of scalability for production and relaxes many of the constraints found in high end manufacturing techniques. Possible applications include new types of microwave mixers, phase shifters and antennas.

Dr David Carey from the Advanced Technology Institute of the University of Surrey said: "The success of the research is to be found by employing the unique high frequency electrical characterisation facilities at Surrey to explore electrical conduction in large area carbon nanotube based composites. Understanding what controls the conduction at the nanometer scale in these new materials can lead to the development of new high frequency carbon nanotube based electronics."

Professor Ravi Silva, Director of the Advanced Technology Institute at Surrey, said "This research shows the transformational benefits that can happen of bringing high quality specialised experimental facilities to tackle some of the key problems in modern nanotechnology and electronics. The research offers the potential for new applications of carbon nanotubes."

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
David Carey


Media Enquiries

Peter La
Press Office
University of Surrey
Tel: +44 (0)1483 689191

Copyright © University of Surrey

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

For further information please see “Electrical performance of carbon nanotube-polymer composites at frequencies up to 220 GHz” by Ali H. Alshehri, Malgorzata Jakubowska, Marcin Sloma, Michal Horaczek, Diana Rudka, Charles Free and J. David Carey, Appl. Phys. Lett., Volume 99, 153109 (2011).

Related News Press

News and information

Conductive Inks: booming to $2.8 billion by 2024 April 17th, 2014

High-temperature plasmonics eyed for solar, computer innovation April 17th, 2014

INSCX™ exchange to present Exchange trade reporting mechanism for engineered nanomaterials (NMs) to UK regulation agencies, insurers and upstream/downstream users April 17th, 2014

Transparent Conductive Films and Sensors Are Hot Segments in Printed Electronics: Start-ups in these fields show above-average momentum, while companies working on emissive displays such as OLED are fading, Lux Research says April 17th, 2014

Graphene

Thinnest feasible membrane produced April 17th, 2014

Nanotubes/Buckyballs

Effects of Carbon Nanotubes Studied on Pregnant Mothers April 12th, 2014

Nanotech Business Review 2013-2014 April 9th, 2014

Scientists Succeed in Simultaneous Determination of Acetaminophen, Codeine in Drug Samples April 9th, 2014

Rebar technique strengthens case for graphene: Rice University lab makes hybrid nanotube-graphene material that promises to simplify manufacturing April 7th, 2014

Nanoelectronics

Better solar cells, better LED light and vast optical possibilities April 12th, 2014

Catching the (Invisible) Wave: UC Santa Barbara researchers create a unique semiconductor that manipulates light in the invisible infrared/terahertz range, paving the way for new and enhanced applications April 11th, 2014

Nanotech Business Review 2013-2014 April 9th, 2014

Preview of Hands-on Nanotechnology Demos at ‘Chemistry of Wine’ Fundraiser to Show Nanotech Magic April 8th, 2014

Discoveries

Novel stapled peptide nanoparticle combination prevents RSV infection, study finds April 17th, 2014

Thinnest feasible membrane produced April 17th, 2014

More effective kidney stone treatment, from the macroscopic to the nanoscale April 17th, 2014

High-temperature plasmonics eyed for solar, computer innovation April 17th, 2014

Announcements

More effective kidney stone treatment, from the macroscopic to the nanoscale April 17th, 2014

High-temperature plasmonics eyed for solar, computer innovation April 17th, 2014

INSCX™ exchange to present Exchange trade reporting mechanism for engineered nanomaterials (NMs) to UK regulation agencies, insurers and upstream/downstream users April 17th, 2014

Transparent Conductive Films and Sensors Are Hot Segments in Printed Electronics: Start-ups in these fields show above-average momentum, while companies working on emissive displays such as OLED are fading, Lux Research says April 17th, 2014

Research partnerships

Novel stapled peptide nanoparticle combination prevents RSV infection, study finds April 17th, 2014

Scientists Capture Ultrafast Snapshots of Light-Driven Superconductivity: X-rays reveal how rapidly vanishing 'charge stripes' may be behind laser-induced high-temperature superconductivity April 16th, 2014

Scalable CVD process for making 2-D molybdenum diselenide: Rice, NTU scientists unveil CVD production for coveted 2-D semiconductor April 8th, 2014

Carbon nanotubes grow in combustion flames April 1st, 2014

Printing/Lithography/Inkjet

Conductive Inks: booming to $2.8 billion by 2024 April 17th, 2014

Transparent Conductive Films and Sensors Are Hot Segments in Printed Electronics: Start-ups in these fields show above-average momentum, while companies working on emissive displays such as OLED are fading, Lux Research says April 17th, 2014

Obducat has launched a new generation of SINDRE® Nano Imprint production system April 11th, 2014

Printed Electronics Europe - Plastic Logic shows a flexible OLED display for wearable devices April 11th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE







  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE