Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Breakthrough in low loss high frequency carbon nanotube electronics

Abstract:
A collaboration between researchers at the University of Surrey's Advanced Technology Institute and the Faculty of Mechatronics of Warsaw University of Technology in Poland reports that low electrical loss at frequencies of up to 220 GHz are possible in screen printed carbon nanotube - polymer composites. Producing such low electrical loss materials potentially opens up new types of high frequency large area electronic devices.

Breakthrough in low loss high frequency carbon nanotube electronics

Surrey, UK | Posted on November 9th, 2011

A carbon nanotube (CNT) is a rolled up sheet of graphene that has a diameter of only a few nanometers. This size is equivalent to thousandths of the diameter of a human hair but despite their small size CNTs have outstanding properties such as high strength and an ability to carry a very high electrical current. Building upon previous EPSRC-funded research in carbon nanotube polymer composite electronics, this study, published recently in the American Institute of Physics journal Applied Physics Letters, shows that CNT composites have electrical losses of less than 0.3 dB/mm over a wide frequency range. Embedding CNTs in a polymer, in this case PMMA, allows accurate control of the nanotube content and control over the conductive phase of the composite which was screen printed into coplanar waveguides to produce structures tens of mm in length. Using a screen printing technology allows for ease of scalability for production and relaxes many of the constraints found in high end manufacturing techniques. Possible applications include new types of microwave mixers, phase shifters and antennas.

Dr David Carey from the Advanced Technology Institute of the University of Surrey said: "The success of the research is to be found by employing the unique high frequency electrical characterisation facilities at Surrey to explore electrical conduction in large area carbon nanotube based composites. Understanding what controls the conduction at the nanometer scale in these new materials can lead to the development of new high frequency carbon nanotube based electronics."

Professor Ravi Silva, Director of the Advanced Technology Institute at Surrey, said "This research shows the transformational benefits that can happen of bringing high quality specialised experimental facilities to tackle some of the key problems in modern nanotechnology and electronics. The research offers the potential for new applications of carbon nanotubes."

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
David Carey


Media Enquiries

Peter La
Press Office
University of Surrey
Tel: +44 (0)1483 689191

Copyright © University of Surrey

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

For further information please see “Electrical performance of carbon nanotube-polymer composites at frequencies up to 220 GHz” by Ali H. Alshehri, Malgorzata Jakubowska, Marcin Sloma, Michal Horaczek, Diana Rudka, Charles Free and J. David Carey, Appl. Phys. Lett., Volume 99, 153109 (2011).

Related News Press

Graphene/ Graphite

Drilling speed increased by 20% – yet another upgrade in the oil & gas sector made possible by graphene nanotubes January 15th, 2019

News and information

Drilling speed increased by 20% – yet another upgrade in the oil & gas sector made possible by graphene nanotubes January 15th, 2019

Chirality in 'real-time' January 14th, 2019

New materials could help improve the performance of perovskite solar cells January 11th, 2019

Media invited to open meeting on the future of quantum technology held at RIT Jan. 23-25: Leaders from NASA, NSF, NIST and Sandia National Laboratory to attend January 11th, 2019

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes/Nanorods

Drilling speed increased by 20% – yet another upgrade in the oil & gas sector made possible by graphene nanotubes January 15th, 2019

Chemical synthesis of nanotubes: Nanometer-sized tubes made from simple benzene molecules January 11th, 2019

'Smart skin' simplifies spotting strain in structures: Rice U. invention can use fluorescing carbon nanotubes to reveal stress in aircraft, structures November 15th, 2018

Ultrasensitive toxic gas detector October 31st, 2018

Nanoelectronics

Study on low noise, high-performance transistors may bring innovations in electronics December 28th, 2018

The feature size and functional range of molecular electronic devices: Monitoring the transition from tunneling leakage current to molecular tunneling December 16th, 2018

2-D magnetism: Atom-thick platforms for energy, information and computing research: Scientists say the tiny 'spins' of electrons show potential to one day support next-generation innovations in many fields October 31st, 2018

Machine learning helps improving photonic applications September 28th, 2018

Discoveries

Chirality in 'real-time' January 14th, 2019

New materials could help improve the performance of perovskite solar cells January 11th, 2019

Spintronics 'miracle material' put to the test: Physicists build devices using mineral perovskite January 11th, 2019

Cartilage could be key to safe 'structural batteries' January 11th, 2019

Announcements

Drilling speed increased by 20% – yet another upgrade in the oil & gas sector made possible by graphene nanotubes January 15th, 2019

Chirality in 'real-time' January 14th, 2019

Spintronics 'miracle material' put to the test: Physicists build devices using mineral perovskite January 11th, 2019

Cartilage could be key to safe 'structural batteries' January 11th, 2019

Research partnerships

Chirality in 'real-time' January 14th, 2019

Ultra-sensitive sensor with gold nanoparticle array January 9th, 2019

DNA design that anyone can do: Computer program can translate a free-form 2-D drawing into a DNA structure January 4th, 2019

Revealing hidden spin: Unlocking new paths toward high-temperature superconductors: Berkeley Lab researchers uncover insights into superconductivity, leading potentially to more efficient power transmission January 4th, 2019

Printing/Lithography/Inkjet/Inks/Bio-printing

New composite advances lignin as a renewable 3D printing material December 28th, 2018

Nanoscribe Presents Successor Model Photonic Professional GT2 for High-Resolution 3D Microfabrication: The first ever production of structures in millimeter size with micrometer precision December 4th, 2018

CEA-Leti Extends 300mm Line and Adds Avenues for Developing Disruptive Technologies: Execution Relies on CEA-Leti’s Fully Implemented Technology With Module-Level Innovations & Devices and Their Architectures December 3rd, 2018

Iran Unveils Its First Homegrown 3D Nano Printer October 17th, 2018

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project