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Home > Press > Yeast Cells Wrapped in Graphene Oxide

Abstract:
Interfacing biological systems with artificial materials can bring a significant impact on the areas of single cell-based sensors, neuron-on-a-chips, and tissue engineering. In particular, graphene, which is a 2-dimensional atomic sheet of carbon, can be an interesting new addition to the field due to its superior physical, chemical, electrical, and mechanical properties.

Yeast Cells Wrapped in Graphene Oxide

Germany | Posted on November 3rd, 2011

A joint research team from the Department of Chemistry at KAIST (Daejeon, Korea) and the School of NanoBioscience and Chemical Engineering at UNIST (Ulsan, Korea) has now demonstrated an approach to functionalize living yeast cells with graphene oxide via layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly. Graphene oxide, an oxidized version of graphene, is sequentially deposited on the individual yeast cells. The viability of the cells is preserved after this procedure as thoroughly demonstrated using fluorescein diacetate assay (FDA), which is a well known microbiological method.

The field of interfacing individual living cells with nanomaterials is still in its infancy, but the results presented in this study could provide a basis for the application of biological systems to achieve biosensors or biomedical devices by taking advantage of extraordinary physical properties of graphene in combination with the versatility of LbL self-assembly.

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B. S. Kim et al., Macromol. Biosci., 2011 ; DOI: 10.1002/mabi.201100268

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