Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Sound gives nanocavity a twist

Abstract:
Researchers from Augsburg, Munich and Santa Barbara (California) successfully combined the worlds of nanophotonics and nanomechanical systems. The scientists work for the cluster of excellence Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), the Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), the Augsburg Center for Innovative Technologies (ACIT) and for the California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) at Santa Barbara.

Sound gives nanocavity a twist

Munich, Germany and Santa Barbara, CA | Posted on October 21st, 2011

NIM graduate student Daniel Fuhrmann and his supervisor Hubert Krenner demonstrate in the latest issue of Nature Photonics that a sound wave can be used to control a photonic crystal. Quantum effects within the crystal lead to an fast and very efficient generation and modulation of single photons, the quanta of light. Hubert Krenner recently established a prestigious Emmy Noether Junior Research Group at the Chair of Achim Wixforth at Augsburg University.

For their experiments the team fabricated a freestanding nanomembrane of semiconducting material. Into the membrane they drilled a large periodic array of tiny holes using cleanroom nanofabrication. In this structure, a photonic crystal, they trapped light of a well-defined wavelength or color inside a region where they skipped three holes. As light emitters they placed so-called quantum dots inside of this nanocavity. These quantum dots are often called artificial atoms because they - just like real atoms - emit light at sharp spectral lines and as single quanta (photons).

Until now the key challenge in this system was to overlap the wavelength of the light trapped in the nanocavity and the light emitted by the quantum dot. When the two wavelengths are in resonance the quantum mechanical Purcell effect leads to a dramatic increase of the light extraction efficiency. The NIM-CNSI research team solved this problem very elegantly: the scientists used a nanoquake, so-called surface acoustic waves. These waves periodically stretch and compress the thin membrane and its precisely ordered array of holes. The nanoquakes deform the photonic crystal at radio frequency and the wavelength of the light inside the nanocavity oscillates back and forth in less than a third of a nanosecond. This is more than ten times faster than any other approach worldwide.

NIM-graduate student Daniel Fuhrmann is excited about the success of his experiments: "The idea of an acoustically modulated photonic crystal existed in our lab for quite a long time. After all the hard work it made me really proud to actually see the wavelength of the nanocavity oscillating with the shaking of the nanoquake. I am also very happy that we again have shown that surface acoustic waves, our special tool in Augsburg, lead to surprising results and outstanding research also in the field of nanophotonics"

The Augsburg group is renowned for their pioneering work and application of surface acoustic waves. They apply these to various types of nanosystems ranging from biological and biophysical systems over microfluidics to fundamental physical effect such as the Quantum Hall Effect. All these experiments have attracted large attention worldwide and built the outstanding reputation of their research using their nanoquakes on a chip.

The experiment by Daniel Fuhrmann and his colleagues from Bavaria and California is an excellent example for a successful international collaboration between the two high-tech states on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. Hubert Krenner and Achim Wixforth both spent a long time at UC Santa Barbara and frequently visit their Californian colleagues. The project was seed-funded by the Bavarian-Californian Technology Center (BaCaTeC) and carried out supported by NIM within a PhD student scholarship of the Bayerische Forschungsstiftung (BFS).

Based on these groundbreaking experiments researchers expect that a highly efficient, acoustically triggered "single photon source" will be realized. Such a device is crucially required for inherently secure quantum-cryptography and the optical quantum computer.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Dr. Birgit Gebauer
Outreach Manager
Nanosystems Initiative Munich
Schellingstraße 4
80799 München, Germany
Phone: +49 (89) 2180 5091
Fax: +49 (89) 2180 5649
birgit.gebauer(at)lmu.de

Copyright © Nanosystems Initiative Munich

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related Links

Paper: D. A. Fuhrmann, Susanna M. Thon, H. Kim, D. Bouwmeester, P. M. Petroff, A. Wixforth, H. J. Krenner, Nature Photonics 5, 605–609 (2011). doi:10.1038/nphoton.2011.208

Related News Press

News and information

Terabyte Photonic Dataset Sale July 30th, 2014

Zenosense, Inc. July 29th, 2014

Optimum inertial design for self-propulsion: A new study investigates the effects of small but finite inertia on the propulsion of micro and nano-scale swimming machines July 29th, 2014

A new way to make microstructured surfaces: Method can produce strong, lightweight materials with specific surface properties July 29th, 2014

Quantum Computing

Harris & Harris Group Portfolio Company D-Wave Systems Closes a $28.4 Million Financing July 14th, 2014

Weizmann Institute scientists take another step down the long road toward quantum computers July 14th, 2014

IBM Announces $3 Billion Research Initiative to Tackle Chip Grand Challenges for Cloud and Big Data Systems: Scientists and engineers to push limits of silicon technology to 7 nanometers and below and create post-silicon future July 10th, 2014

From pencil marks to quantum computers: Introducing graphene July 5th, 2014

Optical Computing

NUS scientists use low cost technique to improve properties and functions of nanomaterials: By 'drawing' micropatterns on nanomaterials using a focused laser beam, scientists could modify properties of nanomaterials for effective applications in photonic and optoelectric applicat July 22nd, 2014

New NIST metamaterial gives light a one-way ticket July 2nd, 2014

Don't blink! NIST studies why quantum dots suffer from 'fluorescence intermittency' May 22nd, 2014

Scientists in Singapore develop novel ultra-fast electrical circuits using light-generated tunneling currents April 10th, 2014

Discoveries

Tough foam from tiny sheets: Rice University lab uses atom-thick materials to make ultralight foam July 29th, 2014

Zenosense, Inc. July 29th, 2014

Optimum inertial design for self-propulsion: A new study investigates the effects of small but finite inertia on the propulsion of micro and nano-scale swimming machines July 29th, 2014

A new way to make microstructured surfaces: Method can produce strong, lightweight materials with specific surface properties July 29th, 2014

Announcements

Terabyte Photonic Dataset Sale July 30th, 2014

Zenosense, Inc. July 29th, 2014

Optimum inertial design for self-propulsion: A new study investigates the effects of small but finite inertia on the propulsion of micro and nano-scale swimming machines July 29th, 2014

A new way to make microstructured surfaces: Method can produce strong, lightweight materials with specific surface properties July 29th, 2014

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

Terabyte Photonic Dataset Sale July 30th, 2014

NUS scientists use low cost technique to improve properties and functions of nanomaterials: By 'drawing' micropatterns on nanomaterials using a focused laser beam, scientists could modify properties of nanomaterials for effective applications in photonic and optoelectric applicat July 22nd, 2014

Carbyne morphs when stretched: Rice University calculations show carbon-atom chain would go metal to semiconductor July 21st, 2014

Tiny laser sensor heightens bomb detection sensitivity July 19th, 2014

Research partnerships

Breakthrough laser experiment reveals liquid-like motion of atoms in an ultra-cold cluster: University of Leicester research team unlocks insights into creation of new nano-materials July 25th, 2014

A*STAR and industry form S$200M semiconductor R&D July 25th, 2014

A Crystal Wedding in the Nanocosmos July 23rd, 2014

Penn Study: Understanding Graphene’s Electrical Properties on an Atomic Level July 22nd, 2014

Quantum nanoscience

Measuring the Smallest Magnets July 28th, 2014

Physicists Use Computer Models to Reveal Quantum Effects in Biological Oxygen Transport: The team solved a long-standing question by explaining why oxygen – and not deadly carbon monoxide – preferably binds to the proteins that transport it around the body. July 17th, 2014

Bending the rules: A UCSB postdoctoral scholar in physics discovers a counterintuitive phenomenon: the coexistence of superconductivity with dissipation June 29th, 2014

Singapore Researchers Use FEI Titan S/TEM to Link Plasmonics with Molecular Electronics: As described in the March 28 issue of Science, researchers discover quantum plasmonic tunneling – a phenomenon that may eventually lead to new, ultra-fast electrical circuits June 24th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE