Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Saarbrücken material scientist wins national competition for best nanotechnology photo

With the help of laser beams material scientists from Saarbrücken have made nanotubes grown on a silicium plate and have generated structures that look under the scanning electron microscope as a jellyfish in the sea. For this picture, the researchers received the highest award in the nationwide photography competition "Nano sichtbar machen", which means "Make Nano visible". Picture: "Nicolas Souza/cc-NanoBioNet e.V."
With the help of laser beams material scientists from Saarbrücken have made nanotubes grown on a silicium plate and have generated structures that look under the scanning electron microscope as a jellyfish in the sea. For this picture, the researchers received the highest award in the nationwide photography competition "Nano sichtbar machen", which means "Make Nano visible". Picture: "Nicolas Souza/cc-NanoBioNet e.V."

Abstract:
Considered by some to be the "magic bullet" of materials science, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are at the forefront of materials research around the world. Carbon nanotubes are not only extremely stable, they are also excellent conductors of electrical energy and are made from a cheap raw material. Researchers at Saarland University want to use these highly versatile materials to help replace expensive precious metals in electrical contacts by cheaper alternatives such as nickel. By coating these replacement metals with nanotubes they hope to be able to prevent oxidation of the metal surface and thus avoid any associated reduction in electrical conductivity. By using lasers to help grow nanotubes on a silicon plate, the researchers in Saarbrücken have created structures that, when viewed under a scanning electron microscope, resemble a jellyfish in the ocean. This image was recently awarded first prize in the national photo competition "Making Nano Visible".

Saarbrücken material scientist wins national competition for best nanotechnology photo

Saarbrücken, Germany | Posted on October 5th, 2011

The competition was initiated by the three nanotechnology networks NanoBioNet, ASeNT-D and CeNTech. The €1000 prize will be awarded today at the WING.DE nanotechnology conference organized by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) in Berlin.

Pencils contain graphite, and graphite consists of carbon atoms aligned in layers. When we use a pencil for writing, these carbon atoms get deposited layer by layer. Nanotubes are essentially two-dimensional arrays of carbon atoms that have been rolled up as you would roll up a sheet of paper. "The result is tubes with a diameter of only ten nanometres, that is some 5000 times thinner than a human hair.

These nanotubes are extremely stable and are also excellent conductors of electrical energy," explains Nicolas Souza, doctoral student at the Department of Functional Materials headed by Professor Frank Mücklich. The challenge at present is to grow these nanotubes in a controlled way, such as depositing them as a lawn-like structure with the nanotubes attached to a contact surface. "We take a carbon mixture and by firing a laser at it we can raise the temperature of the target to about 6000° causing it to vaporize at that point. The vaporized carbon atoms deposit on a nickel-coated silicon plate located below and grow to form nanotubes that rise up from the plate. The nickel merely acts as a catalyst and is not consumed in the process. Viewed under a scanning electron microscope, the final product has the appearance of a jellyfish containing a red nickel core," says Souza. His aim now is to try and establish even greater control over the growth process.

The Saarbrücken researchers want to use the carbon nanotubes to replace the precious metals used in electrical contacts by cheaper alternatives such as nickel or copper. Up until now the problem has been that these metals tend to oxidize rapidly. Oxidation causes a deterioration in their surface properties and causes a significant reduction in their electrical conductivity. "If we can get the nanotubes to completely cover the surface of the metal then the nanotubes will act like the bristles of an upturned brush and will be able to penetrate the oxidation layer. This would give us improved electrical contact and the contact would be significantly more stable and more conductive than those produced by conventional means," explains Frank Mücklich, materials scientist at Saarland University and Director of the Steinbeis Material Engineering Center Saarland (MECS). This kind of technique would allow solar collectors to be designed much more efficiently or could enable the production of new products such as ultrathin and flexible computer screens.

In their search for new materials, the researchers in Professor Mücklich's team make use of a variety of laser techniques and 3D visualisation procedures, such as nanotomography. The Department of Functional Materials also recently took delivery of an atomic probe with which materials can be examined at the atomic scale and the results imaged in three dimensions.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Gordon Bolduan

Copyright © AlphaGalileo

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Iranian Researchers Planning to Produce Edible Insulin January 28th, 2015

Nanoparticles that deliver oligonucleotide drugs into cells described in Nucleic Acid Therapeutics January 28th, 2015

'Bulletproof' battery: Kevlar membrane for safer, thinner lithium rechargeables January 28th, 2015

Spider electro-combs its sticky nano-filaments January 28th, 2015

Nanotubes/Buckyballs

Chromium-centered cycloparaphenylene rings for making functionalized nanocarbons January 26th, 2015

GS7 Graphene Sensor maybe Solution in Fight Against Cancer January 25th, 2015

Toyocolor to Launch New Carbon Nanotube Materials at nano tech 2015 January 24th, 2015

Carbon nanotube finding could lead to flexible electronics with longer battery life January 14th, 2015

Announcements

Iranian Researchers Planning to Produce Edible Insulin January 28th, 2015

Nanoparticles that deliver oligonucleotide drugs into cells described in Nucleic Acid Therapeutics January 28th, 2015

'Bulletproof' battery: Kevlar membrane for safer, thinner lithium rechargeables January 28th, 2015

Spider electro-combs its sticky nano-filaments January 28th, 2015

Human Interest/Art

OCSiAl supports NanoART Imagery Contest January 23rd, 2015

EnvisioNano: An image contest hosted by the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) January 22nd, 2015

Oxford Instruments Asylum Research Announces AFM Image Contest Winners January 11th, 2015

Longhorn beetle inspires ink to fight counterfeiting November 5th, 2014

Grants/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

OCSiAl supports NanoART Imagery Contest January 23rd, 2015

EnvisioNano: An image contest hosted by the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) January 22nd, 2015

Laser-generated surface structures create extremely water-repellent metals: Super-hydrophobic properties could lead to applications in solar panels, sanitation and as rust-free metals January 20th, 2015

NREL Scientist Brian Gregg Named AAAS Fellow: Gregg honored for distinguished contributions to the field of organic solar photoconversion January 20th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2015 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE