Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > The White House has named a pair of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers and a recent alumnus to a list of the country's most promising researchers

Abstract:
The White House has named a pair of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers and a recent alumnus to a list of the country's most promising researchers.

The White House has named a pair of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers and a recent alumnus to a list of the country's most promising researchers

Madison, WI | Posted on October 2nd, 2011

Materials science and engineering professor Michael Arnold, chemistry professor Daniel Fredrickson, and UW-Madison graduate Samuel Zelinka - now a researcher at the USDA's Forest Products Laboratory in Madison - are among just 94 recipients of Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers.

The Early Career Awards program was established in 1996 to encourage the development of scientists and engineers embarking on their independent careers. The directors of federal agencies that fund research select finalists for the awards, which are passed on to the White House.

"I'm honored personally, but I'm very happy for our research group," says Fredrickson, who is one of 13 scientists nominated by the Department of Energy. "We're working in an under-populated area of research - in the United States, at least. So it's nice to see the hard work of my students recognized, when they may be asking themselves, 'Who else is working on this?'"

Nominated by the Department of Defense along with 15 other winners, Arnold drew additional funds to bring his work with carbon nano-materials in new applications.

"It speaks to the fantastic support that I've received from my colleagues and the university," he says. "Both have been instrumental to the successes of my career."

Arnold has studied carbon nanotubes for, among other things, their use in electricity-generating solar cells.

"We've been doing more fundamental science so far," says Arnold, who joined the UW-Madison faculty in 2008 after earning a doctorate from Northwestern University and doing postdoctoral research at Michigan. "The Department of Defense is interested in making new light-emitting and -detecting devices from our carbon materials."

Those materials could be used to make infrared light connections between computer chips that would enable faster transmission of information than physical connections - wires, that is - allow for. He may also have the right ingredients for far more sensitive infrared detectors.

"It will allow us to push our efforts to the next level," Arnold says. "You can have all the good ideas you want, but without support like this you can't take them anywhere."

Fredrickson, who came to Madison in 2009 from the University of Stockholm and after earning his doctorate at Cornell, studies the bonds formed between metals mixed together - as in the formation of an alloy.

"Those bonds can be relatively simple, where one metal is substituted into the regular structure of another," he says. "Or there can be a hugely complex new structure, sometimes tens of thousands of molecules in an arrangement that repeats over and over."

Fredrickson's lab puts groups of elements through what they call "chemical frustration," a forced marriage of sorts.

"We watch that frustration to try to understand how the two metals chose their inter-metallic structures," he says. "If we can control that, we can create new materials tailored to special needs."

The new materials could improve hydrogen storage, aid in superconductivity and improve catalysis ( controlling reactions between other compounds ).

Zelinka, who earned a doctorate from UW-Madison's College of Engineering in 2009, is a research materials engineer at the Forest Products Lab. He studies the corrosion of metals in wood and the way wood reacts to water, developing quicker ways to evaluate metal fasteners coexist with new preservatives used to treat wood.

The three Madison scientists will join the rest of the Early Career Award winners for a ceremony with President Barack Obama at the White House.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Chris Barncard
608-890-0465


Jim Beal
608-263-0611

Copyright © University of Wisconsin-Madison

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water March 18th, 2019

Review of the recent advances of 2D nanomaterials in Lit-ion batteries March 15th, 2019

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Exotic “second sound” phenomenon observed in pencil lead: At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports March 15th, 2019

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Exotic “second sound” phenomenon observed in pencil lead: At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports March 15th, 2019

Researchers reverse the flow of time on IBM's quantum computer March 14th, 2019

When semiconductors stick together, materials go quantum: A new study led by Berkeley Lab reveals how aligned layers of atomically thin semiconductors can yield an exotic new quantum material March 12th, 2019

Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals Begins Dosing in Phase 1 Study of ARO-APOC3 for Treatment of Hypertriglyceridemia March 11th, 2019

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes/Nanorods

Now made in Japan – Asian battery manufacturers welcome highly conductive nanotube additive March 7th, 2019

Straightforward biosynthesis of functional bulk nanocomposites February 5th, 2019

Drilling speed increased by 20% – yet another upgrade in the oil & gas sector made possible by graphene nanotubes January 15th, 2019

Chemical synthesis of nanotubes: Nanometer-sized tubes made from simple benzene molecules January 11th, 2019

Announcements

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water March 18th, 2019

Review of the recent advances of 2D nanomaterials in Lit-ion batteries March 15th, 2019

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force Nanoscientists discover new mechanism to cleave cellulose effectively and in an environmentally friendly way March 15th, 2019

Exotic “second sound” phenomenon observed in pencil lead: At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports March 15th, 2019

Energy

Layering titanium oxide's different mineral forms for better solar cells: Kanazawa University-led researchers layer two different mineral forms of titanium oxide to improve electron flow at the negative electrode for better metal halide perovskite-type solar cells March 2nd, 2019

New blueprint for understanding, predicting and optimizing complex nanoparticles: Guidelines have the potential to transform the fields of optoelectronics, bio-imaging and energy harvesting March 1st, 2019

Avoiding the Crack of Doom: New imaging technique reveals how mechanical damage begins at the molecular scale February 25th, 2019

High-speed surveillance in solar cells catches recombination red-handed: Researchers at Osaka University introduce a new time-resolved microscopy method that allows them to monitor the trajectories of fast-moving charged particles at unprecedented rates February 21st, 2019

Grants/Sponsored Research/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Quantum sensing method measures minuscule magnetic fields: MIT researchers find a new way to make nanoscale measurements of fields in more than one dimension March 15th, 2019

Researchers reverse the flow of time on IBM's quantum computer March 14th, 2019

Pushing Past Limits: Junkai Jiang receives prestigious Ph.D. Student Fellowship from IEEE Electron Devices Society March 14th, 2019

When semiconductors stick together, materials go quantum: A new study led by Berkeley Lab reveals how aligned layers of atomically thin semiconductors can yield an exotic new quantum material March 12th, 2019

Solar/Photovoltaic

Layering titanium oxide's different mineral forms for better solar cells: Kanazawa University-led researchers layer two different mineral forms of titanium oxide to improve electron flow at the negative electrode for better metal halide perovskite-type solar cells March 2nd, 2019

High-speed surveillance in solar cells catches recombination red-handed: Researchers at Osaka University introduce a new time-resolved microscopy method that allows them to monitor the trajectories of fast-moving charged particles at unprecedented rates February 21st, 2019

Exotic spiraling electrons discovered by physicists: Rutgers-led research could lead to advances in lighting and solar cells February 18th, 2019

Self-assembling nanomaterial offers pathway to more efficient, affordable harnessing of solar power: The new materials produce a singlet fission reaction that creates more and extends the life of harvestable electronic charges January 24th, 2019

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project