Nanotechnology Now





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Responsive Labels for Cells

Abstract:
How do you stick a label on something as small as a cell? Cell-labeling techniques are explained, and the use of polymer-coated nanoparticles as environment-sensitive cell labels is demonstrated by scientists in Germany and Australia.

Responsive Labels for Cells

Melbourne, Australia and Marburg, Germany | Posted on September 22nd, 2011

Many scientists are rising to the challenge of effective cell labeling by using nanoparticles as labels; these labels may be either fluorescent, magnetic, or radioactive. Nanoparticles are ideal for this purpose because they are smaller than a cell and can be taken up via the cell machinery and they can be made biocompatible. Nanoparticles can also have properties that make them easily observed from the outside, like fluorescence or magnetism. However water-soluble nanoparticles are not easy to make on a large scale, which can limit their use.

Paul Mulvaney (University of Melbourne, Australia), Wolfgang Parak (Philipps University of Marburg, Germany), and co-workers have reviewed attempts to date to make many sorts of nanoparticles soluble in water. They describe different approaches taken by various scientists, including ligand exchange and encapsulation.

Ligand exchange is useful because the smallest water-soluble nanoparticles can be made in this way, but it can reduce the quantum yield of fluorescent particles and the stability of all particles. This method can, however, be very useful to introduce new functional groups to the particle surface.

Encapsulation of nanoparticles with silica or polymers is another approach to increasing their water-solubility. Growing a silica shell around the particle adds both solubility and chemical functionality, but involves a complex procedure, whereas surrounding the nanoparticle with a layer of polymer that is attracted to both water and the particle can be relatively straightforward to achieve by self-assembly and the procedure does not change much for different particles, which makes it universal. Polymer-coated nanoparticles are very stable, but larger than those produced by ligand exchange.

The researchers don't stop there; they expand upon work they've done using polymer-coated nanoparticles to make sense of cell behavior. In particular, if a pH-sensitive and fluorescent polymer is chosen to coat the nanoparticles, then information can be gleaned about uptake into cells of the particle and any changes in the environment once it is there. So scientists truly can put responsive labels into cells, which should enable us to understand cell behavior better in the future.

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © Wiley-VCH Materials Science Journals

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Nanostructures Increase Corrosion Resistance in Metallic Body Implants May 24th, 2015

Iranian Scientists Use Magnetic Field to Transfer Anticancer Drug to Tumor Tissue May 24th, 2015

Basel physicists develop efficient method of signal transmission from nanocomponents May 23rd, 2015

This Slinky lookalike 'hyperlens' helps us see tiny objects: The photonics advancement could improve early cancer detection, nanoelectronics manufacturing and scientists' ability to observe single molecules May 23rd, 2015

Nanomedicine

Nanostructures Increase Corrosion Resistance in Metallic Body Implants May 24th, 2015

Iranian Scientists Use Magnetic Field to Transfer Anticancer Drug to Tumor Tissue May 24th, 2015

New Antibacterial Wound Dressing in Iran Can Display Replacement Time May 22nd, 2015

Researchers develop new way to manufacture nanofibers May 21st, 2015

Discoveries

Nanostructures Increase Corrosion Resistance in Metallic Body Implants May 24th, 2015

Iranian Scientists Use Magnetic Field to Transfer Anticancer Drug to Tumor Tissue May 24th, 2015

Basel physicists develop efficient method of signal transmission from nanocomponents May 23rd, 2015

This Slinky lookalike 'hyperlens' helps us see tiny objects: The photonics advancement could improve early cancer detection, nanoelectronics manufacturing and scientists' ability to observe single molecules May 23rd, 2015

Announcements

Nanostructures Increase Corrosion Resistance in Metallic Body Implants May 24th, 2015

Iranian Scientists Use Magnetic Field to Transfer Anticancer Drug to Tumor Tissue May 24th, 2015

Basel physicists develop efficient method of signal transmission from nanocomponents May 23rd, 2015

This Slinky lookalike 'hyperlens' helps us see tiny objects: The photonics advancement could improve early cancer detection, nanoelectronics manufacturing and scientists' ability to observe single molecules May 23rd, 2015

Nanobiotechnology

This Slinky lookalike 'hyperlens' helps us see tiny objects: The photonics advancement could improve early cancer detection, nanoelectronics manufacturing and scientists' ability to observe single molecules May 23rd, 2015

Supercomputer unlocks secrets of plant cells to pave the way for more resilient crops: IBM partners with University of Melbourne and UQ May 21st, 2015

Researchers develop new way to manufacture nanofibers May 21st, 2015

Nature inspires first artificial molecular pump: Simple design mimics pumping mechanism of life-sustaining proteins found in living cells May 19th, 2015

Research partnerships

Supercomputer unlocks secrets of plant cells to pave the way for more resilient crops: IBM partners with University of Melbourne and UQ May 21st, 2015

Taking control of light emission: Researchers find a way of tuning light waves by pairing 2 exotic 2-D materials May 20th, 2015

Efficiency record for black silicon solar cells jumps to 22.1 percent: Aalto University's researchers improved their previous record by over 3 absolute percents in cooperation with Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya May 18th, 2015

Organic nanoparticles, more lethal to tumors: Carbon-based nanoparticles could be used to sensitize cancerous tumors to proton radiotherapy and induce more focused destruction of cancer cells, a new study shows May 18th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project