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Home > Press > SwRI Receives $4.4 Million Contract to Develop a Drug Formulation and Delivery System to Treat Cyanide Exposure

Abstract:
Southwest Research Institute was awarded a $4.4 million contract from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority to develop a nasal-delivery, first-line treatment system to combat cyanide poisoning.

SwRI Receives $4.4 Million Contract to Develop a Drug Formulation and Delivery System to Treat Cyanide Exposure

San Antonio, TX | Posted on September 17th, 2011

Current treatments approved by the Food and Drug Administration for cyanide poisoning must be administered intravenously by qualified medical personnel. The development of a nasal formulation could potentially save lives by allowing a metered dosage to be administered immediately in the field.

"The goal of this effort is to successfully develop a supply and nasal formulation of amyl nitrite," said Dr. Joe McDonough, principal investigator and director of SwRI's Microencapsulation and Nanomaterials Department. "Amyl nitrite is relatively low cost, easily administered and broadly effective.

"Amyl nitrite can be administered intra-nasally by an individual to rapidly treat large numbers of casualties quickly and effectively. The amyl nitrite, supplied in a simple nasal delivery system, could easily be used to treat numerous victims by simple nasal instillation, and is very well suited even for self administration."

The Institute will demonstrate the safety and efficacy against cyanide exposure in two animal models to clarify a development strategy for amyl nitrite with the FDA.

The contract, awarded August 30, has a 15-month base period through December 2012 with options to extend an additional 4 years and up to $21 million.

For more information about medicinal chemistry and drug development at SwRI, please visit microencapsulation.swri.org.

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About Southwest Research Institute
SwRI is an independent, nonprofit, applied research and development organization based in San Antonio, Texas, with more than 3,000 employees and an annual research volume of more than $548 million. Southwest Research Institute and SwRI are registered marks in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Southwest Research Institute
Tracey M.S. Whelan
210-522-2256

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