Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > How to grow wires and tiny plates Liquid processing method developed at MIT can control the shapes of nanowires and produce complete electronic devices

Nanostructures are directly synthesized in parallel microfluidic channels (held by the metal frame) by flowing special chemical reactant solution through the tubing. The microfluidic not only creates the functional device, but is also the final packaged functional LED device itself.
Photo: Jaebum Joo
Nanostructures are directly synthesized in parallel microfluidic channels (held by the metal frame) by flowing special chemical reactant solution through the tubing. The microfluidic not only creates the functional device, but is also the final packaged functional LED device itself. Photo: Jaebum Joo

Abstract:
Researchers at MIT have found a way to control precisely the shapes of submicroscopic wires deposited from a solution — using a method that makes it possible to produce entire electronic devices through a liquid-based process.

How to grow wires and tiny plates Liquid processing method developed at MIT can control the shapes of nanowires and produce complete electronic devices

Cambridge, MA | Posted on July 14th, 2011

The team demonstrated the technique by producing a functional light-emitting diode (LED) array made of zinc oxide nanowires in a single beaker, instead of the several separate steps and devices required for conventional production. They were able to do so under relatively benign conditions, with moderate temperatures and no vacuum needed.

Unlike larger structures, with nanomaterials — those with dimensions measured in nanometers, or billionths of a meter — differences in shape can lead to dramatic differences in behavior. "For nanostructures, there's a coupling between the geometry and the electrical and optical properties," explains Brian Chow, a postdoc at MIT and co-author of a paper describing the results that was published July 10 in the journal Nature Materials. "Being able to tune the geometry is very powerful," he says. The system Chow and his colleagues developed can precisely control the aspect ratio (the ratio of length to width) of the nanowires to produce anything from flat plates to long thin wires.

There are other ways of making such nanowires, Chow says. "People have done a good job of controlling the morphology of wires by other means — using high temperatures, high pressure, or subtractive processing. But to be able to do this under these benign conditions is attractive," because it makes it possible to integrate such devices with relatively fragile materials such as polymers and plastics, he says.

Control over the shapes of the wires has until now been essentially a trial-and-error process. "We were trying to find out what is the controlling factor," explains Jaebum Joo PhD '10, who was the lead author of the paper.

The key turns out to be the electrostatic properties of the zinc oxide material as it grows from a solution, they found. Different compounds, when added to the solution, attach themselves electrostatically only to certain parts of the wire — just to the sides, or just to the ends — inhibiting the wire's growth in those directions. The amount of inhibition depends on the specific properties of the added compounds.

While this work was done with zinc oxide nanowires — a promising material that is being widely studied by researchers — the MIT scientists believe the method they developed for controlling the shape of the wires "can be expanded to different material systems," Joo says, perhaps including titanium dioxide which is being investigated for devices such as solar cells. Because the benign assembly conditions allow the material to be deposited on plastic surfaces, he says, it might enable the development of flexible display panels, for example.

But there are also many potential applications using the zinc oxide material itself, including the production of batteries, sensors, and optical devices. And the processing method has "the potential for large-scale manufacturing," Joo says.

The team also hopes to be able to use the method to make "spatially complex devices from the bottom up, out of biocompatible polymers." These could be used, for example, to make tiny devices that could be implanted in the brain to provide both sensing and stimulation.

In addition to Joo and Chow, the research was carried out by visiting scholar Manu Prakesh, along with Media Lab associate professors Edward Boyden and Joseph Jacobson. It was funded by the MIT Center for Bits and Atoms; the MIT Media Lab; the Korea Foundation for Advanced Studies; Samsung Electronics; the Harvard Society of Fellows; the Wallace H. Coulter Early Career Award; the NARSAD Young Investigator Award; the National Science Foundation; and the NIH Director's New Innovator Award.

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © MIT

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Light pulses control graphene's electrical behavior: Finding could allow ultrafast switching of conduction, and possibly lead to new broadband light sensors August 1st, 2014

President Obama Meets U.S. Laureates of 2014 Kavli Prizes August 1st, 2014

Stanford researchers seek 'Holy Grail' in battery design: Pure lithium anode closer to reality with development of protective layer of interconnected carbon domes August 1st, 2014

Air Force’s 30-year plan seeks 'strategic agility' August 1st, 2014

Display technology/LEDs/SS Lighting/OLEDs

Martini Tech Inc. becomes the exclusive distributor for Yoshioka Seiko Co. porous chucks for Europe and North America July 20th, 2014

Carbodeon enables 20 percent increase in polymer thermal filler conductivity with 0.03 wt.% nanodiamond additive at a lower cost than with traditional fillers: Improved materials and processes enable nanodiamond cost reductions of up to 70 percent for electronics and LED app July 9th, 2014

'Nano-pixels' promise thin, flexible, high resolution displays July 9th, 2014

Projecting a Three-Dimensional Future: TAU researchers develop holography technology that could change the way we view the world July 9th, 2014

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Light pulses control graphene's electrical behavior: Finding could allow ultrafast switching of conduction, and possibly lead to new broadband light sensors August 1st, 2014

President Obama Meets U.S. Laureates of 2014 Kavli Prizes August 1st, 2014

Stanford researchers seek 'Holy Grail' in battery design: Pure lithium anode closer to reality with development of protective layer of interconnected carbon domes August 1st, 2014

Air Force’s 30-year plan seeks 'strategic agility' August 1st, 2014

Sensors

Light pulses control graphene's electrical behavior: Finding could allow ultrafast switching of conduction, and possibly lead to new broadband light sensors August 1st, 2014

Production of Toxic Gas Sensor Based on Nanorods July 28th, 2014

Compact Vibration Harvester Power Supply with Highest Efficiency Opens Door to “Fix-and-Forget” Sensor Nodes July 23rd, 2014

Nano-sized Chip "Sniffs Out" Explosives Far Better than Trained Dogs: TAU researcher's groundbreaking sensor detects miniscule concentrations of hazardous materials in the air July 23rd, 2014

Nanoelectronics

A*STAR and industry form S$200M semiconductor R&D July 25th, 2014

A Crystal Wedding in the Nanocosmos July 23rd, 2014

3-D nanostructure could benefit nanoelectronics, gas storage: Rice U. researchers predict functional advantages of 3-D boron nitride July 15th, 2014

IBM Announces $3 Billion Research Initiative to Tackle Chip Grand Challenges for Cloud and Big Data Systems: Scientists and engineers to push limits of silicon technology to 7 nanometers and below and create post-silicon future July 10th, 2014

Discoveries

Iranian Scientists Produce Cobalt–Alumina Ceramic Nano Inks August 1st, 2014

Light pulses control graphene's electrical behavior: Finding could allow ultrafast switching of conduction, and possibly lead to new broadband light sensors August 1st, 2014

Taking the guesswork out of cancer therapy: New molecular test kit predicts patient’s survival and drug response August 1st, 2014

Carnegie Mellon Chemists Create Nanofibers Using Unprecedented New Method July 31st, 2014

Announcements

Light pulses control graphene's electrical behavior: Finding could allow ultrafast switching of conduction, and possibly lead to new broadband light sensors August 1st, 2014

President Obama Meets U.S. Laureates of 2014 Kavli Prizes August 1st, 2014

Stanford researchers seek 'Holy Grail' in battery design: Pure lithium anode closer to reality with development of protective layer of interconnected carbon domes August 1st, 2014

Air Force’s 30-year plan seeks 'strategic agility' August 1st, 2014

Battery Technology/Capacitors/Generators/Piezoelectrics/Thermoelectrics

Stanford researchers seek 'Holy Grail' in battery design: Pure lithium anode closer to reality with development of protective layer of interconnected carbon domes August 1st, 2014

Tough foam from tiny sheets: Rice University lab uses atom-thick materials to make ultralight foam July 29th, 2014

Stanford team achieves 'holy grail' of battery design: A stable lithium anode - Engineers use carbon nanospheres to protect lithium from the reactive and expansive problems that have restricted its use as an anode July 27th, 2014

Nano-supercapacitors for electric cars July 25th, 2014

Photonics/Optics/Lasers

Light pulses control graphene's electrical behavior: Finding could allow ultrafast switching of conduction, and possibly lead to new broadband light sensors August 1st, 2014

Pressure probing potential photoelectronic manufacturing compound July 31st, 2014

From Narrow to Broad July 30th, 2014

Terabyte Photonic Dataset Sale July 30th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE