Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > University of Houston develops method for creating single-crystal arrays of graphene: New method marks advance in efforts to develop a replacement for silicon in high-performance electronics

Abstract:
University of Houston researchers have developed a method for creating single-crystal arrays of the material graphene, an advance that opens the possibility of a replacement for silicon in high-performance computers and electronics. The work by UH researchers and their collaborators is featured on the cover of the June issue of Nature Materials.

University of Houston develops method for creating single-crystal arrays of graphene: New method marks advance in efforts to develop a replacement for silicon in high-performance electronics

Houston, TX | Posted on June 2nd, 2011

Graphene is a one-atom-thick layer of carbon that was first fabricated in 2004. Single-crystal arrays of the material could be used to create a new class of high-speed transistors and integrated circuits that use less energy than silicon electronics because graphene conducts electricity with little resistance or heat generation.

But the industry needs a reliable and defect-free method for manufacturing large quantities of single crystals of graphene. The development reported in Nature Materials marks a step towards perfecting such a method.

"Using these seeds, we can grow an ordered array of thousands or millions of single crystals of graphene," said Qingkai Yu, the paper's first author. Yu developed the single-crystal growth process at the UH Center for Advanced Materials (CAM), where he was a research assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering.

"We hope the industry will look at these findings and consider the ordered arrays as a possible means of fabricating electronic devices," said Yu, who is now an assistant professor at Texas State University in San Marcos and remains a project leader at CAM.

Yu and Steven Pei, UH professor of electrical and computer engineering and CAM's deputy director, invented the graphene seeded-growth technique that UH patented in 2010.

"There is still a long way to go. However, this development makes the fabrication of integrated circuits with graphene transistors possible. This may actually be the first viable integrated circuit technology based on nano-electronics," Pei said.

Yong P. Chen, an assistant professor of nanoscience and physics at Purdue University, was the paper's co-corresponding author.

At CAM, single-crystal graphene arrays were grown on top of a copper foil inside a chamber containing methane gas using a process called chemical vapor deposition. This process was pioneered by Yu at CAM in 2008 and is now widely accepted as the standard method to create large-area graphene films for potential applications in touch-screen displays, e-books and solar cells.

"Graphene isn't there yet, in terms of high quality mass production like silicon, but this is a very important step in that direction," said Chen, who led the graphene characterization efforts at Purdue.

In addition to Yu and Pei, UH graduate students Wei Wu and Zhihua Su, postdoctoral researchers Zhihong Liu and Peng Peng and assistant professor Jiming Bao along with Chen and nine other researchers from Purdue University, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratories and Carl Zeiss SMT Inc. co-authored the paper.

Last year, two scientists received the Nobel Prize in physics for discovering graphene. At that time, Yu was working at CAM to develop ways to produce mass quantities of high-quality graphene.

The findings reported in Nature Materials demonstrated that researchers could control the growth of the ordered arrays. The researchers also were the first to demonstrate the electronic properties of individual grain boundaries.

The research was supported through a variety of funding sources, including the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy, the Department of Homeland Security, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, IBM Inc., the Welch Foundation, the Miller Family Endowment and Midwest Institute for Nanoelectronics Discovery.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Laura Tolley

713-743-0778

Copyright © University of Houston

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

CWRU researchers efficiently charge a lithium-ion battery with solar cell: Coupling with perovskite solar cell holds potential for cleaner cars and more August 27th, 2015

Successful boron-doping of graphene nanoribbon August 27th, 2015

Nanolab Technologies LEAPS Forward with High-Performance Analysis Services to the World: Nanolab Orders Advanced Local Electrode Atom Probe (LEAP®) Microscope from CAMECA Unit of AMETEK Materials Analysis Division August 27th, 2015

National Space Society Welcomes Janet Ivey As New NSS Governor: Janet Ivey of Janet's Planet is NOW IN ORBIT as a member of the Board of Governors of the National Space Society August 27th, 2015

Graphene

Successful boron-doping of graphene nanoribbon August 27th, 2015

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

These microscopic fish are 3-D-printed to do more than swim: Researchers demonstrate a novel method to build microscopic robots with complex shapes and functionalities August 26th, 2015

Glitter from silver lights up Alzheimer's dark secrets August 25th, 2015

Southampton scientists find new way to detect ortho-para conversion in water August 25th, 2015

Industrial Nanotech, Inc. Provides Update On Hospital Project, PCAOB Audit, and New Heat Shield™ Line August 24th, 2015

Chip Technology

Nanometrics to Participate in the Citi 2015 Global Technology Conference August 26th, 2015

Kwansei Gakuin University in Hyogo, Japan, uses Raman microscopy to study crystallographic defects in silicon carbide wafers August 25th, 2015

A little light interaction leaves quantum physicists beaming August 25th, 2015

'Magic' sphere for information transfer: Professor at the Lomonosov Moscow State University made the «magic» sphere for information transfer August 24th, 2015

Nanoelectronics

Nanotechnology that will impact the Security & Defense sectors to be discussed at NanoSD2015 conference August 25th, 2015

'Quantum dot' technology may help light the future August 19th, 2015

Surprising discoveries about 2-D molybdenum disulfide: Berkeley Lab researchers use award-winning campanile probe on promising semiconductor August 15th, 2015

Better together: Graphene-nanotube hybrid switches August 3rd, 2015

Discoveries

CWRU researchers efficiently charge a lithium-ion battery with solar cell: Coupling with perovskite solar cell holds potential for cleaner cars and more August 27th, 2015

Successful boron-doping of graphene nanoribbon August 27th, 2015

These microscopic fish are 3-D-printed to do more than swim: Researchers demonstrate a novel method to build microscopic robots with complex shapes and functionalities August 26th, 2015

Researchers combine disciplines, computational programs to determine atomic structure August 26th, 2015

Announcements

CWRU researchers efficiently charge a lithium-ion battery with solar cell: Coupling with perovskite solar cell holds potential for cleaner cars and more August 27th, 2015

Successful boron-doping of graphene nanoribbon August 27th, 2015

Nanolab Technologies LEAPS Forward with High-Performance Analysis Services to the World: Nanolab Orders Advanced Local Electrode Atom Probe (LEAP®) Microscope from CAMECA Unit of AMETEK Materials Analysis Division August 27th, 2015

National Space Society Welcomes Janet Ivey As New NSS Governor: Janet Ivey of Janet's Planet is NOW IN ORBIT as a member of the Board of Governors of the National Space Society August 27th, 2015

Military

These microscopic fish are 3-D-printed to do more than swim: Researchers demonstrate a novel method to build microscopic robots with complex shapes and functionalities August 26th, 2015

Nanotechnology that will impact the Security & Defense sectors to be discussed at NanoSD2015 conference August 25th, 2015

Industrial Nanotech, Inc. Provides Update On Hospital Project, PCAOB Audit, and New Heat Shield™ Line August 24th, 2015

Graphene oxide's secret properties revealed at atomic level: A research team found that graphene oxide's inherent defects give rise to a surprising mechanical property August 24th, 2015

Grants/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

50 Years of Scanning Electron Microscopy from ZEISS: ZEISS celebrates the birth of the first commercial scanning electron microscope in 1965 August 26th, 2015

How UEA research could help build computers from DNA August 19th, 2015

'Quantum dot' technology may help light the future August 19th, 2015

Exercise-induced hormone irisin is not a 'myth' August 14th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic