Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > 'Computer Synapse' Analyzed at Nanoscale

Abstract:
Researchers said they have analyzed in unprecedented detail the physical and chemical properties of an electronic device that computer engineers hope will transform computing.

'Computer Synapse' Analyzed at Nanoscale

Tehran, Iran | Posted on May 17th, 2011

Memristors, short for memory resistors, are a newly understood circuit element for the development of electronics and have inspired experts to seek ways of mimicking the behavior of our own brains' activity inside a computer.

The research conducted at Hewlett Packard and the University of California, Santa Barbara, and published in IOP Publishing's Nanotechnology, explains how the researchers have used highly focused x-rays to map out the nanoscale physical and chemical properties of these electronic devices.

It is thought memristors, with the ability to 'remember' the total electronic charge that passes through them, will be of greatest benefit when they can act like synapses within electronic circuits, mimicking the complex network of neurons present in the brain, enabling our own ability to perceive, think and remember.

Mimicking biological synapses -- the junctions between two neurons where information is transmitted in our brains -- could lead to a wide range of novel applications, including semi-autonomous robots, if complex networks of neurons can be reproduced in an artificial system.

In order for the huge potential of memristors to be utilized, researchers first need to understand the physical processes that occur within the memristors at a very small scale.

Memristors have a very simple structure -- often just a thin film made of titanium dioxide between two metal electrodes -- and have been extensively studied in terms of their electrical properties.

For the first time, researchers have been able to non-destructively study the physical properties of memristors allowing for a more detailed insight into the chemistry and structure changes that occur when the device is operating.

The researchers were able to study the exact channel where the resistance switching of memristors occurs by using a combination of techniques.

They used highly focused x-rays to locate and image the approximately one hundred nanometer wide channel where the switching of resistance takes place, which could then be fed into a mathematical model of how the memristor heats up.

John Paul Strachan of the nanoElectronics Research Group, Hewlett-Packard Labs, California, said: "One of the biggest hurdles in using these devices is understanding how they work: the microscopic picture for how they undergo such tremendous and reversible change in resistance.

"We now have a direct picture for the thermal profile that is highly localized around this channel during electrical operation, and is likely to play a large role in accelerating the physics driving the memristive behavior."

This research appears as part of a special issue on non-volatile memory based on nanostructures.

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © Fars News Agency

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

'Lasers rewired': Scientists find a new way to make nanowire lasers: Berkeley Lab, UC Berkeley scientists adapt next-gen solar cell materials for a different purpose February 12th, 2016

Breaking cell barriers with retractable protein nanoneedles: Adapting a bacterial structure, Wyss Institute researchers develop protein actuators that can mechanically puncture cells February 12th, 2016

Replacement of Toxic Antibacterial Agents Possible by Biocompatible Polymeric Nanocomposites February 12th, 2016

Properties of Polymeric Nanofibers Optimized to Treat Damaged Body Tissues February 12th, 2016

Thin films

Research reveals carbon films can give microchips energy storage capability: International team from Drexel University and Paul Sabatier University reveals versatility of carbon films February 11th, 2016

New thin film transistor may lead to flexible devices: Researchers engineer an electronics first, opening door to flexible electronics February 10th, 2016

IBS report electric transport across molybdenum disulfide grain boundaries: Scientific team from CINAP/IBS identifies previously undiscovered differences in grain boundaries January 28th, 2016

Weaving a new story for COFS and MOFs: First materials to be woven at the atomic and molecular levels created at Berkeley January 24th, 2016

Teijin to Participate in Nano Tech 2016 January 21st, 2016

Brain-Computer Interfaces

Graphene shown to safely interact with neurons in the brain January 31st, 2016

Chip Technology

A metal that behaves like water: Researchers describe new behaviors of graphene February 12th, 2016

Silicon chip with integrated laser: Light from a nanowire: Nanolaser for information technology February 12th, 2016

Research reveals carbon films can give microchips energy storage capability: International team from Drexel University and Paul Sabatier University reveals versatility of carbon films February 11th, 2016

New thin film transistor may lead to flexible devices: Researchers engineer an electronics first, opening door to flexible electronics February 10th, 2016

Memory Technology

A step towards keeping up with Moore's Law: POSTECH researchers develop a novel and efficient fabrication technology for cross-shaped memristor January 30th, 2016

Scientists build a neural network using plastic memristors: A group of Russian and Italian scientists have created a neural network based on polymeric memristors -- devices that can potentially be used to build fundamentally new computers January 28th, 2016

LC.300 Series Nanopositioning Controller from nPoint January 28th, 2016

First all-antiferromagnetic memory device could get digital data storage in a spin January 16th, 2016

Discoveries

'Lasers rewired': Scientists find a new way to make nanowire lasers: Berkeley Lab, UC Berkeley scientists adapt next-gen solar cell materials for a different purpose February 12th, 2016

Breaking cell barriers with retractable protein nanoneedles: Adapting a bacterial structure, Wyss Institute researchers develop protein actuators that can mechanically puncture cells February 12th, 2016

Replacement of Toxic Antibacterial Agents Possible by Biocompatible Polymeric Nanocomposites February 12th, 2016

Properties of Polymeric Nanofibers Optimized to Treat Damaged Body Tissues February 12th, 2016

Announcements

Graphene leans on glass to advance electronics: Scientists' use of common glass to optimize graphene's electronic properties could improve technologies from flat screens to solar cells February 12th, 2016

Breaking cell barriers with retractable protein nanoneedles: Adapting a bacterial structure, Wyss Institute researchers develop protein actuators that can mechanically puncture cells February 12th, 2016

Replacement of Toxic Antibacterial Agents Possible by Biocompatible Polymeric Nanocomposites February 12th, 2016

Properties of Polymeric Nanofibers Optimized to Treat Damaged Body Tissues February 12th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE





  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic