Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors


Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Surgeons predict the future of nanomedicine in practice: Nanotechnology holds promise for developing surgical measures

Abstract:
A new review published in WIREs Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology explores how nanotechnology may provide powerful new tools that could have a marked impact on the therapeutic and diagnostic measures available to surgeons.

Surgeons predict the future of nanomedicine in practice: Nanotechnology holds promise for developing surgical measures

Posted on March 1st, 2011

Nanotechnology uses very small objects—billionths of a meter—to achieve tasks that would be difficult at larger scales. Nanodevices travel relatively freely throughout the body and can enter cells, making them useful for drug delivery, or mimic the features of the environment outside cells, making them useful for tissue engineering.

Their very properties can change as they become very small, allowing them to be triggered by external energy sources. Incorporation of nanoparticles into other materials can also change the latter's properties, making them stronger, or more flexible.

All of these properties can potentially be usefully harnessed by surgical practitioners to move their field forward. For example, review author Dr. Christopher Weldon MD, PhD of Children's Hospital Boston is developing everyday surgical implements enhanced by nanoscale features for improved performance and drug delivery. Review author Dr. Bozhi Tian, PhD, of Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is developing an approach for integrating nanoscale digital electronics with engineered tissues. The goal of that project is to combine prosthetic devices and conventional engineered tissues at the cellular level, so that parallel diagnostics and tissue repair can be achieved. He is also working on designing a 3D tissue scaffold with nanoscale surface patterns and electronically active nanoscale elements for stem cell differentiation. Review author Dr. Daniel S. Kohane, MD, PhD, of Children's Hospital Boston is developing a wide range of nanotechnology-based drug delivery devices that could be triggered by a patient or physician on demand.

Dr. Kohane notes that "Surgeons are effective gatekeepers in controlling access of technology to their patients. It is therefore important for surgeons to know what nanotechnology is and is not. The ability to assess the merits of nano-based approaches is crucial for the protection of the best interests of patients and for the assessment of the cost-effectiveness of new therapies."

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Amy Molnar

Copyright © Wiley-Blackwell

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Non-animal approach to predict impact of nanomaterials on human lung published Archives of Toxicology publishes workshop recommendations May 2nd, 2016

Making invisible physics visible: The Jayich Lab has created a new sensor technology that captures nanoscale images with high spatial resolution and sensitivity May 2nd, 2016

New drug-delivery approach holds potential for treating obesity May 2nd, 2016

Spintronics for future information technologies: Spin currents in topological insulators controlled May 2nd, 2016

Nanomedicine

Non-animal approach to predict impact of nanomaterials on human lung published Archives of Toxicology publishes workshop recommendations May 2nd, 2016

New drug-delivery approach holds potential for treating obesity May 2nd, 2016

Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering May 1st, 2016

The Translational Research Center at the University Hospital of Erlangen in Germany uses the ZetaView from Particle Metrix to quantify extracellular vesicles such as exosomes April 28th, 2016

Announcements

Non-animal approach to predict impact of nanomaterials on human lung published Archives of Toxicology publishes workshop recommendations May 2nd, 2016

Making invisible physics visible: The Jayich Lab has created a new sensor technology that captures nanoscale images with high spatial resolution and sensitivity May 2nd, 2016

New drug-delivery approach holds potential for treating obesity May 2nd, 2016

Spintronics for future information technologies: Spin currents in topological insulators controlled May 2nd, 2016

Interviews/Book Reviews/Essays/Reports/Podcasts/Journals/White papers

Non-animal approach to predict impact of nanomaterials on human lung published Archives of Toxicology publishes workshop recommendations May 2nd, 2016

Making invisible physics visible: The Jayich Lab has created a new sensor technology that captures nanoscale images with high spatial resolution and sensitivity May 2nd, 2016

New drug-delivery approach holds potential for treating obesity May 2nd, 2016

Spintronics for future information technologies: Spin currents in topological insulators controlled May 2nd, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic