Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Chemist's Work Brings More National Recognition as Promising Early - Career Scientist

Christine Aikens
Christine Aikens

Abstract:
A Kansas State University chemistry professor has been selected as a Sloan Research Fellow for her success as a promising young scholar, particularly in the research areas of sustainable energy and gold nanoparticles.

Chemist's Work Brings More National Recognition as Promising Early - Career Scientist

Manhattan, KS | Posted on February 28th, 2011

Christine Aikens, assistant professor of chemistry, has received the two-year $50,000 award, which the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation gives annually to early-career scientists and scholars as a way to recognize their achievements and potential to contribute to their field.

"It's an honor to be part of that group," Aikens said. "So many previous awardees are recognized now as being at the top of the field. This award will give our research group the flexibility to study some intriguing problems that are not funded by other sources."

This year, 118 researchers from 54 colleges and universities in the United States and Canada received the Sloan Research Fellowship. Only 23 of the 118 awards were given to chemists.

"This is an extraordinarily competitive program and it marks Christine as being among the very brightest stars of her scientific generation," said Eric Maatta, head of the department of chemistry who nominated Aikens for the award.

The fellowship is the second major research award that Aikens has recently earned. Last year she received a five-year, $600,000 NSF CAREER award to support her research that looks at how plants and inorganic systems can use light to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. The research can lead to clean, renewable sources of energy.

"We are proud of Dr. Aikens' accomplishments and the recognition she has received for her research," said Kirk Schulz, K-State president. "With creative and forward-thinking researchers such as Dr. Aikens, K-State is well on its way to becoming a top 50 public research university by 2025."

Aikens plans to use the Sloan Research Fellowship for computer resources and professional travel.

She has a broad range of research interests and the award will support some of her supplemental research involving gold nanoparticles. The U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research has been supporting her gold nanoparticle research for several years, but the Sloan Research Fellowship will allow her to explore more fundamental topics, such as nanoparticle growth mechanisms.

"The systems we're looking at have a lot of applications," Aikens said. "We're doing fundamental research to try and understand why they are so useful."

Aikens is particularly interested in the optical properties of nanoparticles and how they can be used in cancer research. Nanoparticles are very tunable, and they can be altered to a particular wavelength so they absorb radiation. As a result, the nanoparticles can be used to develop more effective cancer treatment that focuses on cancerous tissue and does not damage good tissue.

"It's these kinds of applications that have really driven our research," Aikens said. "We're really a fundamental group trying to understand the reasons for why it would do this. After you understand something, you can apply it to different situations and know what you're doing. You can control it."

Two other researchers in the K-State's department of chemistry have previously received the Sloan Research Fellowship: Duy Hua, university distinguished professor of chemistry, and Mark Hollingsworth, associate professor of chemistry.

Aikens joined K-State in 2007 after serving a postdoctoral research fellowship at Northwestern University. She earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Oklahoma in 2000 and a doctorate from Iowa State University in 2005.

####

About Kansas State University
Kansas State University ranks as one of the nation’s “cutting-edge schools,” according to a guidebook that pinpoints today’s hottest majors and the innovative colleges that offer them. K-State was the only school in the Big 12 to make the cut in Kaplan Publishing’s You Are Here: A Guide to Over 380 Colleges and Unlimited Paths to Your Future.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Christine Aikens
785-532-0954


News release prepared by:
Jennifer Torline
785-532-0847

Copyright © Kansas State University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Academic/Education

Sustainable nanotechnology center September 1st, 2015

National Science Foundation Selects SUNY Poly CNSE for Expanded $2.1M Northeast Advanced Technological Education Center: NSF Center Locates to NanoCollege in Support of Flourishing Tech Industry in NYS September 1st, 2015

Announcing Oxford Instruments and School of Physics signing a Memorandum of Understanding August 26th, 2015

Kwansei Gakuin University in Hyogo, Japan, uses Raman microscopy to study crystallographic defects in silicon carbide wafers August 25th, 2015

Announcements

New nanomaterial maintains conductivity in three dimensions: International team seamlessly bonds CNTs and graphene September 5th, 2015

Multi-million pound project to use nanotechnology to improve safety September 4th, 2015

Magnetic wormhole connecting 2 regions of space created for the first time: The device could have applications in medicine, opening up ways to make MRIs more comfortable for patients September 4th, 2015

Making fuel from light: Argonne research sheds light on photosynthesis and creation of solar fuel September 3rd, 2015

Energy

New nanomaterial maintains conductivity in three dimensions: International team seamlessly bonds CNTs and graphene September 5th, 2015

Making fuel from light: Argonne research sheds light on photosynthesis and creation of solar fuel September 3rd, 2015

For 2-D boron, it's all about that base: Rice University theorists show flat boron form would depend on metal substrates September 2nd, 2015

Phagraphene, a 'relative' of graphene, discovered September 2nd, 2015

Grants/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Multi-million pound project to use nanotechnology to improve safety September 4th, 2015

Making nanowires from protein and DNA September 3rd, 2015

Reversible Writing with Light: Self-assembling nanoparticles take their cues from their surroundings September 3rd, 2015

A marine creature's magic trick explained: Crystal structures on the sea sapphire's back appear differently depending on the angle of reflection September 2nd, 2015

New-Contracts/Sales/Customers

Tongfang Global and QD Vision Partner to Bring Wide Color Gamut to Global Television Lines: Color IQTM quantum dots help boost company’s focus on superior color reproduction September 3rd, 2015

Nanolab Technologies LEAPS Forward with High-Performance Analysis Services to the World: Nanolab Orders Advanced Local Electrode Atom Probe (LEAP®) Microscope from CAMECA Unit of AMETEK Materials Analysis Division August 27th, 2015

Conformal transfer of graphene for reproducible device fabrication August 11th, 2015

Liquipel Debuts Eyesight-Saving ION-Glass Blue Light Protection for iPhones and Androids at RadioShack Stores Nationwide: Liquipel's Unique Protective Screen, Available at RadioShack, Cuts Harmful Blue Light Implicated in Macular Degeneration by 10x July 28th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic