Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors


Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Butterfly wings behind anti-counterfeiting nanotechnology

N.O.t.E.S - Nano-Optic Technology for Enhanced Security. The red/green shifting maple leaf on the note is a thin film fabricated with nano-scale optics to produce a vivid overt colour shift for simple and immediate authentication.  Courtesy Nanotech Security Corp.
N.O.t.E.S - Nano-Optic Technology for Enhanced Security. The red/green shifting maple leaf on the note is a thin film fabricated with nano-scale optics to produce a vivid overt colour shift for simple and immediate authentication. Courtesy Nanotech Security Corp.

Abstract:
Imagine a hole so small that air can't go through it, or a hole so small it can trap a single wavelength of light. Nanotech Security Corp., with the help of Simon Fraser University researchers, is using this type of nano-technology - 1,500 times thinner than a human hair and first of its kind in the world - to create unique anti-counterfeiting security features.

Butterfly wings behind anti-counterfeiting nanotechnology

Burnaby, B.C. | Posted on January 18th, 2011

The technology is first being applied to banknotes but it also has many more practical applications, such as authenticating legal documents, retail merchandise, concert tickets, stock certificates, visas, passports, and pharmaceuticals.

SFU applied sciences grad Clint Landrock started the initial research into nanoholes under the guidance of SFU engineering science professor Bozena Kaminska. When the pair pitched their idea to Doug Blakeway, SFU Venture Connection's entrepreneur in residence and also CEO and chairman of Nanotech, he was immediately intrigued by the technology's potential.

"I love nanotechnology but I really have not seen a commercialization of it that can make you money in the near term," said Blakeway. "When this was initially presented to me by Bozena and Clint, I immediately saw their vision and they were only after one application - creating anti-counterfeiting features for banknotes. I felt this could be the first commercial application of nanotechnology in the world. I kept thinking of applications for it and how it could be used; the technologies and potential astound me."

Landrock and Kaminska both continue their work as part of Nanotech's scientific team. The company's Nano-Optic Technology for Enhanced Security (NOtES) product stems from an idea originating in the purest form of nature - insects using colorful markings to identify themselves.

How this works is microscopic gratings composed of nanostructures interact with light to produce the shimmering iridescence seen on the Costa Rican morpho butterfly. The nanostructures act to reflect and refract light waves to produce the morpho's signature blue wings and absorb other unwanted light.

The highly advanced wing structures are the result of many millennia of evolution, and only recently have Nanotech's scientists discovered how to reproduce these structures reliably. While others have talked about the possibility of re-creating it, Nanotech has made this a reality.

The U.S. Treasury, which produces up to 11 billion banknotes annually, is a potential customer for Nanotech's product. The new U.S. $100 bill, designed with state-of-the art security features, was supposed to be introduced in February 2011 but it's been delayed due to some manufacturing issues.

Banknotes contain several security features - some that you can plainly see and some that only machines can read - such as hologram strips, security threads woven into the paper, watermarks, color-shifting inks, raised type, and UV inks.

According to Blakeway, Nanotech's product - which has attracted the attention of treasuries internationally - is superior to holograms and can't be duplicated.

"Nobody has ever done this," he said. "We have succeeded while everybody is still trying to duplicate or imitate a butterfly's wing because it absorbs light and gives off the color. There's no color pigment - there's nothing like a dye or anything else. It's a hole that traps light and releases color.

"You can't copy or scan it in, you can't inkjet it on paper, you can't do any of these things. It's extremely sophisticated and expensive to make the shims and dyes to produce, but very inexpensive to produce it at the end. Anywhere you can think of where a hologram is being used today, our technology can replace it. It's more secure than a hologram. You can't lift it off - we can put it onto metal, plastic, or paper."

SFU Venture Connections offers training and support programs for SFU entrepreneurs. It links students, faculty and local entrepreneurs with experienced advisors and funding opportunities.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Doug Blakeway
Nanotech Security Corp.
604.551.6791


Bozena Kaminska
Nanotech Security Corp.
604.506.1214


Clint Landrock
Nanotech Security Corp.
778.881.3210


Dixon Tam
SFU media relations
778.782.8742

Copyright © Simon Fraser University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Yale researchers’ technology turns wasted heat into power June 27th, 2016

FEI Launches Helios G4 DualBeam Series for Materials Science: The Helios G4 DualBeam Series features new capabilities to enable scientists and engineers to answer the most demanding and challenging scientific questions June 27th, 2016

Russian physicists create a high-precision 'quantum ruler': Physicists have devised a method for creating a special quantum entangled state June 25th, 2016

Nanoscientists develop the 'ultimate discovery tool': Rapid discovery power is similar to what gene chips offer biology June 25th, 2016

Law enforcement/Anti-Counterfeiting/Security/Loss prevention

New approach to microlasers: Technique for 'phase locking' arrays of tiny lasers could lead to terahertz security scanners June 17th, 2016

Leti Innovation Day in Lyon Will Explore New Security Challenges and Responses for a Safe Connected World June 15th, 2016

A better hologram for fraud protection and wearable optics: Nanotechnology improves holographic capabilities by encoding light polarization May 16th, 2016

Russian scientists develop long-range secure quantum communication system April 13th, 2016

Possible Futures

Yale researchers’ technology turns wasted heat into power June 27th, 2016

Superheroes are real: Ultrasensitive nonlinear metamaterials for data transfer June 25th, 2016

Russian physicists create a high-precision 'quantum ruler': Physicists have devised a method for creating a special quantum entangled state June 25th, 2016

Nanoscientists develop the 'ultimate discovery tool': Rapid discovery power is similar to what gene chips offer biology June 25th, 2016

Academic/Education

JPK’s NanoWizard® AFM and ForceRobot® systems are being used in the field of medical diagnostics in the Supersensitive Molecular Layer Laboratory of POSTECH in Korea June 21st, 2016

Weizmann Institute of Science Presents: Weizmann Wonder Wander - 4G - is Online June 21st, 2016

NanoLabNL boosts quality of research facilities as Dutch Toekomstfonds invests firmly June 10th, 2016

The Institute for Transfusion Medicine at the University Hospital of Duisburg-Essen in Germany uses the ZetaView from Particle Metrix to quantify extracellular vesicles June 7th, 2016

Announcements

Yale researchers’ technology turns wasted heat into power June 27th, 2016

FEI Launches Helios G4 DualBeam Series for Materials Science: The Helios G4 DualBeam Series features new capabilities to enable scientists and engineers to answer the most demanding and challenging scientific questions June 27th, 2016

Russian physicists create a high-precision 'quantum ruler': Physicists have devised a method for creating a special quantum entangled state June 25th, 2016

Nanoscientists develop the 'ultimate discovery tool': Rapid discovery power is similar to what gene chips offer biology June 25th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic