Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Butterfly wings behind anti-counterfeiting nanotechnology

N.O.t.E.S - Nano-Optic Technology for Enhanced Security. The red/green shifting maple leaf on the note is a thin film fabricated with nano-scale optics to produce a vivid overt colour shift for simple and immediate authentication.  Courtesy Nanotech Security Corp.
N.O.t.E.S - Nano-Optic Technology for Enhanced Security. The red/green shifting maple leaf on the note is a thin film fabricated with nano-scale optics to produce a vivid overt colour shift for simple and immediate authentication. Courtesy Nanotech Security Corp.

Abstract:
Imagine a hole so small that air can't go through it, or a hole so small it can trap a single wavelength of light. Nanotech Security Corp., with the help of Simon Fraser University researchers, is using this type of nano-technology - 1,500 times thinner than a human hair and first of its kind in the world - to create unique anti-counterfeiting security features.

Butterfly wings behind anti-counterfeiting nanotechnology

Burnaby, B.C. | Posted on January 18th, 2011

The technology is first being applied to banknotes but it also has many more practical applications, such as authenticating legal documents, retail merchandise, concert tickets, stock certificates, visas, passports, and pharmaceuticals.

SFU applied sciences grad Clint Landrock started the initial research into nanoholes under the guidance of SFU engineering science professor Bozena Kaminska. When the pair pitched their idea to Doug Blakeway, SFU Venture Connection's entrepreneur in residence and also CEO and chairman of Nanotech, he was immediately intrigued by the technology's potential.

"I love nanotechnology but I really have not seen a commercialization of it that can make you money in the near term," said Blakeway. "When this was initially presented to me by Bozena and Clint, I immediately saw their vision and they were only after one application - creating anti-counterfeiting features for banknotes. I felt this could be the first commercial application of nanotechnology in the world. I kept thinking of applications for it and how it could be used; the technologies and potential astound me."

Landrock and Kaminska both continue their work as part of Nanotech's scientific team. The company's Nano-Optic Technology for Enhanced Security (NOtES) product stems from an idea originating in the purest form of nature - insects using colorful markings to identify themselves.

How this works is microscopic gratings composed of nanostructures interact with light to produce the shimmering iridescence seen on the Costa Rican morpho butterfly. The nanostructures act to reflect and refract light waves to produce the morpho's signature blue wings and absorb other unwanted light.

The highly advanced wing structures are the result of many millennia of evolution, and only recently have Nanotech's scientists discovered how to reproduce these structures reliably. While others have talked about the possibility of re-creating it, Nanotech has made this a reality.

The U.S. Treasury, which produces up to 11 billion banknotes annually, is a potential customer for Nanotech's product. The new U.S. $100 bill, designed with state-of-the art security features, was supposed to be introduced in February 2011 but it's been delayed due to some manufacturing issues.

Banknotes contain several security features - some that you can plainly see and some that only machines can read - such as hologram strips, security threads woven into the paper, watermarks, color-shifting inks, raised type, and UV inks.

According to Blakeway, Nanotech's product - which has attracted the attention of treasuries internationally - is superior to holograms and can't be duplicated.

"Nobody has ever done this," he said. "We have succeeded while everybody is still trying to duplicate or imitate a butterfly's wing because it absorbs light and gives off the color. There's no color pigment - there's nothing like a dye or anything else. It's a hole that traps light and releases color.

"You can't copy or scan it in, you can't inkjet it on paper, you can't do any of these things. It's extremely sophisticated and expensive to make the shims and dyes to produce, but very inexpensive to produce it at the end. Anywhere you can think of where a hologram is being used today, our technology can replace it. It's more secure than a hologram. You can't lift it off - we can put it onto metal, plastic, or paper."

SFU Venture Connections offers training and support programs for SFU entrepreneurs. It links students, faculty and local entrepreneurs with experienced advisors and funding opportunities.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Doug Blakeway
Nanotech Security Corp.
604.551.6791


Bozena Kaminska
Nanotech Security Corp.
604.506.1214


Clint Landrock
Nanotech Security Corp.
778.881.3210


Dixon Tam
SFU media relations
778.782.8742

Copyright © Simon Fraser University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Bosch announces high-performance MEMS acceleration sensors for wearables June 27th, 2017

Nanometrics to Participate in the 9th Annual CEO Investor Summit 2017: Accredited investor and publishing research analyst event held concurrently with SEMICON West and Intersolar 2017 in San Francisco June 27th, 2017

NMRC, University of Nottingham chooses the Quorum Q150 coater for its reliable and reproducible film thickness when coating samples with iridium June 27th, 2017

Picosunís ALD solutions enable novel high-speed memories June 27th, 2017

Law enforcement/Anti-Counterfeiting/Security/Loss prevention

Leti Announces Backside Shield that Protects Microchips from Physical Attacks March 8th, 2017

NUS engineers develop low-cost, flexible terahertz radiation source for fast, non-invasive screening: Novel invention presents promising applications in spectroscopy, safety surveillance, cancer diagnosis, imaging and communication February 1st, 2017

Strength of hair inspires new materials for body armor January 18th, 2017

Dressing a metal in various colors: DGIST research developed a technology to coat metal with several nanometers of semiconducting materials January 17th, 2017

Possible Futures

Physicists make quantum leap in understanding life's nanoscale machinery June 27th, 2017

Atomic imperfections move quantum communication network closer to reality June 25th, 2017

Research accelerates quest for quicker, longer-lasting electronics: UC Riverside-led research makes topological insulators magnetic well above room temperatures June 25th, 2017

U.S. Air Force Research Lab Taps IBM to Build Brain-Inspired AI Supercomputing System: Equal to 64 million neurons, new neurosynaptic supercomputing system will power complex AI tasks at unprecedented speed and energy efficiency June 23rd, 2017

Academic/Education

Oxford Instruments congratulates Lancaster University for inaugurating the IsoLab, built for studying quantum systems June 20th, 2017

The 2017 Winners for Generation Nano June 8th, 2017

MIT Energy Initiative awards 10 seed fund grants for early-stage energy research May 4th, 2017

Bar-Ilan University to set up quantum research center May 1st, 2017

Announcements

Bosch announces high-performance MEMS acceleration sensors for wearables June 27th, 2017

Nanometrics to Participate in the 9th Annual CEO Investor Summit 2017: Accredited investor and publishing research analyst event held concurrently with SEMICON West and Intersolar 2017 in San Francisco June 27th, 2017

NMRC, University of Nottingham chooses the Quorum Q150 coater for its reliable and reproducible film thickness when coating samples with iridium June 27th, 2017

Picosunís ALD solutions enable novel high-speed memories June 27th, 2017

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project