Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Clarkson University Professor Synthesizes Brightest Fluorescent Nanoparticles Applications in material science, medicine and biology

Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image of an ultrabright fluorescent mesoporous silica nanoparticle (image colored artificially to match the actual color of the dye in the particles).
Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image of an ultrabright fluorescent mesoporous silica nanoparticle (image colored artificially to match the actual color of the dye in the particles).

Abstract:
Clarkson University Physics Professor Igor Sokolov and his team have discovered a method of making the brightest ever synthesized fluorescent silica nanoparticles.

Clarkson University Professor Synthesizes Brightest Fluorescent Nanoparticles Applications in material science, medicine and biology

Potsdam, NY | Posted on January 17th, 2011

The scientists reported on the first successful approach to synthesizing ultrabright fluorescent mesoporous silica nanoparticles this fall in the leading interdisciplinary scientific journal Small.

You can see the full article at onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/smll.201001337/abstract

These nanoparticles have potential applications in medicine, biology, material science, and environmental protection, among many other uses.

Fluorescent materials are already used in many of these applications. However, having much brighter labeling particles will allow much finer detection of environmental pollutants, signals in biosensors and even the detection of explosives.

In fluorescence, an initial ignition light energizes molecules, and then the molecules reemit the light with a different color. This phenomenon can be used in many different applications because it is easily detectable, using optical filters to remove the ignition light, leaving only the particles' light visible.

"The particles should have a significant impact in the biomedical area," says Sokolov. "For example, you can create particles of different colors, which can be made to stick to particular biological molecules inside cells. Then you can see and trace those molecules easily with existing fluorescent microscopes. This fluorescent labeling helps to identify diseased cells and may show what is causing the disease. The particles are much more stable against photo-beaching than typical fluorescent dye. This means that one can trace the particles for a very long time."

Sokolov's process physically entraps a large number of organic fluorescent molecules inside nanoporous silica particles, which can be 20 to 50 nanometers in diameter, while preventing the molecules from leaking.

As an example of their brightness, the fluorescence of 40-nanometer particles is 34 times brighter than the brightest water-dispersible (25-30 nanometer) quantum dots and seem to be the brightest nanoparticles created so far.

In 2007, Sokolov and his team discovered a method of making the brightest ever synthesized fluorescent silica micro (non-nano) particles. Various attempts to decrease the size of the particles down to the nanoscale led to the particles that were bright but not ultrabright. The problem was in the dye leakage. It took the group several years to finally synthesize the ultrabright nanoparticles.

Sokolov and postdoctoral fellow Eun-Bum Cho (now an assistant professor at Seoul National University of Science and Technology) and Ph.D. student Dmytro Volkov developed the process, which gives the desired nanoparticles. The group, which now includes postdoctoral fellow Shajesh Palantavida, is currently looking at the development of the particles suitable for biomedical labeling.

The research was partially supported by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory's Army Research Office. It was performed in Clarkson's Nanoengineering and Biotechnology Laboratories Center (NABLAB), a unit led by Sokolov and established to promote cross-disciplinary collaborations within the University.

NABLAB comprises more than a dozen faculty members who apply the expertise of Clarkson scholars to cancer cell research, fine particles for bio and medical applications, synthesis of smart materials, advancement biosensors, and more.

####

About Clarkson University
Clarkson University launches leaders into the global economy. One in six alumni already leads as a CEO, VP or equivalent senior executive of a company. Located just outside the Adirondack Park in Potsdam, N.Y., Clarkson is a nationally recognized research university for undergraduates with select graduate programs in signature areas of academic excellence directed toward the world's pressing issues. Through 50 rigorous programs of study in engineering, business, arts, sciences and health sciences, the entire learning-living community spans boundaries across disciplines, nations and cultures to build powers of observation, challenge the status quo, and connect discovery and engineering innovation with enterprise.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Michael P. Griffin
Director of News & Digital Content Services
15-268-6716

Copyright © Clarkson University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Electric-car battery materials could harm key soil bacteria February 11th, 2016

Creating a color printer that uses a colorless, non-toxic ink inspired by nature February 11th, 2016

SLAC X-ray laser turns crystal imperfections into better images of important biomolecules: New method could remove major obstacles to studying structures of complex biological machines February 11th, 2016

Nanoparticle reduces targeted cancer drug's toxicity February 11th, 2016

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Electric-car battery materials could harm key soil bacteria February 11th, 2016

Creating a color printer that uses a colorless, non-toxic ink inspired by nature February 11th, 2016

SLAC X-ray laser turns crystal imperfections into better images of important biomolecules: New method could remove major obstacles to studying structures of complex biological machines February 11th, 2016

Scientists take nanoparticle snapshots February 10th, 2016

Possible Futures

Chemical cages: New technique advances synthetic biology February 10th, 2016

New thin film transistor may lead to flexible devices: Researchers engineer an electronics first, opening door to flexible electronics February 10th, 2016

Electron's 1-D metallic surface state observed: A step for the prediction of electronic properties of extremely-fine metal nanowires in next-generation semiconductors February 9th, 2016

A fast solidification process makes material crackle February 8th, 2016

Academic/Education

SUNY Poly and GLOBALFOUNDRIES Announce New $500M R&D Program in Albany To Accelerate Next Generation Chip Technology: Arrival of Second Cutting Edge EUV Lithography Tool Launches New Patterning Center That Will Generate Over 100 New High Tech Jobs at SUNY Poly February 9th, 2016

COD Grad Begins Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University: Marsela Jorgolli's Passion for Physics Has Led to a Decade of Academic Research That Continues at Harvard University as a Postdoctoral Fellow February 2nd, 2016

Heriot-Watt's Institute of Photonics & Quantum Sciences uses the Deben Microtest 2 kN tensile stage to characterise ceramics and engineering plastics January 21st, 2016

Multiple uses for the JPK NanoWizard AFM system in the Smart Interfaces in Environmental Nanotechnology Group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign January 20th, 2016

Nanomedicine

Canadian Scientists Develop Innovative Protein Test for Zika February 11th, 2016

SLAC X-ray laser turns crystal imperfections into better images of important biomolecules: New method could remove major obstacles to studying structures of complex biological machines February 11th, 2016

Nanoparticle reduces targeted cancer drug's toxicity February 11th, 2016

Nanoparticle therapy that uses LDL and fish oil kills liver cancer cells February 9th, 2016

Discoveries

Research reveals carbon films can give microchips energy storage capability: International team from Drexel University and Paul Sabatier University reveals versatility of carbon films February 11th, 2016

Canadian Scientists Develop Innovative Protein Test for Zika February 11th, 2016

Creating a color printer that uses a colorless, non-toxic ink inspired by nature February 11th, 2016

SLAC X-ray laser turns crystal imperfections into better images of important biomolecules: New method could remove major obstacles to studying structures of complex biological machines February 11th, 2016

Materials/Metamaterials

SLAC X-ray laser turns crystal imperfections into better images of important biomolecules: New method could remove major obstacles to studying structures of complex biological machines February 11th, 2016

Chemical cages: New technique advances synthetic biology February 10th, 2016

Superconductivity: Footballs with no resistance - Indications of light-induced lossless electricity transmission in fullerenes contribute to the search for superconducting materials for practical applications February 9th, 2016

Making sense of metallic glass February 9th, 2016

Announcements

Research reveals carbon films can give microchips energy storage capability: International team from Drexel University and Paul Sabatier University reveals versatility of carbon films February 11th, 2016

Creating a color printer that uses a colorless, non-toxic ink inspired by nature February 11th, 2016

SLAC X-ray laser turns crystal imperfections into better images of important biomolecules: New method could remove major obstacles to studying structures of complex biological machines February 11th, 2016

Nanoparticle reduces targeted cancer drug's toxicity February 11th, 2016

Environment

Electric-car battery materials could harm key soil bacteria February 11th, 2016

Creating a color printer that uses a colorless, non-toxic ink inspired by nature February 11th, 2016

Scientists have put a high precision blood assay into a simple test strip: Researchers have developed a new biosensor test system based on magnetic nanoparticles February 3rd, 2016

Herbal Extracts Applied to Synthesize Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles January 28th, 2016

Quantum Dots/Rods

Nanoscale cavity strongly links quantum particles: Single photons can quickly modify individual electrons embedded in a semiconductor chip and vice versa February 8th, 2016

The iron stepping stones to better wearable tech without semiconductors February 8th, 2016

QD Vision Named to the 2015 Global Cleantech 100 Under the Radar List: Quantum Dot Leader Recognized for Clean Technology Innovation January 26th, 2016

Light-activated nanoparticles prove effective against antibiotic-resistant 'superbugs' January 19th, 2016

Nanobiotechnology

Canadian Scientists Develop Innovative Protein Test for Zika February 11th, 2016

SLAC X-ray laser turns crystal imperfections into better images of important biomolecules: New method could remove major obstacles to studying structures of complex biological machines February 11th, 2016

Nanoparticle reduces targeted cancer drug's toxicity February 11th, 2016

Chemical cages: New technique advances synthetic biology February 10th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic