Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Ultrafast imaging of electron waves in graphene

(l to r) Young Il Joe, Peter Abbamonte, Eduardo Fradkin, Yu Gan; (seated) Bruno Uchoa. Photo by Hsin-Mao Wu
(l to r) Young Il Joe, Peter Abbamonte, Eduardo Fradkin, Yu Gan; (seated) Bruno Uchoa. Photo by Hsin-Mao Wu

Abstract:
Using advanced x-ray scattering techniques, physicists in Peter Abbamonte's group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have imaged the motion of electrons in graphene with resolutions of 0.533 Ň and 10.3 attoseconds.

Ultrafast imaging of electron waves in graphene

Urbana, IL | Posted on December 8th, 2010

The fastest movies ever made of electron motion, created by scattering x-rays off of graphene, have shown that the interaction among its electrons is surprisingly weak.

Graphene is a single atomic layer of carbon whose unusual electronic structure makes it a candidate for a new generation of low-cost, flexible electronics. A major outstanding question is whether the electrons in graphene move independently, or if their motion is correlated by Coulomb repulsion.

Using advanced x-ray scattering techniques, physicists in Peter Abbamonte's group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have imaged the motion of electrons in graphene with resolutions of 0.533 Ň and 10.3 attoseconds. Their results were published on November 5 in Science.

Exactly how small and how fast are these measurements? An angstrom is 1/10,000,000,000 of a meter, about the width of a hydrogen atom. And an attosecond is to a second as a second is to the age of the universe.

The researchers found that graphene screens Coulomb interactions surprisingly effectively, causing it to act like a simple, independent-electron semimetal. Their work explains several mysteries, including why freestanding graphene fails to become an insulator as predicted. The study also demonstrates a new approach to studying ultrafast dynamics, creating a new window on the most fundamental properties of materials.

The experiments were carried out at the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois and the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory.

This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under grants DE-FG02-07ER46459 and DE-FG02-07ER46453 through the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, with use of the Advanced Photon Source supported by DEAC02- 06CH11357. The conclusions presented are those of the researchers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Department of Energy.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Celia M. Elliott
217.244.7725

Copyright © University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Physicists gain new insights into nanosystems with spherical confinement: Enormous potential for the targeted delivery of pharmaceutical agents and the creation of tailored nanoparticles July 27th, 2017

Strange electrons break the crystal symmetry of high-temperature superconductors: Brookhaven Lab scientists discover spontaneous voltage perpendicular to applied current that may help unravel the mystery of high-temperature superconductors July 27th, 2017

Getting closer to porous, light-responsive materials: A new flexible material changes its porous nature when exposed to light July 27th, 2017

First Capacitive Transducer with 13nm Gap July 27th, 2017

Videos/Movies

Nanotech Advances Future Mobile Devices and Wearable Technology July 5th, 2017

ANU invention may help to protect astronauts from radiation in space July 3rd, 2017

Tiny bubbles provide tremendous propulsion in new microparticles research-Ben-Gurion U. June 21st, 2017

Graphene and quantum dots put in motion a CMOS-integrated camera that can see the invisible May 29th, 2017

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Strange electrons break the crystal symmetry of high-temperature superconductors: Brookhaven Lab scientists discover spontaneous voltage perpendicular to applied current that may help unravel the mystery of high-temperature superconductors July 27th, 2017

Graduate Students from Across the Country Attend Hands-on NanoCamp: Prominent scientists Warren Oliver, Ph.D., and George Pharr, Ph.D., presented a weeklong NanoCamp for hand-picked graduate students across the United States July 26th, 2017

Ultrathin device harvests electricity from human motion July 23rd, 2017

Semiliquid chains pulled out of a sea of microparticles July 20th, 2017

Academic/Education

Graduate Students from Across the Country Attend Hands-on NanoCamp: Prominent scientists Warren Oliver, Ph.D., and George Pharr, Ph.D., presented a weeklong NanoCamp for hand-picked graduate students across the United States July 26th, 2017

The Physics Department of Imperial College, London, uses the Quorum Q150T to deposit metals and ITO to make plasmonic sensors and electric contact pads July 13th, 2017

Oxford Instruments congratulates Lancaster University for inaugurating the IsoLab, built for studying quantum systems June 20th, 2017

The 2017 Winners for Generation Nano June 8th, 2017

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes/Nanorods

Regulation of two-dimensional nanomaterials: New driving force for lithium-ion batteries July 26th, 2017

Killing cancer in the heat of the moment: A new method efficiently transfers genes into cells, then activates them with light. This could lead to gene therapies for cancers July 9th, 2017

Tests show no nanotubes released during utilisation of nanoaugmented materials June 9th, 2017

Ag/ZnO-Nanorods Schottky diodes based UV-PDs are fabricated and tested May 26th, 2017

Announcements

Physicists gain new insights into nanosystems with spherical confinement: Enormous potential for the targeted delivery of pharmaceutical agents and the creation of tailored nanoparticles July 27th, 2017

Strange electrons break the crystal symmetry of high-temperature superconductors: Brookhaven Lab scientists discover spontaneous voltage perpendicular to applied current that may help unravel the mystery of high-temperature superconductors July 27th, 2017

Getting closer to porous, light-responsive materials: A new flexible material changes its porous nature when exposed to light July 27th, 2017

First Capacitive Transducer with 13nm Gap July 27th, 2017

Tools

Phenom-World Launches Phenom Pro and ProX Generation 5 SEMs at Microscopy & Microanalysis Conference USA: The excellent performance in a wide range of applications offers a serious alternative to floor model SEMs July 26th, 2017

The School of Materials at the University of Manchester utilise Debenís mechanical stages to characterise structure and behaviour at the micro- and nano- scale July 25th, 2017

Scientists announce the quest for high-index materials: All-dielectric nanophotonics: The quest for better materials and fabrication techniques July 22nd, 2017

Coupling a nano-trumpet with a quantum dot enables precise position determination July 14th, 2017

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project