Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors


Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Surfaces and Interfaces

Abstract:
Innovative techniques allow researchers to study interfaces with great precision. The methods could become powerful tools in the rational design of catalytic materials

Surfaces and Interfaces

Weinheim, Germany | Posted on November 25th, 2010

Equipment built by German scientists can be used to study processes at interfaces with great accuracy. In an article published recently in ChemPhysChem, Hans Joachim Freund and co-workers of the Fritz-Haber-Institut in Berlin describe the advancement of four experimental techniques developed in their lab to investigate nanoscopic systems. By combining photon scanning tunneling microscopy, aberration-corrected low-energy electron microscopy coupled to photoelectron emission microscopy, microcalorimetry, and electron-spin resonance spectroscopy, unique information on the relationship between geometric structure and properties is obtained. The methods can be applied to solve fundamental problems in surface science and to study interesting systems -particularly in the field of catalysis- which would otherwise be difficult (or impossible) to address.

"Catalysis happens at interfaces and experimental techniques are desperately needed to provide information on those systems", says Freund who is interested in understanding disperse metal and oxide catalysts at the atomic scale. According to the researcher, appropriate samples in this field are very complex so that a combination of techniques is generally required to achieve a complete picture and avoid overestimating individual results. This led him and his colleagues to design new instruments to characterize their systems.

The first method developed by the German team could overcome one of the main disadvantages of scanning probe techniques, namely, their inherent chemical insensitivity, by detecting the fluorescence signal generated by locally exciting the surface with electrons from the tip. The new technique is called photon scanning tunneling microscopy (PSTM) and has been used to study the optical characteristics of metal particles and investigate defect structures in oxide surfaces. Additionally, the researchers are working on a new aberration-corrected instrument for low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) and photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), which will hopefully allow them to investigate single supported nanocatalysts. Freund and co-workers have also built a highly sensitive microcalorimeter that can be used to measure temperature-dependent heats of adsorption on nanoparticle ensembles with aggregate sizes of about a hundred atoms. The fourth technique, called electron-spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, can be applied to study particle ensembles and may provide interesting information that is out of reach for other methods, the authors say.

Author: Hans Joachim Freund, Fritz-Haber Institut der Max-Planck Gesellschaft, Berlin (Germany), www.fhi-berlin.mpg.de/cp/hjf.epl

Title: Innovative Measurement Techniques in Surface Science

ChemPhysChem 2011, 12, No. 1, Permalink to the article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cphc.201000812

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © ChemPhysChem

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Nanoparticles present sustainable way to grow food crops May 1st, 2016

Searching for a nanotech self-organizing principle May 1st, 2016

Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering May 1st, 2016

Cooling graphene-based film close to pilot-scale production April 30th, 2016

Chemistry

Adding some salt to the recipe for energy storage materials: Researchers use common table salt as growth template April 22nd, 2016

NRL reveals novel uniform coating process of p-ALD April 21st, 2016

Team builds first quantum cascade laser on silicon: Eliminates the need for an external light source for mid-infrared silicon photonic devices or photonic circuits April 21st, 2016

McMaster researchers achieve a first by coaxing molecules into assembling themselves: Major advance creates the potential for useful new materials April 21st, 2016

Possible Futures

Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering May 1st, 2016

Cooling graphene-based film close to pilot-scale production April 30th, 2016

Personal cooling units on the horizon April 29th, 2016

Exploring phosphorene, a promising new material April 29th, 2016

Academic/Education

JPK reports on the use of a NanoWizard AFM system at the University of Kaiserslautern to study the interaction of bacteria with microstructured surfaces April 28th, 2016

The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute uses the ZetaView from Particle Metrix to study membrane microparticles as potential biomarkers for underlying diseases April 12th, 2016

FEI Partners with Five Pharmaceutical Companies, the Medical Research Council and the University of Cambridge to form Cryo-EM Research Consortium April 5th, 2016

SUNY Poly, in Collaboration with the George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences and Stony Brook University, Demonstrates Pioneering Method to Visualize and Identify Engineered Nanoparticles in Tissue March 25th, 2016

Announcements

Nanoparticles present sustainable way to grow food crops May 1st, 2016

Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering May 1st, 2016

Cooling graphene-based film close to pilot-scale production April 30th, 2016

Personal cooling units on the horizon April 29th, 2016

Tools

Exploring phosphorene, a promising new material April 29th, 2016

JPK reports on the use of a NanoWizard AFM system at the University of Kaiserslautern to study the interaction of bacteria with microstructured surfaces April 28th, 2016

Chemists use DNA to build the world's tiniest thermometer April 27th, 2016

Bruker Introduces Dimension FastScan Pro Industrial AFM: Providing Nanometer-Resolution at High Scan Rates for up to 300-mm Samples April 26th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic