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Home > News > Polymer photovoltaics may rival semiconductor-based cells

November 16th, 2010

Polymer photovoltaics may rival semiconductor-based cells

Abstract:
The use of polymer-based photovoltaic cells is on the rise, mostly because their advantages over semiconductor-based cells are becoming increasingly obvious. Their efficiency and low cost of manufacture as a source of renewable energy is of commercial interest and, with a great deal of research going on, accurate accounts of the morphology involved are increasingly necessary.

A new study, by scientists at the University of Delaware and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, is providing this type of understanding. One approach they have taken is to use a light-absorbing polymer in combination with a derivative of a sixty-carbon fullerene molecule, also known as a buckyball. In order to achieve the greatest efficiency, thin layers of each material must be present near opposite electrodes, as most analytical methods are not able to sufficiently distinguish between polymer and the buckyball to characterize the plastic solar cell film.

Source:
materialstoday.com

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