Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > New Nano Techniques Integrate Electron Gas-Producing Oxides With Silicon

University of Wisconsin-Madison Materials Science and Engineering Professor Chang-Beom Eom
University of Wisconsin-Madison Materials Science and Engineering Professor Chang-Beom Eom

Abstract:
In cold weather, many children can't resist breathing onto a window and writing in the condensation. Now imagine the window as an electronic device platform, the condensation as a special conductive gas, and the letters as lines of nanowires.

A team led by University of Wisconsin-Madison Materials Science and Engineering Professor Chang-Beom Eom has demonstrated methods to harness essentially this concept for broad applications in nanoelectronic devices, such as next-generation memory or tiny transistors. The discoveries were published Tuesday, Oct. 19 by the journal Nature Communications.

New Nano Techniques Integrate Electron Gas-Producing Oxides With Silicon

Madison, WI | Posted on October 20th, 2010

Eom's team has developed techniques to produce structures based on electronic oxides that can be integrated on a silicon substrate-the most common electronic device platform.

"The structures we have developed, as well as other oxide-based electronic devices, are likely to be very important in nanoelectronic applications, when integrated with silicon," Eom says.

The term "oxide" refers to a compound with oxygen as a fundamental element. Oxides include millions of compounds, each with unique properties that could be valuable in electronics and nanoelectronics.

Usually, oxide materials cannot be grown on silicon because oxides and silicon have different, incompatible crystal structures. Eom's technique combines single-crystal expitaxy, postannealing and etching to create a process that permits the oxide structure to reside on silicon-a significant accomplishment that solves a very complex challenge.

The new process allows the team to form a structure that puts three-atom-thick layers of lanthanum-aluminum-oxide in contact with strontium-titanium-oxide and then put the entire structure on top of a silicon substrate.

These two oxides are important because an "electron gas" forms at the interface of their layers, and a scanning probe microscope can make this gas layer conductive. The tip of the microscope is dragged along the surface with nanometer-scale accuracy, leaving behind a pattern of electrons that make the one-nanometer-thick gas layer. Using the tip, Eom's team can "draw" lines of these electrons and form conducting nanowires. The researchers also can "erase" those lines to take away conductivity in a region of the gas.

In order to integrate the oxides on silicon, the crystals must have a low level of defects, and researchers must have atomic control of the interface. More specifically, the top layer of strontium-titanium-oxide has to be totally pure and match up with a totally pure layer of lanthanum-oxide at the bottom of the lanthanum-aluminum-oxide; otherwise, the gas layer won't form between the oxide layers. Finally, the entire structure has been tuned to be compatible with the
underlying silicon.

Eom's team includes UW-Madison Physics Professor Mark Rzchowski, postdocs and graduate students in materials science and engineering and physics, as well as collaborators from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and the University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The National Science Foundation supports the research.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Sandra Knisely
(608) 265-8592


Chang-Beom Eom
(608) 263-6305




Copyright © University of Wisconsin-Madison

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Tissue regeneration using anti-inflammatory nanomolecules August 22nd, 2014

A breakthrough in imaging gold nanoparticles to atomic resolution by electron microscopy August 22nd, 2014

Ultra-short pulse lasers & Positioning August 21st, 2014

Malvern’s Dr Alan Rawle talks TLAs in plenary lecture at Particulate Systems Analysis conference August 21st, 2014

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Shaping the Future of Nanocrystals: Berkeley Lab Researchers Obtain First Direct Observation of Facet Formation in Nanocubes August 21st, 2014

Success in Intracellular Imaging of Cesium Distribution in Plants Used for Cesium Absorption August 19th, 2014

Electrical engineers take major step toward photonic circuits: Team invents non-metallic metamaterial that enables them to 'compress' and contain light August 19th, 2014

Promising Ferroelectric Materials Suffer From Unexpected Electric Polarizations: Brookhaven Lab scientists find surprising locked charge polarizations that impede performance in next-gen materials that could otherwise revolutionize data-driven devices August 18th, 2014

Academic/Education

SEMATECH and Newly Merged SUNY CNSE/SUNYIT Launch New Patterning Center to Further Advance Materials Development: Center to Provide Access to Critical Tools that Support Semiconductor Technology Node Development August 7th, 2014

Oxford Instruments Asylum Research and the Center for Nanoscale Systems at Harvard University Present a Workshop on AFM Nanomechanical and Nanoelectrical Characterization, Aug. 21-22 August 6th, 2014

University of Manchester selects Anasys AFM-IR for coatings and corrosion research July 30th, 2014

Haydale Announces Collaboration Agreement with Swansea University’s Welsh Centre for Printing and Coatings (WCPC) July 12th, 2014

Chip Technology

Electrical engineers take major step toward photonic circuits: Team invents non-metallic metamaterial that enables them to 'compress' and contain light August 19th, 2014

Promising Ferroelectric Materials Suffer From Unexpected Electric Polarizations: Brookhaven Lab scientists find surprising locked charge polarizations that impede performance in next-gen materials that could otherwise revolutionize data-driven devices August 18th, 2014

AI Technology (AIT) Introduces Novel High Temperature Large Area Underfill with Proven Stress Absorption August 15th, 2014

Iranian Scientists Stabilize Protein on Highly Stable Electrode Surface August 14th, 2014

Nanoelectronics

A*STAR and industry form S$200M semiconductor R&D July 25th, 2014

A Crystal Wedding in the Nanocosmos July 23rd, 2014

3-D nanostructure could benefit nanoelectronics, gas storage: Rice U. researchers predict functional advantages of 3-D boron nitride July 15th, 2014

IBM Announces $3 Billion Research Initiative to Tackle Chip Grand Challenges for Cloud and Big Data Systems: Scientists and engineers to push limits of silicon technology to 7 nanometers and below and create post-silicon future July 10th, 2014

Discoveries

Tissue regeneration using anti-inflammatory nanomolecules August 22nd, 2014

A breakthrough in imaging gold nanoparticles to atomic resolution by electron microscopy August 22nd, 2014

Shaping the Future of Nanocrystals: Berkeley Lab Researchers Obtain First Direct Observation of Facet Formation in Nanocubes August 21st, 2014

Water window imaging opportunity: A new theoretical study elucidates mechanisms that could help in producing coherent radiations, ultimately promoting high-contrast imaging of biological samples August 21st, 2014

Announcements

Tissue regeneration using anti-inflammatory nanomolecules August 22nd, 2014

A breakthrough in imaging gold nanoparticles to atomic resolution by electron microscopy August 22nd, 2014

Malvern’s Dr Alan Rawle talks TLAs in plenary lecture at Particulate Systems Analysis conference August 21st, 2014

Water window imaging opportunity: A new theoretical study elucidates mechanisms that could help in producing coherent radiations, ultimately promoting high-contrast imaging of biological samples August 21st, 2014

Research partnerships

A breakthrough in imaging gold nanoparticles to atomic resolution by electron microscopy August 22nd, 2014

Сalculations with Nanoscale Smart Particles August 19th, 2014

Promising Ferroelectric Materials Suffer From Unexpected Electric Polarizations: Brookhaven Lab scientists find surprising locked charge polarizations that impede performance in next-gen materials that could otherwise revolutionize data-driven devices August 18th, 2014

Nano Bonds Increase Raw Strength of Fireproof Concretes August 18th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE