Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors


Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > SBU Biomedical Engineering Professor Receives NIH New Innovator Award For Bone Tissue Healing Technology

Dr. Balaji Sitharaman, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Stony Brook University, received the 2010 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director’s New Innovator Award. The $1.5 million NIH Grant will be used for laboratory research on the use of a nanotechnology-based method to diagnose and treat bone loss.
Dr. Balaji Sitharaman, Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Stony Brook University, received the 2010 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director’s New Innovator Award. The $1.5 million NIH Grant will be used for laboratory research on the use of a nanotechnology-based method to diagnose and treat bone loss.

Abstract:
Dr. Balaji Sitharaman Proposes a Nanotechnology-Based Non-Invasive Diagnostic/Therapeutic

SBU Biomedical Engineering Professor Receives NIH New Innovator Award For Bone Tissue Healing Technology

Stony Brook, NY | Posted on October 13th, 2010

Balaji Sitharaman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Stony Brook University, is a 2010 recipient of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director's New Innovator Award. Only a select group of early-career biomedical researchers nationwide receive this award, which includes a 5-year $1.5 million grant. Dr. Sitharaman is engineering a nanotechnology-based theranostic (integrating therapeutic and diagnostic) technology for combined non-invasive imaging and targeted treatment of bone loss, a major health problem worldwide due to trauma, disease, and aging, including menopause.

The NIH Director's New Innovative Award was created as part of the NIH's commitment to increasing opportunities for new scientists who are exceptionally creative and propose highly innovative research projects. The NIH touts these investigators as having bold ideas that have the potential to catapult fields forward and speed the translation of research into improved health.

"The NIH is pleased to be supporting early-stage investigators from across the country who are taking considered risks in a wide range of areas in order to accelerate research," says Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., Director of the NIH. "We look forward to the results of their work."

"Securing the NIH grant is a terrific achievement for Dr. Sitharaman, and his work helps support critical research and technology development in the bioengineering of bone healing," says Clinton T. Rubin, Ph.D., Director of the Center for Biotechnology, Distinguished SUNY Professor, and Chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at SBU.

"Receipt of this NIH award for Dr. Sitharaman's laboratory is a great reflection on the creativity and quality of our School of Medicine faculty, the Department of Biomedical Engineering, and collaborative medical research at the University," adds Kenneth Kaushansky, M.D., Senior Vice President, Health Sciences, and Dean, SBU School of Medicine.

Dr. Sitharaman's proposed technology applies bone tissue engineering strategies and harnesses the physical properties of multifunctional nanonmaterials, which are single-walled carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles, and ultrasonic waves generated by a surface due to the absorption of pulsed laser light known as the photoacoustic (PA) effect.

"This is an innovative approach of treatment involving biophysical stimulation to differentiate progenitor cells to become bone cells, thereby enhancing the quality and quantity of bone formation in an exposed area," explains Dr. Sitharaman. "We believe this work will provide new insights into the process of bone formation and how to treat bone loss, and lay the scientific foundation for future development of this theranostic technology."

"Dr. Sitharaman's groundbreaking work in nano-medicine is a superb example of the integration of materials science and medicine," says Yacov Shamash, Ph.D., Vice President for Economic Development, and Dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Science at SBU. "The technology is a promising one in the frontiers of health care that could eventually help millions."

Dr. Sitharaman envisions this technology upon complete development to be widely available in clinical settings. He contends it will be a safe, user-friendly technology, and suitable for patient populations in which standing is difficult, such as the frail, elderly, or those with spinal cord injuries.

The Department of Biomedical Engineering at Stony Brook University is one of 25 departments within the School of Medicine and is part of the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Established in 2000, the department includes more than 60 faculty training students in undergraduate, MS and PhD programs. Areas of research emphasis include Biomechanics & Biomaterials, Bioelectricity & Bioimaging, Tissue Engineering, Bioinstrumentation and Biosignal Processing, and Cell & Molecular Bioengineering.

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © Stony Brook University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Simple attraction: Researchers control protein release from nanoparticles without encapsulation: U of T Engineering discovery stands to improve reliability and fabrication process for treatments to conditions such as spinal cord damage and stroke May 28th, 2016

Scientists illuminate a hidden regulator in gene transcription: New super-resolution technique visualizes important role of short-lived enzyme clusters May 27th, 2016

Doubling down on Schrödinger's cat May 27th, 2016

Deep Space Industries and SFL selected to provide satellites for HawkEye 360’s Pathfinder mission: The privately-funded space-based global wireless signal monitoring system will be developed by Deep Space Industries and UTIAS Space Flight Laboratory May 26th, 2016

Academic/Education

Graphene: Progress, not quantum leaps May 23rd, 2016

Smithsonian Science Education Center and National Space Society Team Up for Next-Generation Space Education Program "Enterprise In Space" May 11th, 2016

The University of Colorado Boulder, USA, combines Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation for improved materials characterisation May 9th, 2016

Albertan Science Lab Opens in India May 7th, 2016

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes

Programmable materials find strength in molecular repetition May 23rd, 2016

Nanotubes are beacons in cancer-imaging technique: Rice University researchers use spectral triangulation to pinpoint location of tumors May 21st, 2016

Unveiling the electron's motion in a carbon nanocoil: Development of a precise resistivity measurement system for quasi-one-dimensional nanomaterials using a focused ion beam May 16th, 2016

New research shows how silver could be the key to gold-standard flexible gadgets: Silver nanowires are an ideal material for current and future flexible touch-screen technologies May 13th, 2016

Nanomedicine

Simple attraction: Researchers control protein release from nanoparticles without encapsulation: U of T Engineering discovery stands to improve reliability and fabrication process for treatments to conditions such as spinal cord damage and stroke May 28th, 2016

Scientists illuminate a hidden regulator in gene transcription: New super-resolution technique visualizes important role of short-lived enzyme clusters May 27th, 2016

Supercrystals with new architecture can enhance drug synthesis May 24th, 2016

Nanoscale Trojan horses treat inflammation May 24th, 2016

Announcements

Simple attraction: Researchers control protein release from nanoparticles without encapsulation: U of T Engineering discovery stands to improve reliability and fabrication process for treatments to conditions such as spinal cord damage and stroke May 28th, 2016

Scientists illuminate a hidden regulator in gene transcription: New super-resolution technique visualizes important role of short-lived enzyme clusters May 27th, 2016

Doubling down on Schrödinger's cat May 27th, 2016

Deep Space Industries and SFL selected to provide satellites for HawkEye 360’s Pathfinder mission: The privately-funded space-based global wireless signal monitoring system will be developed by Deep Space Industries and UTIAS Space Flight Laboratory May 26th, 2016

Grants/Awards/Scholarships/Gifts/Contests/Honors/Records

Scientists illuminate a hidden regulator in gene transcription: New super-resolution technique visualizes important role of short-lived enzyme clusters May 27th, 2016

Finding a new formula for concrete: Researchers look to bones and shells as blueprints for stronger, more durable concrete May 26th, 2016

Light can 'heal' defects in new solar cell materials: Defects in some new electronic materials can be removed by making ions move under illumination May 24th, 2016

Supercrystals with new architecture can enhance drug synthesis May 24th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic