Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors



Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Student’s Discovery Advances Nanotech Research

Materials science graduate student Muge Acik has been working with graphene, a single sheet of carbon that exhibits unique electronic and mechanical properties.
Materials science graduate student Muge Acik has been working with graphene, a single sheet of carbon that exhibits unique electronic and mechanical properties.

Abstract:
Enhanced, Ultra-Thin Sheets of Carbon Hold Promise in Sensor Applications

Student’s Discovery Advances Nanotech Research

Richardson, TX | Posted on October 7th, 2010

A UT Dallas graduate student's surprising research results could ultimately lead to high-performance nanoelectronics applications such as electron emitters, thermal-infrared night-vision sensors and solar absorbers for harvesting sunlight.

Materials science graduate student Muge Acik has been working with graphene, a single sheet of carbon that exhibits unique electronic and mechanical properties, making it a candidate to eventually replace silicon in applications like ultrafast transistors.

Making real-world devices from graphene, however, depends upon controlling the edges of graphene sheets, which often dictate the material's electronic properties. Simply adding oxygen atoms at the edges may turn graphene into an insulator.

Performing her experimental work on graphene oxide (GO) in Dr. Yves Chabal's Laboratory for Surface and Nanostructure Modification, Acik discovered a new infrared absorption mechanism when GO is annealed to about 850°C to remove most oxygen. The result was a very special arrangement of oxygen atoms at the edges. This stable configuration fosters the electronic conduction or emission necessary for device operation and for electron emitters.

Moreover, "this new phenomenon opens the door to tailoring giant infrared absorption at different spectral positions by modifying the nature of the edge termination," she and her co-investigators concluded. And that opens the door to employing graphene in a number of nanoelectronic applications in which infrared absorption is important, such as night-vision sensors and sunlight-harvesting solar absorbers.

"This work is a good example where the contribution from theory has been critical, as provided by Dr. G. Lee, a postdoctoral fellow working under the supervision of Dr. Kyeongjae ‘KJ' Cho," said Chabal, head of materials science and engineering and holder of the Texas Instruments Distinguished University Chair in Nanoelectronics. "The theory provided a detailed understanding of this new phenomenon that would have remained puzzling on its own."

Cho added that "this experimental finding is consistent with an earlier theoretical prediction of the metallic state of graphene edge oxide published in Physical Review in 2009."

The team's results recently appeared in the journal Nature Materials in an article titled "Unusual Infrared Absorption Mechanism in Thermally Reduced Graphene Oxide."

This absorption is a new phenomenon that's unique to graphene, according to Chabal in an article that appeared in nanotechweb.org, noting that the potential applications are very exciting.

"The effect cannot be explained by simple infrared absorption mechanisms and can only happen if free, mobile electrons are induced in reduced graphene oxide - something that has never been observed before," the article concluded.

The research was funded by the Semiconductor Research Corp.'s Nanotechnology Research Initiative and by Texas Instruments. The work was done in collaboration with Cecilia Mattevi and Manish Chhowalla at Rutgers University. A synopsis of the Nature Materials article is featured under Nano Focus here.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Media Contact: David Moore, UT Dallas, (972) 883-4183,

Office of Media Relations, UT Dallas, (972) 883-2155,

Copyright © University of Texas at Dallas

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Quantum physics just got less complicated December 22nd, 2014

Enzyme Biosensor Used for Rapid Measurement of Drug December 22nd, 2014

Universality of charge order in cuprate superconductors: Charge order has been established in another class of cuprate superconductors, highlighting the importance of the phenomenon as a general property of these high-Tc materials December 22nd, 2014

Scientists reveal breakthrough in optical fiber communications December 21st, 2014

Possible Futures

A novel method for identifying the body’s ‘noisiest’ networks November 19th, 2014

Researchers discern the shapes of high-order Brownian motions November 17th, 2014

VDMA Electronics Production Equipment: Growth track for 2014 and 2015 confirmed: Business climate survey shows robust industry sector November 14th, 2014

Open Materials Development Will Be Key for HP's Success in 3D Printing: HP can make a big splash in 3D printing, but it needs to shore up technology claims and avoid the temptation of the razor/razor blade business model in order to flourish November 11th, 2014

Academic/Education

SUNY Poly NanoCollege Faculty Member Selected as American Physical Society Fellow: SUNY Poly Associate Professor of Nanoscience Dr. Vincent LaBella Recognized for Significant Technological Innovations that Enable Interactive Learning December 17th, 2014

Nanomedicine expert joins Rice faculty: Gang Bao combines genetic, nano and imaging techniques to fight disease December 17th, 2014

FEI and Oregon Health & Science University Install a Complete Correlative Microscopy Workflow in Newly Built Collaborative Science Facility December 16th, 2014

Student Nanotechnology Laboratories Network Set Up in Iran December 15th, 2014

Chip Technology

Instant-start computers possible with new breakthrough December 19th, 2014

Switching to spintronics: Berkeley Lab reports on electric field switching of ferromagnetism at room temp December 17th, 2014

Pb islands in a sea of graphene magnetise the material of the future December 16th, 2014

Stanford team combines logic, memory to build a 'high-rise' chip: Today circuit cards are laid out like single-story towns; Futuristic architecture builds layers of logic and memory into skyscraper chips that would be smaller, faster, cheaper -- and taller December 15th, 2014

Sensors

Enzyme Biosensor Used for Rapid Measurement of Drug December 22nd, 2014

Promising new method for rapidly screening cancer drugs: UMass Amherst researchers invent fast, accurate new nanoparticle-based sensor system December 15th, 2014

Graphene Applied in Production of Recyclable Electrodes December 13th, 2014

Detecting gases wirelessly and cheaply: New sensor can transmit information on hazardous chemicals or food spoilage to a smartphone December 8th, 2014

Nanoelectronics

Stacking two-dimensional materials may lower cost of semiconductor devices December 11th, 2014

Defects are perfect in laser-induced graphene: Rice University lab discovers simple way to make material for energy storage, electronics December 10th, 2014

Nanoscale resistors for quantum devices: The electrical characteristics of new thin-film chromium oxide resistors that can be tuned by controlling the oxygen content detailed in the 'Journal of Applied Physics' December 9th, 2014

'Giant' charge density disturbances discovered in nanomaterials: Juelich researchers amplify Friedel oscillations in thin metallic films November 26th, 2014

Discoveries

Quantum physics just got less complicated December 22nd, 2014

Enzyme Biosensor Used for Rapid Measurement of Drug December 22nd, 2014

Universality of charge order in cuprate superconductors: Charge order has been established in another class of cuprate superconductors, highlighting the importance of the phenomenon as a general property of these high-Tc materials December 22nd, 2014

Scientists reveal breakthrough in optical fiber communications December 21st, 2014

Announcements

Quantum physics just got less complicated December 22nd, 2014

Enzyme Biosensor Used for Rapid Measurement of Drug December 22nd, 2014

Universality of charge order in cuprate superconductors: Charge order has been established in another class of cuprate superconductors, highlighting the importance of the phenomenon as a general property of these high-Tc materials December 22nd, 2014

Scientists reveal breakthrough in optical fiber communications December 21st, 2014

Energy

Oregon researchers glimpse pathway of sunlight to electricity: Collaboration with Lund University uses modified UO spectroscopy equipment to study 'maze' of connections in photoactive quantum dots December 19th, 2014

How does enzymatic pretreatment affect the nanostructure and reaction space of lignocellulosic biomass? December 18th, 2014

Iranian Scientists Use Nanotechnology to Increase Power, Energy of Supercapacitors December 18th, 2014

Lifeboat Foundation gives 2014 Guardian Award to Elon Musk December 16th, 2014

Solar/Photovoltaic

Oregon researchers glimpse pathway of sunlight to electricity: Collaboration with Lund University uses modified UO spectroscopy equipment to study 'maze' of connections in photoactive quantum dots December 19th, 2014

Lifeboat Foundation gives 2014 Guardian Award to Elon Musk December 16th, 2014

Stacking two-dimensional materials may lower cost of semiconductor devices December 11th, 2014

New Technique Could Harvest More of the Sun's Energy December 9th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE