Nanotechnology Now





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Renewable and Clean

Abstract:
New kind of fuel cell delivers energy and fine chemicals with no waste from renewable raw materials

Renewable and Clean

Weinheim, Germany | Posted on October 1st, 2010

The concept of converting renewable raw materials so cleverly that the same process simultaneously produces both energy and industrially desirable chemicals has been high on the wish-list for those who seek environmentally friendly and resource-saving chemistry. The process should also not release any carbon dioxide. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Hansjörg Grützmacher, Francesco Vizza, and Claudio Bianchini and their co-workers from the ETH in Zürich (Switzerland) and the Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR) in Sesto Fiorentino (Italy) have now introduced a new kind of fuel cell: an organometallic fuel cell that efficiently converts alcohols and sugars into carboxylic acids.

Differing from established alcohol fuel cells—the direct alcohol fuel cell and the enzymatic biofuel cell—the organometallic fuel cell (OMFC) works in a completely different way. The secret behind its success is a special molecular complex of rhodium metal that functions as an anode catalyst. The scientists deposited the complex onto a carbon powder support. The interesting thing is that the active catalyst forms during the chemical reaction, and changes step-by-step throughout the catalytic cycle. In this way, a single metal complex forms different catalysts that are each specific for an individual reaction step: the conversion of an alcohol (e.g. ethanol) into the corresponding aldehyde, making the aldehyde into the corresponding carboxylic acid (e.g. acetic acid), and transferring protons (H+) and electrons. As well as alcohols, this system can also convert sugars such as glucose in the same way.

The researchers hope that their new approach could turn out to be a breakthrough in fuel-cell technology. A particular advantage of their new method is that molecular metal complexes are soluble in various solvents, which allows them to be very finely dispersed over very small surfaces. In addition, they provide a very high power density. This could be a way to further miniaturize fuel cells for use as power sources for biological applications like heart pacemakers and biosensors, as well as for the in-vivo monitoring of metabolic processes.

Through the right combination of a tailored molecular catalyst structure and a suitable support material, it could be possible to develop future fuel cells that very selectively convert starting materials with multiple alcohol groups into valuable premium chemicals without the generation of waste materials. This task is very difficult to accomplish by traditional methods.

Author: Hansjörg Grützmacher, ETH Zürich (Switzerland), www.gruetzmacher.ethz.ch/people/hansjoerg

Title: A Biologically Inspired Organometallic Fuel Cell (OMFC) That Converts Renewable Alcohols into Energy and Chemicals

Angewandte Chemie International Edition 2010, 49, No. 40, 7229-7233, Permalink to the article: dx.doi.org/10.1002/anie.201002234

####

For more information, please click here

Copyright © Angewandte Chemie International Edition

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

TCL Unveils First 65” TV Featuring QD Vision’s Color IQ™ Quantum Dot Technology: Emerging industry leader introduces expanded quantum dot TV lineup May 30th, 2015

Nanotech Secures Additional Patents in Advanced Security Features: New patented features gain attention from the banknote industry May 30th, 2015

New 'designer carbon' from Stanford boosts battery performance May 30th, 2015

Two UCSB Professors Receive Early Career Research Awards: The Department of Energy’s award for young scientists acknowledges UC Santa Barbara’s standing as a top tier research institution May 29th, 2015

Possible Futures

Global Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) Market Expected To Reach USD 3.42 Billion By 2022 May 29th, 2015

Global Nano-Enabled Packaging Market For Food and Beverages Will Reach $15.0 billion in 2020 May 26th, 2015

Simulations predict flat liquid May 21st, 2015

Nature inspires first artificial molecular pump: Simple design mimics pumping mechanism of life-sustaining proteins found in living cells May 19th, 2015

Sensors

SouthWest NanoTechnologies Introduces AgeNT™ Transparent Conductor System at SID Display Week, Booth #543 May 28th, 2015

Technology for Tomorrow’s Market Opportunities and Challenges: LetiDays Grenoble Presents the Possibilities: June 24-25 Event Includes Focus on IoT-Augmented Mobility and Leti’s Latest Results on Silicon Technologies, Sensors, Health Applications and Smart Cities May 27th, 2015

This Slinky lookalike 'hyperlens' helps us see tiny objects: The photonics advancement could improve early cancer detection, nanoelectronics manufacturing and scientists' ability to observe single molecules May 23rd, 2015

Record high sensitive Graphene Hall sensors May 21st, 2015

Announcements

TCL Unveils First 65” TV Featuring QD Vision’s Color IQ™ Quantum Dot Technology: Emerging industry leader introduces expanded quantum dot TV lineup May 30th, 2015

Nanotech Secures Additional Patents in Advanced Security Features: New patented features gain attention from the banknote industry May 30th, 2015

New 'designer carbon' from Stanford boosts battery performance May 30th, 2015

Two UCSB Professors Receive Early Career Research Awards: The Department of Energy’s award for young scientists acknowledges UC Santa Barbara’s standing as a top tier research institution May 29th, 2015

Environment

Collaboration could lead to biodegradable computer chips May 28th, 2015

Conversion of Greenhouse Gases to Syngas in Presence of Nanocatalysts in Iran May 22nd, 2015

Directa Plus in Barcelona to present the innovative project GEnIuS for oil spills clean-up activities: The company has created a graphene-based product for the remediation of water contaminated by oil and hydrocarbons May 21st, 2015

Nano-policing pollution May 13th, 2015

Fuel Cells

Unique microscopic images provide new insights into ionic liquids April 28th, 2015

Expanding the reach of metallic glass April 22nd, 2015

Newly-Developed Nanocatalysts Increase Performance of Fuel Cells April 16th, 2015

Cobalt film a clean-fuel find: Rice University discovery is efficient, robust at drawing hydrogen and oxygen from water April 15th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project