Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors
Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Submarines could use new nanotube technology for sonar and stealth

The application of solid-state fabricated carbon nanotube sheets as thermoacoustic projectors is extended from air to underwater applications, thereby providing surprising results. While the acoustic generation efficiency of a liquid immersed nanotube sheet is profoundly degraded by nanotube wetting, the hydrophobicity of the nanotube sheets in water results in an air envelope about the nanotubes that increases pressure generation efficiency a hundred-fold over that obtained by immersion in wetting alcohols. Due to nonresonant sound generation, the emission spectrum of a liquid-immersed nanotube sheet varies smoothly over a wide frequency range, 1−105 Hz. Copyright American Chemical Society
The application of solid-state fabricated carbon nanotube sheets as thermoacoustic projectors is extended from air to underwater applications, thereby providing surprising results. While the acoustic generation efficiency of a liquid immersed nanotube sheet is profoundly degraded by nanotube wetting, the hydrophobicity of the nanotube sheets in water results in an air envelope about the nanotubes that increases pressure generation efficiency a hundred-fold over that obtained by immersion in wetting alcohols. Due to nonresonant sound generation, the emission spectrum of a liquid-immersed nanotube sheet varies smoothly over a wide frequency range, 1−105 Hz. Copyright American Chemical Society

Abstract:
Speakers made from carbon nanotube sheets that are a fraction of the width of a human hair can both generate sound and cancel out noise -- properties ideal for submarine sonar to probe the ocean depths and make subs invisible to enemies. That's the topic of a report on these "nanotube speakers," which appears in ACS' Nano Letters, a monthly journal.

Submarines could use new nanotube technology for sonar and stealth

Richardson, TX | Posted on September 5th, 2010

Ali Aliev and colleagues explain that thin films of nanotubes can generate sound waves via a thermoacoustic effect. Every time that an electrical pulse passes through the microscopic layer of carbon tubes, the air around them heats up and creates a sound wave. Chinese scientists first discovered that effect in 2008, and applied it in building flexible speakers. In a remarkable demonstration, which made its way onto YouTube, the Chinese nanoscientists stuck a sheet of nanotubes onto the side of a flag, and attached it to an mp3 player. They used the nanotube-coated flag to play a song while it flapped in the breeze. But they did not test its ability to operate under water.

Aliev's group took that step, showing that nanotube sheets produce the kind of low-frequency sound waves that enable sonar to determine the location, depth, and speed of underwater objects. They also verified that the speakers can be tuned to specific frequencies to cancel out noise, such as the sound of a submarine moving through the depths.

Full Article: pubs.acs.org/stoken/presspac/presspac/full/10.1021/nl100235n

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Ali Aliev, Ph.D.
MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute
University of Texas at Dallas
Richardson, Texas 75083


Michael Bernstein

202-872-6042
American Chemical Society

Copyright © American Chemical Society

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Researchers show what drives a novel, ordered assembly of alternating peptides February 20th, 2020

CEA-Leti and CEA-IRIG Demonstrate Quantum Integrated Circuit Combining Quantum Dot with Digital-Analog Circuits on CMOS Chip: Presentation at ISSCC 2020 Shows Role FD-SOI Can Play in Embedding Qubit Arrays with Classic Electronics to Build Large-Scale Quantum Silicon Processors February 20th, 2020

CEA-Leti Presents High-Performance Processor Breakthrough With Active Interposer and 3D Stacked Chiplets at ISSCC 2020 February 19th, 2020

New green technology from UMass Amherst generates electricity 'out of thin air' Renewable device could help mitigate climate change, power medical devices February 17th, 2020

Marine/Watercraft

Researchers create new 'smart' material with potential biomedical, environmental uses November 23rd, 2018

Relax, just break it July 20th, 2018

Nanowrinkles could save billions in shipping and aquaculture Surfaces inspired by carnivorous plants delay degradation by marine fouling January 17th, 2018

'Quantum material' has shark-like ability to detect small electrical signals December 20th, 2017

Possible Futures

Researchers show what drives a novel, ordered assembly of alternating peptides February 20th, 2020

CEA-Leti and CEA-IRIG Demonstrate Quantum Integrated Circuit Combining Quantum Dot with Digital-Analog Circuits on CMOS Chip: Presentation at ISSCC 2020 Shows Role FD-SOI Can Play in Embedding Qubit Arrays with Classic Electronics to Build Large-Scale Quantum Silicon Processors February 20th, 2020

CEA-Leti Presents High-Performance Processor Breakthrough With Active Interposer and 3D Stacked Chiplets at ISSCC 2020 February 19th, 2020

New green technology from UMass Amherst generates electricity 'out of thin air' Renewable device could help mitigate climate change, power medical devices February 17th, 2020

Academic/Education

Matching Investment Program (MIP) Leverages $140K Empire State Development/NYSTAR Funding to SUNY Polyís CATN2 to Enable $1.5M in Matching Commitments from Industry Partners: Investment Funds Faculty Research Related to Advanced Materials, Genomics, and Semiconductor Reliability October 18th, 2019

A Quantum Leap: $25M grant makes UC Santa Barbara home to the nationís first NSF-funded Quantum Foundry, a center for development of materials for quantum information-based technologies September 16th, 2019

LPU signs MoU with Bruker India for Research Cooperation in Nanotechnology and Material Science September 3rd, 2019

RIT to upgrade Semiconductor and Microsystems Fabrication Laboratory through $1 million state grant: Upgrades to clean room will enhance universityís research capabilities in photonics, quantum technologies and smart systems August 16th, 2019

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes/Nanorods

The first highway trials show that nanotube-reinforced asphalt concrete prevents cracks and ruts January 16th, 2020

A new approach to making airplane parts, minus the massive infrastructure: Carbon nanotube film produces aerospace-grade composites with no need for huge ovens or autoclaves. January 13th, 2020

Color superlensing to assist in surpassing diffraction barrier: A paper by Kazan Federal University's Sergey Kharintsev appeared in Optics Letters January 3rd, 2020

Buckyballs release electron-positron pairs in forward directions: Theoretical calculations reveal that when impacted by positrons of particular energies, spherical nanoparticles release unstable electron-positron pairs, with signals dominating in the same direction as the incomin December 27th, 2019

Discoveries

Researchers show what drives a novel, ordered assembly of alternating peptides February 20th, 2020

New green technology from UMass Amherst generates electricity 'out of thin air' Renewable device could help mitigate climate change, power medical devices February 17th, 2020

Does graphene cause or prevent the corrosion of copper? New study finally settles the debate: Scientists in Korea are first to observe an unprecedented way in which graphene forms a hybrid layer that prevents copper corrosion February 14th, 2020

KIST unveils the mystery of van der Waals magnets, a material for future semiconductors: Overcoming the limits of current magnetic materials, giving hope for development of next-generation semiconductors February 14th, 2020

Announcements

CEA-Leti and CEA-IRIG Demonstrate Quantum Integrated Circuit Combining Quantum Dot with Digital-Analog Circuits on CMOS Chip: Presentation at ISSCC 2020 Shows Role FD-SOI Can Play in Embedding Qubit Arrays with Classic Electronics to Build Large-Scale Quantum Silicon Processors February 20th, 2020

CEA-Leti Presents High-Performance Processor Breakthrough With Active Interposer and 3D Stacked Chiplets at ISSCC 2020 February 19th, 2020

New green technology from UMass Amherst generates electricity 'out of thin air' Renewable device could help mitigate climate change, power medical devices February 17th, 2020

KIST unveils the mystery of van der Waals magnets, a material for future semiconductors: Overcoming the limits of current magnetic materials, giving hope for development of next-generation semiconductors February 14th, 2020

Military

SUNY Poly Professor Partners with Leading Institutions on NSF Award for Quantum Information Science Research: SUNY Poly Research Builds Upon Recent Quantum-related Research Initiatives and Workshops January 27th, 2020

Study finds billions of quantum entangled electrons in 'strange metal' Physicists provide direct evidence of entanglement's role in quantum criticality January 16th, 2020

Researchers gain control over internal structure of self-assembled composite materials January 16th, 2020

Nanomaterial fabric destroys nerve agents in battlefield-relevant conditions: Metal-organic framework-based composites donít need liquid water to work January 14th, 2020

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project