Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > News > Three questions for Ray Kurzweil

June 20th, 2010

Three questions for Ray Kurzweil

Abstract:
Q: You've written that advances in fields like genetics, nanotechnology and artificial intelligence will allow us to merge technology with our biology in a manner that will allow us to supplement our brains and bodies, creating superhuman abilities. It calls to mind "The Six Million Dollar Man" and raises countless questions about ethics, health care, equality, democracy and, of course, sports records. But I write for the business section, so I'll just ask this: What are the implications for private industry and the economy?

A: First of all, I would point out that this continues a long-standing trend. If we stayed with what was "natural," our life expectancy would be in the 20s.

Ultimately, intelligent devices will go inside our bodies and brains, and that is also a trend that has already started. If you have Parkinson's disease, you can put a computer inside your body, which connects into your brain, that replaces much of the functionality of the neurons destroyed by the disease.

One of the implications of the law of accelerating returns is that these technologies will be another billion times more powerful per dollar in 25 years and 100,000 times smaller in size. So we will be able to send very powerful yet extremely inexpensive computerized devices the size of blood cells into our bodies to keep us healthier and to make us smarter.

According to my models, we'll reach a tipping point in about 15 years where we will be adding more than a year each year to your remaining life expectancy.

Sometimes people ask whether these technologies will be enjoyed only by the wealthy. My response is to look at cell phones. Only the wealthy could afford the early models of mobile phones, which did not work very well. Today there are 5 billion cell phones for 6 billion people and they work relatively well and do many things besides making phone calls. Information-based technologies are affordable only by the rich at a point in time where they don't work very well. By the time they are perfected, they are almost free.

These are all information technologies. Despite the fact that information technology has a deflation rate of about 50 percent per year, we more than double our use of it each year because the improvements in price-performance make new applications feasible. This is in fact the source of economic growth. There has been 18 percent annual growth in every form of information technology for the past half century as measured in constant dollars, despite the fact that you can get twice as much of it each year for the same cost.

Source:
sfgate.com

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

New solar power material converts 90 percent of captured light into heat: SunShot Project aims to make solar cost competitive October 29th, 2014

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact October 29th, 2014

Microrockets fueled by water neutralize chemical and biological warfare agents October 29th, 2014

Nanosafety research – there’s room for improvement October 29th, 2014

Possible Futures

Imaging electric charge propagating along microbial nanowires October 20th, 2014

Superconducting circuits, simplified: New circuit design could unlock the power of experimental superconducting computer chips October 18th, 2014

Nanocoatings Market By Product Is Expected To Reach USD 8.17 Billion By 2020: Grand View Research, Inc. October 15th, 2014

Perpetuus Carbon Group Receives Independent Verification of its Production Capacity for Graphenes at 140 Tonnes per Annum: Perpetuus Becomes the First Manufacturer in the Sector to Allow Third Party Audit October 7th, 2014

Molecular Machines

Crystallizing the DNA nanotechnology dream: Scientists have designed the first large DNA crystals with precisely prescribed depths and complex 3D features, which could create revolutionary nanodevices October 20th, 2014

Optimum inertial design for self-propulsion: A new study investigates the effects of small but finite inertia on the propulsion of micro and nano-scale swimming machines July 29th, 2014

Breakthrough laser experiment reveals liquid-like motion of atoms in an ultra-cold cluster: University of Leicester research team unlocks insights into creation of new nano-materials July 25th, 2014

NIST shows ultrasonically propelled nanorods spin dizzyingly fast July 22nd, 2014

Molecular Nanotechnology

Crystallizing the DNA nanotechnology dream: Scientists have designed the first large DNA crystals with precisely prescribed depths and complex 3D features, which could create revolutionary nanodevices October 20th, 2014

Fast, cheap nanomanufacturing: Arrays of tiny conical tips that eject ionized materials could fabricate nanoscale devices cheaply October 4th, 2014

Nano-bearings on the test bench: Fullerene spheres can be used to slide in the nanoworld October 3rd, 2014

Penn Team Studies Nanocrystals by Passing Them Through Tiny Pores September 26th, 2014

Nanomedicine

'Electronic skin' could improve early breast cancer detection October 29th, 2014

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact October 29th, 2014

Molecular beacons shine light on how cells 'crawl' October 27th, 2014

New nanodevice to improve cancer treatment monitoring October 27th, 2014

Announcements

New solar power material converts 90 percent of captured light into heat: SunShot Project aims to make solar cost competitive October 29th, 2014

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact October 29th, 2014

Microrockets fueled by water neutralize chemical and biological warfare agents October 29th, 2014

Nanosafety research – there’s room for improvement October 29th, 2014

Nanobiotechnology

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact October 29th, 2014

Molecular beacons shine light on how cells 'crawl' October 27th, 2014

Breakthrough in molecular electronics paves the way for DNA-based computer circuits in the future: DNA-based programmable circuits could be more sophisticated, cheaper and simpler to make October 27th, 2014

NYU Researchers Break Nano Barrier to Engineer the First Protein Microfiber October 23rd, 2014

Life Extension/Cryonics

RF Heating of Magnetic Nanoparticles Improves the Thawing of Cryopreserved Biomaterials October 23rd, 2014

Conceptual Nanomedical Lipofuscin Removal Strategy April 29th, 2013

utsandiego.com November 22nd, 2012

Nanoparticles against aging October 3rd, 2012

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE





  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More














ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE