Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors


Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Silicon chips to enter world of high speed optical processing

An on-chip all-optical integrator under operation
An on-chip all-optical integrator under operation

Abstract:
Physicists at the University of Sydney have brought silicon chips closer to performing all-optical computing and information processing that could overcome the speed limitations intrinsic to electronics, with the first report published of an on-chip all-optical temporal integrator in Nature Communications today.

Silicon chips to enter world of high speed optical processing

Sydney | Posted on June 18th, 2010

An all-optical integrator, or lightwave capacitor, is a fundamental building block equivalent to those used in multi-functional electronic circuits.

Associate Professor David Moss, a senior researcher within the Institute for Photonic and Optical Science (IPOS), leads an international team which has developed the optical integrator on a CMOS compatible silicon chip.

The device, a photonic chip compatible with electronic technology (CMOS), will be a key enabler of next generation fully-integrated ultrafast optical data processing technologies for many applications including ultra-fast optical information-processing, optical memory, measurement, computing systems, and real-time differential equation computing units.

It is based on a passive micro-ring resonator and performs the time integral of an arbitrary optical waveform with a time resolution of a few picoseconds, corresponding to a processing speed of around 200 GHz, and with a "hold" time approaching a nanosecond.

This represents an unprecedented processing time-bandwidth product (TBP) - a principal figure of merit, defined as the ratio between the integration time window to the fastest time feature that can be accurately processed - approaching 100 - much higher than advanced passive electronic integrators where the TBP is less than 10.

The research has just been published in a paper entitled On-chip CMOS compatible all-optical integrator in the international journal, Nature Communications.

Associate Professor Moss said using light for ultrahigh speed information processing, computing, and storage on a silicon chip was an important breakthrough.

"With society's demands for even faster technology, ultrafast optical computing and signal processing are important," he said.

"This on-chip optical integrator is a key to enabling many optical functions on a chip, including ultra high speed signal processing, computing, and optical memory.

"This technology will ultimately provide the consumer with cheaper and faster computers."

The device, based on high index doped silica glass, is low loss and has a high degree of manufacturability and design flexibility. This makes it an ideal ultrahigh speed optical integrator with a performance good enough not just for optical computing but for a wide range of applications including optical memory, real-time differential equation computing units, and many others.

Associate Professor Moss is a researcher with the Centre for Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), an ARC Centre of Excellence.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Media enquiries
Rachel Gleeson
0403 067 342, 9351 4312,

Copyright © University of Sydney

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

GLOBALFOUNDRIES to Expand Presence in China with 300mm Fab in Chongqing: Company plans new manufacturing facility and additional design capabilities to serve customers in China May 31st, 2016

Nanobiotix establishes promising preclinical proof-of-concept in Immuno Oncology May 31st, 2016

UK NANOSAFETY GROUP publishes 2nd Edition of guidance to support safe working with nanomaterials May 30th, 2016

Fast, stretchy circuits could yield new wave of wearable electronics May 30th, 2016

Possible Futures

Fast, stretchy circuits could yield new wave of wearable electronics May 30th, 2016

Automating DNA origami opens door to many new uses: Like 3-D printing did for larger objects, method makes it easy to build nanoparticles out of DNA May 30th, 2016

Simple attraction: Researchers control protein release from nanoparticles without encapsulation: U of T Engineering discovery stands to improve reliability and fabrication process for treatments to conditions such as spinal cord damage and stroke May 28th, 2016

Doubling down on Schrödinger's cat May 27th, 2016

Academic/Education

Graphene: Progress, not quantum leaps May 23rd, 2016

Smithsonian Science Education Center and National Space Society Team Up for Next-Generation Space Education Program "Enterprise In Space" May 11th, 2016

The University of Colorado Boulder, USA, combines Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation for improved materials characterisation May 9th, 2016

Albertan Science Lab Opens in India May 7th, 2016

Chip Technology

GLOBALFOUNDRIES to Expand Presence in China with 300mm Fab in Chongqing: Company plans new manufacturing facility and additional design capabilities to serve customers in China May 31st, 2016

Fast, stretchy circuits could yield new wave of wearable electronics May 30th, 2016

Gigantic ultrafast spin currents: Scientists from TU Wien (Vienna) are proposing a new method for creating extremely strong spin currents. They are essential for spintronics, a technology that could replace today's electronics May 25th, 2016

Diamonds closer to becoming ideal semiconductors: Researchers find new method for doping single crystals of diamond May 25th, 2016

Optical computing/Photonic computing

Attosecond physics: A switch for light-wave electronics May 24th, 2016

Photon collisions: Photonic billiards might be the newest game! May 20th, 2016

UW researchers unleash graphene 'tiger' for more efficient optoelectronics May 16th, 2016

How light is detected affects the atom that emits it: An experiment suggests it might be possible to control atoms entangled with the light they emit by manipulating detection May 15th, 2016

Nanoelectronics

Researchers demonstrate size quantization of Dirac fermions in graphene: Characterization of high-quality material reveals important details relevant to next generation nanoelectronic devices May 20th, 2016

Graphene: A quantum of current - When current comes in discrete packages: Viennese scientists unravel the quantum properties of the carbon material graphene May 20th, 2016

New type of graphene-based transistor will increase the clock speed of processors: Scientists have developed a new type of graphene-based transistor and using modeling they have demonstrated that it has ultralow power consumption compared with other similar transistor devices May 19th, 2016

Self-healing, flexible electronic material restores functions after many breaks May 17th, 2016

Announcements

GLOBALFOUNDRIES to Expand Presence in China with 300mm Fab in Chongqing: Company plans new manufacturing facility and additional design capabilities to serve customers in China May 31st, 2016

Nanobiotix establishes promising preclinical proof-of-concept in Immuno Oncology May 31st, 2016

UK NANOSAFETY GROUP publishes 2nd Edition of guidance to support safe working with nanomaterials May 30th, 2016

Fast, stretchy circuits could yield new wave of wearable electronics May 30th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic