Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > The World’s First Diamond Nanoprobe Tips Demonstrate Success in Nanomanufacturing

The resistively heated probe can reach temperatures above 600 °C. The batch fabrication process produces UNCD tips with radii as small as 15 nm, with average radius 50 nm across the entire wafer. Wear tests were performed on substrates of quartz, silicon carbide, silicon, or UNCD. Tips were scanned for more than 1 m at a scan speed of 25 μm s−1 at temperatures ranging from 25 to 400 °C under loads up to 200 nN.  Credit: ACS
The resistively heated probe can reach temperatures above 600 °C. The batch fabrication process produces UNCD tips with radii as small as 15 nm, with average radius 50 nm across the entire wafer. Wear tests were performed on substrates of quartz, silicon carbide, silicon, or UNCD. Tips were scanned for more than 1 m at a scan speed of 25 μm s−1 at temperatures ranging from 25 to 400 °C under loads up to 200 nN. Credit: ACS

Abstract:
Advanced Diamond Technologies (ADT), the Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the Univ. of Pennsylvania have published groundbreaking work in the May 2010 issue of the journal ACS Nano demonstrating that nanometer-scale diamond tips exhibit stability and anti-fouling capabilities under extremely harsh conditions.

The World’s First Diamond Nanoprobe Tips Demonstrate Success in Nanomanufacturing

Romeoville, IL | Posted on June 18th, 2010

"Wear-resistant Diamond Nanoprobe Tips with Integrated Silicon Heater for Tip-Based Nanomanufacturing," demonstrates the ability of UNCD tips integrated with doped silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers for use in nanomanufacturing. The initial UNCD tip radius can be as small as 15 nm, and retains its shape when scanned for more than a meter at high temperatures and under high loading forces. Silicon tips, frequently used in prototype nanomanufacturing demonstrations, are quickly destroyed under similar conditions. Additionally, silicon tips easily foul, or pick up undesirable material from the scanned surface, while the low stiction properties of diamond avoid fouling.

"The UNCD probe tip, integrated onto a silicon heater-thermometer, has extraordinary longevity and demonstrates success under the harsh conditions required for tip-based nanofabrication," said team leader Dr. William P. King, associate professor and Willett Faculty Scholar at the Univ. of Illinois. "There are countless applications where we would like to have a nanoprobe scan over a hard surface at high temperature and high loading force."

Tip-based nanofabrication is the ability to use a nanometer-scale tip to imprint or write patterns onto a material; which is comparable to using a pencil to write on paper. In the nanoworld, writing tiny patterns is extremely difficult. Tip-based nanomanufacturing is currently used to fabricate or repair nanoelectronics or lithographic masks; a demanding job requiring the tip to scan long distances over hard substances.

"Diamond has long been considered the ideal tip material. This paper demonstrates how UNCD technology meets the challenge of demanding specifications of imaging and nanomaufacturing placed on the tip radius of dimensional stability; thus paving the way for probe-based technologies for a number of applications," said Dr. John Carlisle, chief technology officer, ADT.

These wear resistant diamond nanoprobe tips integrated with silicon heaters are perfectly suited for nanomaterials characterization, nanoscale transport measurements, and applications such as dip-pen nanolithography, probe-based non-volatile memories, and patterning nanowires on surfaces.

Next, the researchers will be building and using arrays of these probe tips. "The longevity of these probes allow them to be implemented in massively parallel arrays that could scan over long distances and at high speed," said Dr. King. "We can now think about using nanoprobe tip arrays to address many square centimeters of surface area. Eventually we'll go to nanoprobe scans on a meter scale."

ADT and its university partners gratefully acknowledge DARPA's Tip-Based Nanofabrication Program for sponsoring this work.

Study abstract
pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nn100203d?prevSearch=%255Bauthor%253A%2BKing%255D&searchHistoryKey

####

About Advanced Diamond Technologies
ADT is the world leader in the development of diamond for industrial, electronics, energy, and medical applications. ADT is a World Economic Forum 2007 Technology Pioneer, a recipient of a 2008 EuroAsia IC Award in the Materials Enabling category from EuroAsia Semiconductor magazine, and a 2008 R&D 100 Award winner for UNCD Seals (mechanical seals for pumps), and a 2009 R&D 100 Award winner for NaDiaProbes® (the world’s first all‐diamond AFM probes).

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
PR Contact
Jill Jackson
Calyx Consulting
312.231.9870

Copyright © Advanced Diamond Technologies

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Nanoscale view of energy storage January 16th, 2017

Chemistry on the edge: Experiments at Berkeley Lab confirm that structural defects at the periphery are key in catalyst function January 13th, 2017

Recreating conditions inside stars with compact lasers: Scientists offer a new path to creating the extreme conditions found in stars, using ultra-short laser pulses irradiating nanowires January 12th, 2017

Deciphering the beetle exoskeleton with nanomechanics: Understanding exoskeletons could lead to new, improved artificial materials January 12th, 2017

Possible Futures

Dressing a metal in various colors: DGIST research developed a technology to coat metal with several nanometers of semiconducting materials January 17th, 2017

Nanoscale view of energy storage January 16th, 2017

Seeing the quantum future... literally: What if big data could help you see the future and prevent your mobile phone from breaking before it happened? January 16th, 2017

NUS researchers achieve major breakthrough in flexible electronics: New classes of printable electrically conducting polymer materials make better electrodes for plastic electronics and advanced semiconductor devices January 14th, 2017

Academic/Education

Oxford Nanoimaging report on how the Nanoimager, a desktop microscope delivering single molecule, super-resolution performance, is being applied at the MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology & Infection November 22nd, 2016

The University of Applied Sciences in Upper Austria uses Deben tensile stages as an integral part of their computed tomography research and testing facility October 18th, 2016

Enterprise In Space Partners with Sketchfab and 3D Hubs for NewSpace Education October 13th, 2016

New Agricultural Research Center Debuts at UCF October 12th, 2016

Nanoelectronics

Nano-chimneys can cool circuits: Rice University scientists calculate tweaks to graphene would form phonon-friendly cones January 4th, 2017

Advance in intense pulsed light sintering opens door to improved electronics manufacturing December 23rd, 2016

Fast track control accelerates switching of quantum bits December 16th, 2016

GLOBALFOUNDRIES Demonstrates Industry-Leading 56Gbps Long-Reach SerDes on Advanced 14nm FinFET Process Technology: Proven ASIC IP solution will enable significant performance and power efficiency improvements for next-generation high-speed applications December 13th, 2016

Announcements

Dressing a metal in various colors: DGIST research developed a technology to coat metal with several nanometers of semiconducting materials January 17th, 2017

Nanoparticle exposure can awaken dormant viruses in the lungs January 17th, 2017

Nanoscale view of energy storage January 16th, 2017

Seeing the quantum future... literally: What if big data could help you see the future and prevent your mobile phone from breaking before it happened? January 16th, 2017

Tools

Distinguishing truth under the surface: electrostatic or mechanic December 31st, 2016

Nanomechanics Inc. Continues Growth in Revenue and Market Penetration: Leading nanoindentation company reports continued growth in revenues and distribution channels on national and international scales December 27th, 2016

Nanometrics to Present at the 19th Annual Needham Growth Conference December 22nd, 2016

Safe and inexpensive hydrogen production as a future energy source: Osaka University researchers develop efficient 'green' hydrogen production system that operates at room temperature in air December 21st, 2016

Research partnerships

Chemistry on the edge: Experiments at Berkeley Lab confirm that structural defects at the periphery are key in catalyst function January 13th, 2017

Recreating conditions inside stars with compact lasers: Scientists offer a new path to creating the extreme conditions found in stars, using ultra-short laser pulses irradiating nanowires January 12th, 2017

Zeroing in on the true nature of fluids within nanocapillaries: While exploring the behavior of fluids at the nanoscale, a group of researchers at the French National Center for Scientific Research discovered a peculiar state of fluid mixtures contained in microscopic channels January 11th, 2017

New active filaments mimic biology to transport nano-cargo: A new design for a fully biocompatible motility engine transports colloidal particles faster than diffusion with active filaments January 11th, 2017

New-Contracts/Sales/Customers

Cetim Facility Receives Bruker Contour CMM Dimensional Analysis System: New Optical Coordinate Measurement Technology Enables High-Precision 3D Scanning November 16th, 2016

Industrial Nanotech, Inc. Announces Plans to Spin Off New Product Line to Major Paint Compan November 9th, 2016

Leti Provides New Low-noise Image Technology to French SME PYXALIS; Will Be Demonstrated at Vision 2016 in Stuttgart November 3rd, 2016

DryWired's Liquid Nanotint to be the first nano-insulation in a Federal building: 250,000 federal buildings, most with uninsulated glass October 12th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project