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Home > Press > Nano design, just like in nature

Abstract:
Researchers at Vienna University of Technology (TU Vienna) are currently coordinating an EU project. They are using biological principles as the inspiration to develop a new bionic fuel cell.

Nano design, just like in nature

Vienna | Posted on June 15th, 2010

Every living cell in our body can do it: covered with a thin membrane known as a cell membrane or nanomembrane, the cells can deliberately let specific substances in and out. Although it is thousands of times thinner than a human hair, this nanomembrane has an extremely complex structure and function. Three Nobel prizes have already in recent years been awarded for improving our understanding of these nanomembranes.

Biological nanomembrane has hundreds of very tinny channels which convey water, electrical charges and nutrients around and in doing so, create an equilibrium within the cell. However, we still do not know about many of the functions and structural details, but only channels which balance the water and proton exchange have been understand in depth. "These extremely fine cell membrane channels, with the ability to selectively convey protons, function in exactly the same way as fuel cells created by humans", explains Dr Werner Brenner, "only this naturally occurring process is considerably more efficient".

Fuel cells: an alternative to oil

Today, fuel cells are seen as a serious alternative to oil, which until now has been the basis for electrical energy and mobility. However, the earth's oil reserves are rapidly running out, under economic pressure to drill ever deeper into the seabed. Oil combustion also generates CO2, soot and other pollutants. In contrary, the only waste product from a fuel cell is water.

The EU project focuses on the design of the main component of every fuel cell - i.e. the membrane - with the intention of conveying protons more efficiently than in previous solutions. "It is not easy task, but it is possible. Nature has been producing these structures for billions of years and their effectiveness can be seen in every living organism. Our task is to transfer the structure of these natural nanochannels to an artificial nanomembrane, which is itself only a few hundred nanometres thick", explains Dr Jovan Matovic.

A wide range of scientific approaches are required for this project, ranging from solid state physics and nanotechnology through to chemistry. Therefore, international cooperation with six universities, research institutes and companies is also of great importance. The EU project is being coordinated by the TU Vienna research team of Dr Werner Brenner, Dr Jovan Matovic and Dr Nadja Adamovic at the Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems.

The University research team is confident: "The results of this project should have far-reaching significance for our society. If we succeed in creating the nanochannels exactly as planned, then completely different fields of application will open up, such as the accurately controlled delivery of medicine, water desalination or even new types of sensors", explains Dr Nadja Adamovic, "In this project, the boundaries between "artificial and "natural" are becoming even more blurred".

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For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Vienna University of Technology
Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems
Floragasse 7, 1040 Vienna

Dr Werner Brenner Dipl.Ing
T : +43 (1) 58801 - 366 81


Dr Jovan Matovic Dipl.Ing
T : +43 (1) 58801 - 766 67


Dr Nadja Adamovic Dipl.Ing
T : +43 (1) 58801 - 766 48


Author:
Vienna University of Technology
Public Relations Office
Bettina Neunteufl, MAS
T : +43 (1) 58801 - 41025

Copyright © Vienna University of Technology

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