Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors


Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Where nanotechnology’s future is incubating

Researchers at ASU's NanoFab facility provide expertise to help businesss and industry take advantage of the latest technologies. (Photo: Jessica Slater/ASU)
Researchers at ASU's NanoFab facility provide expertise to help businesss and industry take advantage of the latest technologies. (Photo: Jessica Slater/ASU)

Abstract:
ASU's NanoFab facility is teaching industry ways to manufacture better products and helping engineers and scientists develop new technologies

Where nanotechnology’s future is incubating

Phoenix, AZ | Posted on May 13th, 2010

Exclamations about the explosive potential of engineering materials at the nanometer scale are sounding ever more incredible.

Many are trying to accomplish feats of intricate architecture at the atomic and molecular levels that open possibilities for mind-boggling technological capabilities.

At the same, engineers are steadfastly focusing on nuts-and-bolts nanotechnology, laying groundwork for industry innovation and economic development.

It's in this work that nanotechnology is finding the most practical applications and having the most widespread impact.

In the Southwest United States, a leading hub of these endeavors is the NanoFab (Fab as in "fabrication") laboratory at Arizona State University.

Nano networking

Managed by the Center for Solid State Electronics Research in ASU's Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, the lab is part of the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network.

Supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the network - with laboratories at 14 major universities - is a leading force in the nation's effort to maintain technological and economic competitiveness.

Facilities at Harvard, Stanford, Cornell, the University of Texas, Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of Washington are among the network's centers.

"The NSF realizes how critical nanotechnology development is to the nation's progress and to stimulating the economy," says Trevor Thornton, a professor in ASU's School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering and director of the Center for Solid State Electronics Research.

"We are providing the expertise and the tools for researchers, industries and entrepreneurs to transform ideas into reality," Thornton says. The NanoFab facility is "the workshop where tangible progress in nanotechnology is incubating."

Technical expertise

For the past seven years, NanoFab has been open to small businesses, large companies and researchers with industry, state and federal government labs and other major universities throughout the Southwest, as well as some users from Europe, Mexico, Florida and the northeastern United States.

They benefit from the expertise ASU researchers offer in areas of engineering critical to developing new and improved technologies, products and services.

"We provide general knowledge about nanotechnology, but we also have kinds of expertise that you can't find in most places," Thornton says.

Driving innovation

One focus is on interfacing - or bonding - of biological materials and inorganic materials, including the interfaces between biological systems and semiconductor materials.

NanoFab's customers can benefit from work by ASU engineering researchers Nongjian Tao and Erica Forzani, who are binding proteins and polymers, creating mechanical systems that work with biological and chemical components.

Similarly, scientists in the Center for EcoGenomics in ASU's Biodesign Institute are using the NanoFab capabilities to fabricate sensor arrays that monitor the metabolic processes in individual cells.

"It would be amazing," Thornton says. "You would have the data-crunching ability of a microprocessor combined with the biological capabilities of a living cell."

Assistant research professor Shalini Prasad is among ASU experts in "bio-MEMS," the integration of biological matter with micro-electro-mechanical systems that is proving useful to advances in many areas of science.

All of this research is essential to developing the next generations of technologies in communications, computers, health care and manufacturing, among other fields.

"We have an environment that sparks collaboration between engineers, biologists, chemists and physicists," Thornton says. "These interactions are driving innovation."

Tools of discovery

NanoFab also is providing a distinctive teaching environment "that is going to help get students excited about what can be accomplished in this field," Thornton says.

Today the tools needed for scientific and technological advancement are more sophisticated than ever - and usually too expensive for small businesses and startup ventures to purchase.

That's why some of these enterprises practically take up short-term residence at NanoFab. The ASU researchers educate businesses about what technology they need to pursue their goals, and train clients how to use the laboratory facilities effectively.

"If you want to know how to make something at the nanoscale, this is the place you come to," Thornton says.

Powerhouse potential

NanoFab process development manager Timothy Eschrich, for instance, "can look at a general idea of something an entrepreneur wants to make, and develop the process to make it," Thornton says.

More than that, he adds, "We anticipate needs for the future. A big part of our expertise is being able to foresee what new kinds of tools will be needed to take the next steps beyond what we are now doing."

With the NSF's decision to extend its support of the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network through 2014, the ASU facility was recently able to obtain three new pieces of research and manufacturing equipment.

When prospective users visit NanoFab, "they are always amazed by the state-of-the-art facilities we have," Thornton says. With new additions to the laboratories, "people will see what a nanotechnology engineering powerhouse we are capable of becoming."

For more information, see the NanoFab website and the Center for Solid State Electronics Research website at www.fulton.asu.edu/fulton/csser/

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Joe Kullman

(480) 965-8122
Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering

Copyright © Arizona State University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Synthesized microporous 3-D graphene-like carbons: IBS research team create carbon synthesis using zeolites as a template July 1st, 2016

A drop of water as a model for the interplay of adhesion and stiction June 30th, 2016

No need in supercomputers: Russian scientists suggest a PC to solve complex problems tens of times faster than with massive supercomputers June 30th, 2016

Surprising qualities of insulator ring surfaces: Surface phenomena in ring-shaped topological insulators are just as controllable as those in spheres made of the same material June 30th, 2016

Laboratories

Titan shines light on high-temperature superconductor pathway: Simulation demonstrates how superconductivity arises in cuprates' pseudogap phase June 22nd, 2016

Discovery of gold nanocluster 'double' hints at other shape-changing particles: New analysis approach brings two unique atomic structures into focus June 19th, 2016

Efficient hydrogen production made easy: Sticking electrons to a semiconductor with hydrazine creates an electrocatalyst June 17th, 2016

Discovery of gold nanocluster 'double' hints at other shape changing particles: New analysis approach brings two unique atomic structures into focus June 15th, 2016

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

A drop of water as a model for the interplay of adhesion and stiction June 30th, 2016

How cancer cells spread and squeeze through tiny blood vessels (video) June 30th, 2016

Nanoscientists develop the 'ultimate discovery tool': Rapid discovery power is similar to what gene chips offer biology June 25th, 2016

Ultrathin, flat lens resolves chirality and color: Multifunctional lens could replace bulky, expensive machines June 25th, 2016

Academic/Education

JPK’s NanoWizard® AFM and ForceRobot® systems are being used in the field of medical diagnostics in the Supersensitive Molecular Layer Laboratory of POSTECH in Korea June 21st, 2016

Weizmann Institute of Science Presents: Weizmann Wonder Wander - 4G - is Online June 21st, 2016

NanoLabNL boosts quality of research facilities as Dutch Toekomstfonds invests firmly June 10th, 2016

The Institute for Transfusion Medicine at the University Hospital of Duisburg-Essen in Germany uses the ZetaView from Particle Metrix to quantify extracellular vesicles June 7th, 2016

MEMS

New research unveils graphene 'moth eyes' to power future smart technologies: New ultra-thin, patterned graphene sheets will be essential in designing future technologies such as 'smart wallpaper' and Internet-of-things applications March 1st, 2016

Vesper Collaborates with GLOBALFOUNDRIES to Deliver First Piezoelectric MEMS Microphones: Acoustic sensing company works with top foundry to support mass-market consumer products January 21st, 2016

MEMS & Sensors Industry Group Previews “Internet of MEMS & Sensors” at CES 2016 -- Global industry association invites CE OEMS/integrators to conference track on January 7 January 6th, 2016

SITRI and Accelink Announce Cooperative Agreement on Opto-Electronic Communication December 31st, 2015

Nanomedicine

A drop of water as a model for the interplay of adhesion and stiction June 30th, 2016

How cancer cells spread and squeeze through tiny blood vessels (video) June 30th, 2016

Building a smart cardiac patch: 'Bionic' cardiac patch could one day monitor and respond to cardiac problems June 28th, 2016

Nanoscientists develop the 'ultimate discovery tool': Rapid discovery power is similar to what gene chips offer biology June 25th, 2016

Sensors

Researchers discover new chemical sensing technique: Technique allows sharper detail -- and more information -- with near infrared light June 24th, 2016

Artificial synapse rivals biological ones in energy consumption June 21st, 2016

A new form of hybrid photodetectors with quantum dots and graphene June 19th, 2016

Drum beats from a one atom thick graphite membrane June 15th, 2016

Nanoelectronics

Soft decoupling of organic molecules on metal June 23rd, 2016

Tailored DNA shifts electrons into the 'fast lane': DNA nanowire improved by altering sequences June 22nd, 2016

Scientists engineer tunable DNA for electronics applications June 21st, 2016

Novel energy inside a microcircuit chip: VTT developed an efficient nanomaterial-based integrated energy June 10th, 2016

Announcements

Synthesized microporous 3-D graphene-like carbons: IBS research team create carbon synthesis using zeolites as a template July 1st, 2016

A drop of water as a model for the interplay of adhesion and stiction June 30th, 2016

No need in supercomputers: Russian scientists suggest a PC to solve complex problems tens of times faster than with massive supercomputers June 30th, 2016

Surprising qualities of insulator ring surfaces: Surface phenomena in ring-shaped topological insulators are just as controllable as those in spheres made of the same material June 30th, 2016

Tools

How cancer cells spread and squeeze through tiny blood vessels (video) June 30th, 2016

Oxford Instruments and Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory collaborate to develop HTS magnet technology components for high field superconducting magnet systems June 29th, 2016

Texas A&M Chemist Says Trapped Electrons To Blame For Lack Of Battery Efficiency: Forget mousetraps — today’s scientists will get the cheese if they manage to build a better battery June 28th, 2016

FEI Launches Helios G4 DualBeam Series for Materials Science: The Helios G4 DualBeam Series features new capabilities to enable scientists and engineers to answer the most demanding and challenging scientific questions June 27th, 2016

Nanobiotechnology

A drop of water as a model for the interplay of adhesion and stiction June 30th, 2016

How cancer cells spread and squeeze through tiny blood vessels (video) June 30th, 2016

Building a smart cardiac patch: 'Bionic' cardiac patch could one day monitor and respond to cardiac problems June 28th, 2016

Nanotechnology and math deliver two-in-one punch for cancer therapy resistance June 24th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







Car Brands
Buy website traffic