Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Nanodots Breakthrough May Lead To A Library On One Chip

Abstract:
A researcher at North Carolina State University has developed a computer chip that can store an unprecedented amount of data - enough to hold an entire library's worth of information on a single chip.

By Matt Shipman

Nanodots Breakthrough May Lead To A Library On One Chip

Raleigh, NC | Posted on April 28th, 2010

The new chip stems from a breakthrough in the use of nanodots, or nanoscale magnets, and represents a significant advance in computer-memory technology.

"We have created magnetic nanodots that store one bit of information on each nanodot, allowing us to store over one billion pages of information in a chip that is one square inch," says Dr. Jay Narayan, the John C. Fan Distinguished Chair Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at NC State and author of the research.

The breakthrough is that these nanodots are made of single, defect-free crystals, creating magnetic sensors that are integrated directly into a silicon electronic chip. These nanodots, which can be made uniformly as small as six nanometers in diameter, are all precisely oriented in the same way - allowing programmers to reliably read and write data to the chips.

The chips themselves can be manufactured cost-effectively, but the next step is to develop magnetic packaging that will enable users to take advantage of the chips - using something, such as laser technology, that can effectively interact with the nanodots.

The research, which was funded by the National Science Foundation, was presented as an invited talk April 7 at the 2011 Materials Research Society Spring Meeting in San Francisco.

NC State's Department of Materials Science and Engineering is part of the university's College of Engineering.

Note to editors: The study abstract follows.

"Self Assembly of epitaxial magnetic nanostructures"

Author: J. Narayan, North Carolina State University

Presented: April 7, 2010, 2011 MRS Spring Meeting, San Francisco

Abstract: This talk focuses on self-assembly processing of magnetic nanodots such as Ni, Ni-Pt, Fe-Pt during thin film growth by pulsed laser deposition. This self-assembly can be extended from two-dimensional to three-dimensional structures by controlling stresses/strains in the layers of composite structures. Magnetic properties are found to be a strong function of size, shape, orientation and chemical ordering. The primary focus of this talk is on epitaxial orientation of nanodots and integration of microelectronic/nanoelectronic devices on Si(100)(1). The epitaxial orientation is controlled by TiN buffer layer grown epitaxially on Si(100), and results compared with randomly oriented nanodots formed using amorphous alumina buffer. The epitaxial structures (Ni, Ni-Pt, Fe-Pt)/TiN/Si(100) involve lattice misfit ranging from 8% to 22%, which can be handled by our domain epitaxy paradigm (2). The DME paradigm involves matching of integral multiples of lattice planes across the interface, as the strain relaxation occurs by dislocations which represent either missing or extra planes (2). We discuss the optimization of structure and atomic ordering in Ni-Pt and FePt structures and correlations with magnetic properties by controlling thin film processing parameters and annealing conditions.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Matt Shipman
News Services
919.515.6386

Dr. Jay Narayan
919.515.7874

Copyright © North Carolina State University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Shining rings: A new material emits white light when exposed to electricity: New synthetic approach could spark development of other dynamic materials July 24th, 2017

Ultrathin device harvests electricity from human motion July 23rd, 2017

The July 23 close fly-by of asteroid 2017 BS5 is explored in a Q&A with Dr. John S. Lewis, chief scientist at Deep Space Industries July 23rd, 2017

Scientists announce the quest for high-index materials: All-dielectric nanophotonics: The quest for better materials and fabrication techniques July 22nd, 2017

Possible Futures

Shining rings: A new material emits white light when exposed to electricity: New synthetic approach could spark development of other dynamic materials July 24th, 2017

Ultrathin device harvests electricity from human motion July 23rd, 2017

The July 23 close fly-by of asteroid 2017 BS5 is explored in a Q&A with Dr. John S. Lewis, chief scientist at Deep Space Industries July 23rd, 2017

Scientists announce the quest for high-index materials: All-dielectric nanophotonics: The quest for better materials and fabrication techniques July 22nd, 2017

Academic/Education

The Physics Department of Imperial College, London, uses the Quorum Q150T to deposit metals and ITO to make plasmonic sensors and electric contact pads July 13th, 2017

Oxford Instruments congratulates Lancaster University for inaugurating the IsoLab, built for studying quantum systems June 20th, 2017

The 2017 Winners for Generation Nano June 8th, 2017

MIT Energy Initiative awards 10 seed fund grants for early-stage energy research May 4th, 2017

Chip Technology

Semiliquid chains pulled out of a sea of microparticles July 20th, 2017

A firefly's flash inspires new nanolaser light July 18th, 2017

GLOBALFOUNDRIES and VeriSilicon To Enable Single-Chip Solution for Next-Gen IoT Networks: Integrated solution leverages GFs 22FDX technology to decrease power, area, and cost for NB-IoT and LTE-M applications July 14th, 2017

Nanometrics to Announce Second Quarter Financial Results on August 1, 2017 July 14th, 2017

Quantum Computing

Into the quantum world with a tennis racket: Classical mechanics helps control quantum computers July 6th, 2017

Microsoft, Purdue collaborate to advance quantum computing May 30th, 2017

Looking for the quantum frontier: Beyond classical computing without fault-tolerance? April 27th, 2017

Harris & Harris Group Issues Its Financial Statements as of December 31, 2016, Posts Its Annual Shareholder Letter, And Will Host a Conference Call for Shareholders on Friday, March 17, 2017 March 15th, 2017

Nanoelectronics

Tokyo Institute of Technology research: Antiaromatic molecule displays record electrical conductance July 19th, 2017

A firefly's flash inspires new nanolaser light July 18th, 2017

GLOBALFOUNDRIES and VeriSilicon To Enable Single-Chip Solution for Next-Gen IoT Networks: Integrated solution leverages GFs 22FDX technology to decrease power, area, and cost for NB-IoT and LTE-M applications July 14th, 2017

Thinking thin brings new layering and thermal abilities to the semiconductor industry: In a breakthrough for the semiconductor industry, researchers demonstrate a new layer transfer technique called "controlled spalling" that creates many thin layers from a single gallium nitride July 11th, 2017

Announcements

Shining rings: A new material emits white light when exposed to electricity: New synthetic approach could spark development of other dynamic materials July 24th, 2017

Ultrathin device harvests electricity from human motion July 23rd, 2017

The July 23 close fly-by of asteroid 2017 BS5 is explored in a Q&A with Dr. John S. Lewis, chief scientist at Deep Space Industries July 23rd, 2017

Scientists announce the quest for high-index materials: All-dielectric nanophotonics: The quest for better materials and fabrication techniques July 22nd, 2017

Quantum Dots/Rods

Coupling a nano-trumpet with a quantum dot enables precise position determination July 14th, 2017

Graphene and quantum dots put in motion a CMOS-integrated camera that can see the invisible May 29th, 2017

The brighter side of twisted polymers: Conjugated polymers designed with a twist produce tiny, brightly fluorescent particles with broad applications May 16th, 2017

Nanoparticles open new window for biological imaging: Quantum dots that emit infrared light enable highly detailed images of internal body structures April 10th, 2017

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project