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Home > Press > Paper Describes Functional Nanomaterials For Medical, Health Devices

Atomic layer deposition is especially useful for coating complex nanoscale structures. This image is a scanning electron micrograph obtained from a zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membrane.
Atomic layer deposition is especially useful for coating complex nanoscale structures. This image is a scanning electron micrograph obtained from a zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membrane.

Abstract:
A team led by researchers from North Carolina State University has published a paper that describes the use of a technique called atomic layer deposition to incorporate "biological functionality" into complex nanomaterials, which could lead to a new generation of medical and environmental health applications. For example, the researchers show how the technology can be used to develop effective, low-cost water purification devices that could be used in developing countries.

By Matt Shipman

Paper Describes Functional Nanomaterials For Medical, Health Devices

Raleigh, NC | Posted on March 22nd, 2010

"Atomic layer deposition is a technique that can be used to create thin films for coating metals or ceramics, and is especially useful for coating complex nanoscale structures," says Dr. Roger Narayan, the paper's lead author. "This paper shows how atomic layer deposition can be used to create biologically functional materials, such as materials that have antibacterial properties. Another example would be a material that does not bond to proteins in the body, which could be used for implantable medical sensors." Narayan is a professor in the joint biomedical engineering department of NC State's College of Engineering and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

One of the applications discussed in the paper is a material that could be used as a filter for point-of-use water purification. "This would be very helpful in the developing world, or in disaster situations - like Haiti - where people do not have access to safe water," Narayan says. "Over one billion people do not have access to safe water. This can lead to a variety of public health problems, including cholera and hepatitis."

Specifically, the researchers show that atomic layer deposition can be used to create a film for coating nanoporous membranes, which may be used for filtering out pathogenic bacteria. "The film could also provide antimicrobial functionality," Narayan says, "to neutralize bacteria."

In the study, the researchers found that membranes treated with one of these films were able to neutralize two common pathogens: E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The researchers are currently working with colleagues to assess how well the membranes perform against a variety of environmental bacteria. It's anticipated that these membranes could find use in a variety of medical and environmental health applications, such as hemodialysis filters and implantable sensors.

The research, "Atomic layer deposition-based functionalization of materials for medical and environmental health applications," is published in the March issue of the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A. The research was funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health. The research was co-authored by Narayan, Dr. Nancy Monteiro-Riviere, professor of investigative dermatology and toxicology at the Center for Chemical Toxicology Research and Pharmacokinetics at NC State, Dr. Chunming Jin, a post-doctoral research associate at NC State, and Dr. Junping Zhang, a former post-doctoral research associate at NC State. Additional co-authors were from Kodak Research Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, North Dakota State University, National Yang-Ming University in Taiwan, and Taipei Medical University in Taiwan.

Note to editors: The study abstract follows.

"Atomic layer deposition-based functionalization of materials for medical and environmental health applications"

Authors: Roger J. Narayan, Nancy A. Monteiro-Riviere, Chunming Jin and Junping Zhang, North Carolina State University, et al.

Published: March 2010, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A

Abstract: Nanoporous alumina membranes exhibit high pore densities, well-controlled pore sizes, uniform pore sizes and straight pores. Owing to these unusual properties, nanoporous alumina membranes are currently being considered for use in implantable sensor membranes and water purification membranes. Atomic layer deposition is a thin-film growth process that may be used to modify the pore size in a nanoporous alumina membrane while retaining a narrow pore distribution. In addition, films deposited by means of atomic layer deposition may impart improved biological functionality to nanoporous alumina membranes. In this study, zinc oxide coatings and platinum coatings were deposited on nanoporous alumina membranes by means of atomic layer deposition. PEGylated nanoporous alumina membranes were prepared by self-assembly of 1-mercaptoundec-11-yl hexa(ethylene glycol) on platinum-coated nanoporous alumina membranes. The pores of the PEGylated nanoporous alumina membranes remained free of fouling after exposure to human platelet-rich plasma; protein adsorption, fibrin networks and platelet aggregation were not observed on the coated membrane surface. Zinc oxide-coated nanoporous alumina membranes demonstrated activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The results of this work indicate that nanoporous alumina membranes may be modified using atomic layer deposition for use in a variety of medical and environmental health applications.

####

About North Carolina State University
With more than 31,000 students and nearly 8,000 faculty and staff, North Carolina State University is a comprehensive university known for its leadership in education and research, and globally recognized for its science, technology, engineering and mathematics leadership.

NC State students, faculty and staff are focused. As one of the leading land-grant institutions in the nation, NC State is committed to playing an active and vital role in improving the quality of life for the citizens of North Carolina, the nation and the world.

How? Researchers across the university and Centennial Campus are deeply engaged in making new, application-driven discoveries. As a major research university, NC State has the people —from undergraduate and graduate students to faculty — and the responsibility to advance knowledge, transfer technology, and discover and develop innovations that solve some of the world’s most pressing problems.

And we are. NC State’s research expenditures are approaching more than $325 million annually, with almost 70 percent of faculty engaged in sponsored research and 2,500 graduate students supported by research grants. NC State is ranked third among all public universities (without medical schools) in industry-sponsored research expenditures.

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Contacts:
Matt Shipman
News Services
919.515.6386

Dr. Roger Narayan
919.696.8488

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