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Home > News > AMAG Anemia Drug Eyes Growing Market

March 8th, 2010

AMAG Anemia Drug Eyes Growing Market

Abstract:
Most biotech firms bet their future on only one drug. AMAG Pharmaceuticals (AMAG) is no exception.

The company relies heavily on Feraheme, a new IV injection treatment for iron-deficiency anemia in adult patients with chronic kidney disease.

People with chronic kidney diseases often suffer from iron-deficiency anemia. Without enough iron, the body can't produce enough hemoglobin in red blood cells. That makes people tired and pale because of a lack of oxygen in blood cells carried throughout the body.

Feraheme can be injected into a patient in 17 seconds, while conventional IV iron treatment takes 15 to 60 minutes for infusion, AMAG says. Also, Feraheme requires twice-a-week injections while other IV irons need up to 10 treatments a month.

The drug is a product of nanotechnology. It uses tiny nano-particles of iron oxide, which makes quick injection possible. The Food and Drug Administration approved it in June.

Source:
investors.com

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