Nanotechnology Now







Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Detecting the Undetectable in Prostate Cancer Testing

Abstract:
A team of Northwestern University researchers, using an extremely sensitive nanotechnology-based tool known as the biobarcode system, has detected previously undetectable levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in patients who have undergone radical prostatectomy. This new assay, just one of many being developed by investigators at the Nanomaterials for Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutics Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (Northwestern CCNE), is 300 times more sensitive than commercially available PSA tests.

Detecting the Undetectable in Prostate Cancer Testing

Bethesda, MD | Posted on November 18th, 2009

The ability to easily and quickly detect very low levels of PSA may enable doctors to diagnose men with prostate cancer recurrence years earlier than is currently possible. Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death for men in the United States. (Only lung cancer is more deadly.) "We have defined a new zero for PSA," said Chad Mirkin, Ph.D., principal investigator of the Northwestern CCNE. "This level of sensitivity in detecting low concentrations of PSA will take the blinders off the medical community, especially when it comes to tracking residual disease." This study, which was led by Mirkin and C. Shad Thaxton, M.D., appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

"This new PSA assay may alter the management of patients who have been treated with surgery for prostate cancer," said William J. Catalona, M.D., director of the Clinical Prostate Cancer Program at Northwestern's Lurie Cancer Center. He was the first to demonstrate that the PSA test, a simple blood test, could be used as a screening tool for prostate cancer. "Studies have shown that postoperative radiation therapy given early to patients with adverse pathology, called adjuvant radiation, reduces the recurrence rate and improves survival," Catalona said. After the removal of the prostate gland, patients typically have PSA levels that are undetectable when measured using conventional diagnostic tools. "Because the 'nano-PSA assay' is more sensitive than the current commercially available PSA tests, it may allow physicians to target adjuvant radiation for patients destined to have a life-threatening tumor recurrence."

The study is an early indicator of how nanotechnology can be used to improve medical diagnostics and early cancer detection. In the case of prostate cancer recurrence following primary surgical treatment, patients with detectable but non-rising PSA levels could be reassured that their cancer will not recur. This reassurance potentially could be delivered much earlier than with conventional diagnostic tools. For patients with increasing levels of PSA, detected before conventional tools are able, doctors could diagnose a recurrence and intervene accordingly.

Furthermore, the effectiveness of post-operative treatment could be assessed by monitoring a patient's PSA levels. Tracking PSA levels early, before conventional tools are able, may allow doctors to validate treatments for recurrent cancer, such as radiation, hormone therapies and chemotherapies. The most effective will be able to keep down PSA levels.

"The first route to a new therapeutic is a good diagnostic tool, and that's what we have here," said Mirkin. "This bio-barcode assay, or a variant of it, could be a commercial tool in as little as 18 months. The technology is there. Now it's a business decision."

PSA is a protein produced by the cells of the prostate gland and found in the bloodstream. This pilot study looked at serum samples from 18 post-prostatectomy patients collected over the course of a number of years.

The researchers were able to reliably and accurately quantify PSA values at less than 0.1 nanograms per milliliter, the clinical limit of detection for commercial assays. The lower limit of detection for PSA using the bio-barcode assay is approximately 300 times lower than the lower limit of detection for commercial tests. The PSA measurements were used to classify the patients as either having no evidence of disease or having a relapse of disease. The Northwestern team is now conducting a similar retrospective study of 260 patients and eventually plans to do a large prospective study.

The ultra-sensitive technology is based on gold nanoparticle probes decorated with DNA and antibodies that can recognize and bind to PSA when present at extremely low levels in a blood sample. A magnetic microparticle, outfitted with a second antibody for PSA, also is used in the assay. When in solution, the antibody-functionalized particles "recognize" and bind to PSA, sandwiching the protein between the two particles.

The key is that attached to each tiny gold nanoparticle are hundreds of identical strands of DNA. Mirkin calls this "bar-code DNA" because they have designed it as a label specific to the PSA target. After the "particle-protein-particle" sandwich is removed magnetically from solution, the DNA is removed from the sandwich and read using a Verigene® ID system, a nanotechnology platform designed to detect and quantify DNA. The amount of PSA present is calculated based on the amount of bar-code DNA. For each molecule of captured PSA, hundreds of DNA strands are released, which is one of the ways the PSA signal is amplified.

This work, which is detailed in a paper titled, "Nanoparticle-based bio-barcode assay redefines 'undetectable' PSA and biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy," was supported by the NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer, a comprehensive initiative designed to accelerate the application of nanotechnology to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer. Investigators from the Innsbruck Medical University in Austria also participated in this study. An abstract of this paper is available at the journal's Web site.

####

About NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer
To help meet the goal of reducing the burden of cancer, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, is engaged in efforts to harness the power of nanotechnology to radically change the way we diagnose, treat and prevent cancer.

The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer is a comprehensive, systematized initiative encompassing the public and private sectors, designed to accelerate the application of the best capabilities of nanotechnology to cancer.

Currently, scientists are limited in their ability to turn promising molecular discoveries into benefits for cancer patients. Nanotechnology can provide the technical power and tools that will enable those developing new diagnostics, therapeutics, and preventives to keep pace with today’s explosion in knowledge.

For more information, please click here

Copyright © NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

onic Present breakthrough in CMOS-based Transceivers for mm-Wave Radar Systems March 1st, 2015

Graphene Shows Promise In Eradication Of Stem Cancer Cells March 1st, 2015

Novel Method to Determine Optical Purity of Drug Components March 1st, 2015

Scientific breakthrough in rechargeable batteries: Researchers from Singapore and Québec Team Up to Develop Next-Generation Materials to Power Electronic Devices and Electric Vehicles February 28th, 2015

Possible Futures

European roadmap for graphene science and technology published February 25th, 2015

Quantum research past, present and future for discussion at AAAS February 16th, 2015

World’s first compact rotary 3D printer-cum-scanner unveiled at AAAS by NTU Singapore start-up: With production funded by crowdsourcing, the first unit will be delivered to the United States in March February 16th, 2015

Nanotechnology Electric Vehicle (EV) Market Analysis Report 2015: According to Radiant Insights, Inc February 13th, 2015

Nanomedicine

Graphene Shows Promise In Eradication Of Stem Cancer Cells March 1st, 2015

Novel Method to Determine Optical Purity of Drug Components March 1st, 2015

Untangling DNA with a droplet of water, a pipet and a polymer: With the 'rolling droplet technique,' a DNA-injected water droplet rolls like a ball over a platelet, sticking the DNA to the plate surface February 27th, 2015

Graphene shows potential as novel anti-cancer therapeutic strategy: University of Manchester scientists have used graphene to target and neutralise cancer stem cells while not harming other cells February 26th, 2015

Sensors

Penn researchers develop new technique for making molybdenum disulfide: Extra control over monolayer material with advantages over graphene February 19th, 2015

Researchers build atomically thin gas and chemical sensors: Sensors made of molybdenum disulfide are small, thin and have a high level of selectivity when detecting gases and chemicals February 19th, 2015

Production of Biosensor in Iran to Detect Oxalic Acid February 18th, 2015

Improved fire detection with new ultra-sensitive, ultraviolet light sensor February 17th, 2015

Announcements

onic Present breakthrough in CMOS-based Transceivers for mm-Wave Radar Systems March 1st, 2015

Graphene Shows Promise In Eradication Of Stem Cancer Cells March 1st, 2015

Novel Method to Determine Optical Purity of Drug Components March 1st, 2015

Scientific breakthrough in rechargeable batteries: Researchers from Singapore and Québec Team Up to Develop Next-Generation Materials to Power Electronic Devices and Electric Vehicles February 28th, 2015

Nanobiotechnology

Untangling DNA with a droplet of water, a pipet and a polymer: With the 'rolling droplet technique,' a DNA-injected water droplet rolls like a ball over a platelet, sticking the DNA to the plate surface February 27th, 2015

Bacteria network for food: Bacteria connect to each other and exchange nutrients February 23rd, 2015

Building tailor-made DNA nanotubes step by step: New, block-by-block assembly method could pave way for applications in opto-electronics, drug delivery February 23rd, 2015

Better batteries inspired by lowly snail shells: Biological molecules can latch onto nanoscale components and lock them into position to make high performing Li-ion battery electrodes, according to new research presented at the 59th annual meeting of the Biophysical Society February 12th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2015 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE