Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors



Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


android tablet pc

Home > Press > Clemson carbon nanotube research part of $3 million award to enhance energy efficiency

 Dr. Apparao Rao and graduate student Jason Reppert assess the outcome of a nanotube synthesis procedure.  image by: Clemson University
Dr. Apparao Rao and graduate student Jason Reppert assess the outcome of a nanotube synthesis procedure.
image by: Clemson University

Abstract:
Clemson University is part of a five-year $3 million Air Force Office of Scientific Research award, along with the University of Texas at Dallas and Yale University, to search for nanoscale materials that superconduct to allow for efficient flow of a current.

Clemson carbon nanotube research part of $3 million award to enhance energy efficiency

Clemson, SC | Posted on November 10th, 2009

Specifically, the team will explore carbon nanotube-based superconductors to develop composite wires that may eventually be used, among other things, to replace inefficient copper wiring in power lines that presently can lose up to a third of their energy as heat.

"In the superconducting state, the flow of charges does not experience resistance, so the current flow is very efficient," said Clemson University physics professor Apparao Rao. "The holy grail is to get these charges to move with similar efficiency at room temperature instead of at extremely cool temperatures."

At Clemson, Rao has used pulsed lasers to produce superconducting nanotubes that are thousands of times smaller than a strand of hair, also referred to as low-dimensional materials. The process developed in his labs yields carbon nanotubes that are doped with elemental boron, which enables the nanotubes to superconduct at low temperatures.

"We are very excited about this discovery since superconducting nanotubes are not only useful in several applications but also serve as an ideal candidate to explore the underpinning physics in low-dimensional materials, which has long been a challenge," said Rao. "Clemson's role in this research is to build on this success and experiment with nanotubes doped with other elements such as sulfur, nitrogen and phosphorous with a view toward fabricating doped nanotubes that superconduct without having to cool them to very low temperatures, which is the technology used today."

In partnership with UT Dallas and Yale, Rao says the bigger question to be addressed is the incorporation of Clemson's doped nanotubes into high-strength, lightweight superconducting wires for such uses as medical MRI imaging, efficient power lines and other Air Force applications.

NOTE: Air Force Office of Scientific Research award grant number FA9550 - 09 - 1 - 0384.

####

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
* Apparao Rao
*
* 864-656-2063

* Susan Polowczuk
Media Relations
*
* 864-656-2063

Copyright © Clemson University

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

New non-invasive method can detect Alzheimer's disease early: MRI probe technology shows brain toxins in living animals for first time December 22nd, 2014

Piezoelectricity in a 2-D semiconductor: Berkeley Lab researchers discovery of piezoelectricty in molybdenum disulfide holds promise for future MEMS December 22nd, 2014

Quantum physics just got less complicated December 22nd, 2014

Enzyme Biosensor Used for Rapid Measurement of Drug December 22nd, 2014

Govt.-Legislation/Regulation/Funding/Policy

Mysteries of ‘Molecular Machines’ Revealed: Phenix software uses X-ray diffraction spots to produce 3-D image December 22nd, 2014

Piezoelectricity in a 2-D semiconductor: Berkeley Lab researchers discovery of piezoelectricty in molybdenum disulfide holds promise for future MEMS December 22nd, 2014

Atom-thick CCD could capture images: Rice University scientists develop two-dimensional, light-sensitive material December 20th, 2014

Oregon researchers glimpse pathway of sunlight to electricity: Collaboration with Lund University uses modified UO spectroscopy equipment to study 'maze' of connections in photoactive quantum dots December 19th, 2014

Nanotubes/Buckyballs

A sponge-like molecular cage for purification of fullerenes December 15th, 2014

'Trojan horse' proteins used to target hard-to-reach cancers: Scientists at Brunel University London have found a way of targeting hard-to-reach cancers and degenerative diseases using nanoparticles, but without causing the damaging side effects the treatment normally brings December 11th, 2014

Detecting gases wirelessly and cheaply: New sensor can transmit information on hazardous chemicals or food spoilage to a smartphone December 8th, 2014

Green meets nano: Scientists at TU Darmstadt create multifunctional nanotubes using nontoxic materials December 3rd, 2014

Announcements

New non-invasive method can detect Alzheimer's disease early: MRI probe technology shows brain toxins in living animals for first time December 22nd, 2014

Piezoelectricity in a 2-D semiconductor: Berkeley Lab researchers discovery of piezoelectricty in molybdenum disulfide holds promise for future MEMS December 22nd, 2014

Quantum physics just got less complicated December 22nd, 2014

Enzyme Biosensor Used for Rapid Measurement of Drug December 22nd, 2014

Energy

Oregon researchers glimpse pathway of sunlight to electricity: Collaboration with Lund University uses modified UO spectroscopy equipment to study 'maze' of connections in photoactive quantum dots December 19th, 2014

How does enzymatic pretreatment affect the nanostructure and reaction space of lignocellulosic biomass? December 18th, 2014

Iranian Scientists Use Nanotechnology to Increase Power, Energy of Supercapacitors December 18th, 2014

Lifeboat Foundation gives 2014 Guardian Award to Elon Musk December 16th, 2014

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project







© Copyright 1999-2014 7th Wave, Inc. All Rights Reserved PRIVACY POLICY :: CONTACT US :: STATS :: SITE MAP :: ADVERTISE