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Home > News > Scientists Build Nanostructures out of Single DNA Strands

September 14th, 2009

Scientists Build Nanostructures out of Single DNA Strands

Abstract:
With its unique double-helical structure, DNA has the ability to be used as a programmable building material to construct designer nanoscale architectures. Complex DNA architectures could have a variety of applications, from DNA-based nanomotors to biosensing and drug delivery. Taking the research a step forward, researchers have recently constructed a nanometer-sized tetrahedron from a single strand of DNA, using a method that could have advantages for assembling similar structures on a large scale.

Source:
physorg.com

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