Nanotechnology Now





Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button


DHgate

Home > Press > Kavli Laureate Sumio Iijima at British Science Festival

Louis Brus and Sumio Iijima received the Kavli Prize in nanoscience at an award ceremony in Oslo, Noway in September 2008. In the middle Fred Kavli who initiated the prize. Photo: Håkon Mosvold Larsen/Scanpix
Louis Brus and Sumio Iijima received the Kavli Prize in nanoscience at an award ceremony in Oslo, Noway in September 2008. In the middle Fred Kavli who initiated the prize. Photo: Håkon Mosvold Larsen/Scanpix

Abstract:
Sumio Iijima who shared the first Kavli Prize in nanoscience with Louis E. Brus in 2008, will be appearing at the British Science Festival on the 7th of September. Iijima of Meijo University in Japan, is one of the world's leading figures at the forefront of nanotechnology research. He is widely credited for the discovery of carbon nanotubes. In his speech at the University of Surrey Iijima will talk about his work and the possibilities for the future.

Kavli Laureate Sumio Iijima at British Science Festival

UK | Posted on September 7th, 2009

Sumio Iijima studied at the University of Electro-Communications in Tokyo and completed his PhD in physics at Tohoku University, in Sendai, before moving to Arizona State University in Phoenix, Arizona. In postdoctoral research and later as a research scientist from 1970 to 1982, he worked on high-resolution electron microscopy.

Iijima revealed the first electron micrograph showing atoms in a crystal. He developed a new electron microscope that could view the structure of materials at the atomic level. In 1977 he achieved a long-term goal of electron microscopy when he was able to observe individual tungsten atoms. He carried out electron microscopy of graphite while working as a visiting scholar at Cambridge University in 1979.

Iijima moved back to Japan in 1982. He has been a Research Fellow at NEC Corporation since 1987 and published his seminal work on carbon nanotubes in 1991. Although carbon nanotubes had previously been observed, his paper generated unprecedented interest and stimulated a great deal of further research in the field.

Iijimas has been a Professor at Meijo University in Nagoya, Japan, since 1999. He has received close to three dozen awards and prizes for his research including the Asahi Award in 1996, the Agilent Technologies Europhysics Prize in 2001, and the McGroddy Materials Prize in 2002 from the American Physical Society, as well as the Benjamin Franklin Medal in Physics, also in 2002.

Kavli Prize Laurates

Louis E. Brus of Columbia University, US, and Sumio Iijima of Meijo University in Japan, shared the nanoscience prize for their respective discoveries of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, also known as quantum dots, and carbon nanotubes.

Major advances being predicted in fields as diverse as electronics, the environment, energy and bio-medicine would not have been possible without Brus and Iijima's contributions in explaining the unusual properties of particles so small that electron motion is confined to zero or one dimension.

Resources

British Science Festival
www.britishscienceassociation.org/web/BritishScienceFestival/

####

About The Kavli Foundation
Dedicated to the advancement of science for the benefit of humanity, The Kavli FoundationSM supports scientific research, honors scientific achievement, and promotes public understanding of scientists and their work. Advances in basic research in the fields of astrophysics, nanoscience, neuroscience, and theoretical physics is emphasized through an international program of research institutes, prizes, professorships, and symposia. Established in 2000 by Fred Kavli, its headquarters are in Oxnard, California.

For more information, please click here

Copyright © The Kavli Foundation

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Physicists solve quantum tunneling mystery: ANU media release: An international team of scientists studying ultrafast physics have solved a mystery of quantum mechanics, and found that quantum tunneling is an instantaneous process May 27th, 2015

Nanotechnology identifies brain tumor types through MRI 'virtual biopsy' in animal studies: If results are confirmed in humans, tumor cells could someday be diagnosed by MRI imaging and treated with tumor-specific IV injections; new NIH grant will fund future study May 27th, 2015

Who needs water to assemble DNA? Non-aqueous solvent supports DNA nanotechnology May 27th, 2015

Controlled Release of Anticorrosive Materials in Spot by Nanocarriers May 27th, 2015

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes

Basel physicists develop efficient method of signal transmission from nanocomponents May 23rd, 2015

Researchers develop new way to manufacture nanofibers May 21st, 2015

Sandia researchers first to measure thermoelectric behavior by 'Tinkertoy' materials May 20th, 2015

Cotton fibres instead of carbon nanotubes May 9th, 2015

Announcements

Physicists solve quantum tunneling mystery: ANU media release: An international team of scientists studying ultrafast physics have solved a mystery of quantum mechanics, and found that quantum tunneling is an instantaneous process May 27th, 2015

Nanotechnology identifies brain tumor types through MRI 'virtual biopsy' in animal studies: If results are confirmed in humans, tumor cells could someday be diagnosed by MRI imaging and treated with tumor-specific IV injections; new NIH grant will fund future study May 27th, 2015

Who needs water to assemble DNA? Non-aqueous solvent supports DNA nanotechnology May 27th, 2015

Controlled Release of Anticorrosive Materials in Spot by Nanocarriers May 27th, 2015

Tools

Seeing the action: UCSB researchers develop a novel device to image the minute forces and actions involved in cell membrane hemifusion May 27th, 2015

Physicists solve quantum tunneling mystery: ANU media release: An international team of scientists studying ultrafast physics have solved a mystery of quantum mechanics, and found that quantum tunneling is an instantaneous process May 27th, 2015

This Slinky lookalike 'hyperlens' helps us see tiny objects: The photonics advancement could improve early cancer detection, nanoelectronics manufacturing and scientists' ability to observe single molecules May 23rd, 2015

Nanometrics Announces Live Webcast of Upcoming Investor and Analyst Day May 20th, 2015

Events/Classes

Technology for Tomorrow’s Market Opportunities and Challenges: LetiDays Grenoble Presents the Possibilities: June 24-25 Event Includes Focus on IoT-Augmented Mobility and Leti’s Latest Results on Silicon Technologies, Sensors, Health Applications and Smart Cities May 27th, 2015

Arrowhead to Present at Jefferies 2015 Healthcare Conference May 27th, 2015

Haydale Named Lead Sponsor for Cambridge Graphene Festival May 22nd, 2015

Aspen Aerogels to Present at the Cowen and Company Technology, Media & Telecom Conference May 21st, 2015

Quantum Dots/Rods

Statement by QD Vision regarding European Parliament’s Vote on Cadmium-Based Quantum Dots May 20th, 2015

Toward 'green' paper-thin, flexible electronics May 20th, 2015

Electricity generating nano-wizards: Quantum dots are an ideal nanolab to study the means to turning heat into electricity May 18th, 2015

QD Vision to Showcase Quantum Dot “Firsts” at Display Week 2015: Executives will present, demo current and future quantum dot technology May 13th, 2015

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More










ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project