Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Teeny-tiny X-Ray Vision

Abstract:
The tubes that power X-ray machines are shrinking, improving the clarity and detail of their Superman-like vision. A team of nanomaterial scientists, medical physicists, and cancer biologists at the University of North Carolina has developed new lower-cost X-ray tubes packed with sharp-tipped carbon nanotubes for cancer research and treatment.

Teeny-tiny X-Ray Vision

University of North Carolina | Posted on August 3rd, 2009

The tubes that power X-ray machines are shrinking, improving the clarity and detail of their Superman-like vision. A team of nanomaterial scientists, medical physicists, and cancer biologists at the University of North Carolina has developed new lower-cost X-ray tubes packed with sharp-tipped carbon nanotubes for cancer research and treatment.

The tiny technology, presented at this year's meeting of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine in Anaheim, California, is being developed to image human breast tissue, laboratory animals, and cancer patients under radiotherapy treatment, and to irradiate cells with more control than previously possible with conventional X-ray tubes.

The X-ray machine used in a typical hospital today is powered by a "hot" vacuum tube that dates back to the beginning of the 20th century. Inside the tube, a tungsten metal filament -- similar to the one that creates light in an incandescent bulb -- is heated to a temperature of 1,000 degrees Celsius. The heat releases electrons, which accelerate in the X-ray tube and strike a piece of metal, the anode, creating X-rays.

Sha Chang, Otto Zhou, and colleagues that University of North Carolina have developed cold X-ray tubes that replace the tungsten filament with carbon nanotubes packed like blades of tiny grass. Electrons are instantly emitted from the sharp tips of the nanotubes when a voltage is applied. "Think of each nanotube as a lightning rod on top of a building. The high electric field at the tip of the lightning rod draws the electric current from the cloud. Carbon nanotubes emit electrons using a similar principle," said Chang.

The group used the nanotubes to build micro-sized scanners and image the interior anatomy of small laboratory animals. Existing X-ray technologies have difficulty compensating for the blur caused by the creature's breathing. Slow mechanical shutters that open and close to block and release the radiation are used to time X-ray pulses to correspond with breath, but their speed is inadequate for small animals because of the creatures' extremely fast breathing and cardiac motion. Chang and Zhou have demonstrated that their carbon nanotubes, which can be turned on and off instantaneously, are fairly easy to synch up to equipment that monitors small animal's breathing or heart rate.

The nanotube devices may also improve human cancer imaging and treatment. CT scanners currently in use check for breast cancer by swinging a single large X-ray source around the target to take a thousand pictures over the course of minutes. Using many nanotube X-ray sources lined up in an array instead, breast imaging can be done within few seconds by electronically turning on and off each of the X-ray sources without any physical motion. This fast "tomosynthesis" imaging improves patient comfort and boosts image quality by reducing motion blur. Using 25 simultaneous beams, the team produced images of growths in breast tissue at nearly twice the resolution of commercial scanners on the market.

This summer Chang's team will conduct a clinical test of a first generation nanotube-based imaging system for high-speed image-guided radiotherapy. The research image system is developed by Siemens and Xinray Inc., a joint venture between Siemens and a University of North Carolina startup company Xintech Inc.

The talk "Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Based Imaging and Irradiation Technology Development for Basic Cancer Research" will be at 10:55 a.m. on Tuesday, July 28 in Ballroom D.
See: www.aapm.org/meetings/09AM/PRAbs.asp?mid=42&aid=11909

PRESS REGISTRATION
Journalists are welcome to attend the conference free of charge. AAPM will grant complimentary registration to any full-time or freelance journalist working on assignment. The Press guidelines are posted at: www.aapm.org/meetings/09AM/VirtualPressRoom/.

If you are a reporter and would like to attend, or if you have questions about the meeting, contact Jason Bardi 858-775-4080).

RELATED LINKS
- Main Meeting Web site: www.aapm.org/meetings/09AM/.
- Search Meeting Abstracts: www.aapm.org/meetings/09AM/prsearch.asp?mid=42.
- Meeting program: www.aapm.org/meetings/09AM/MeetingProgram.asp.
- AAPM home page: www.aapm.org.
- Background article about how medical physics has revolutionized medicine:
www.newswise.com/articles/view/538208/.


####

About American Institute of Physics (AIP)
If you ever had a mammogram, ultrasound, X-ray, MRI, PET scan, or known someone treated for cancer, chances are reasonable that a medical physicist was working behind the scenes to make sure the imaging procedure was as effective as possible. Medical physicists help to develop new imaging techniques, improve existing ones, and assure the safety of radiation used in medical procedures in radiology, radiation oncology and nuclear medicine. They collaborate with radiation oncologists to design cancer treatment plans. They provide routine quality assurance and quality control on radiation equipment and procedures to ensure that cancer patients receive the prescribed dose of radiation to the correct location. They also contribute to the development of physics intensive therapeutic techniques, such as the stereotactic radiosurgery and prostate seed implants for cancer to name a few. The annual AAPM meeting is a great resource, providing guidance to physicists to implement the latest and greatest technology in a community hospital close to you.

ABOUT AAPM
The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is a scientific, educational, and professional organization of more than 6,000 medical physicists. Headquarters are located at the American Center for Physics in College Park, MD. Publications include a scientific journal ("Medical Physics"), technical reports, and symposium proceedings. See: www.aapm.org.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Jason Bardi

858-775-4080

Copyright © Newswise

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

In IEDM 2016 Keynote, Leti CEO Says ‘Hyperconnectivity’, Human-focused Research and the IOT Promise Profound, Positive Changes December 7th, 2016

Leti IEDM 2016 Paper Clarifies Correlation between Endurance, Window Margin and Retention in RRAM for First Time: Paper Presented at IEDM 2016 Offers Ways to Reconcile High-cycling Requirements and Instability at High Temperatures in Resistive RAM December 6th, 2016

Tokyo Institute of Technology research: 3D solutions to energy savings in silicon power transistors December 6th, 2016

Physicists decipher electronic properties of materials in work that may change transistors December 6th, 2016

Possible Futures

In IEDM 2016 Keynote, Leti CEO Says ‘Hyperconnectivity’, Human-focused Research and the IOT Promise Profound, Positive Changes December 7th, 2016

Physicists decipher electronic properties of materials in work that may change transistors December 6th, 2016

Fast, efficient sperm tails inspire nanobiotechnology December 5th, 2016

Construction of practical quantum computers radically simplified: Scientists invent ground-breaking new method that puts quantum computers within reach December 5th, 2016

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes

Infrared instrumentation leader secures exclusive use of Vantablack coating December 5th, 2016

Novel Electrode Structure Provides New Promise for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries December 3rd, 2016

Cutting-edge nanotechnologies are breaking into industries November 18th, 2016

Hybrid nanostructures hold hydrogen well: Rice University scientists say boron nitride-graphene hybrid may be right for next-gen green cars October 25th, 2016

Nanomedicine

Fast, efficient sperm tails inspire nanobiotechnology December 5th, 2016

Journal Nanotechnology Progress International (JONPI) Volume 6, issue 2 coming out soon! December 5th, 2016

UTSA study describes new minimally invasive device to treat cancer and other illnesses: Medicine diffusion capsule could locally treat multiple ailments and diseases over several weeks December 3rd, 2016

Nanobiotix Provides Update on Global Development of Lead Product NBTXR3: Seven clinical trials across the world: More than 2/3 of STS patients recruited in the “act.in.sarc” Phase II/III trial: Phase I/II prostate cancer trial now recruiting in the U.S. November 28th, 2016

Announcements

In IEDM 2016 Keynote, Leti CEO Says ‘Hyperconnectivity’, Human-focused Research and the IOT Promise Profound, Positive Changes December 7th, 2016

Leti IEDM 2016 Paper Clarifies Correlation between Endurance, Window Margin and Retention in RRAM for First Time: Paper Presented at IEDM 2016 Offers Ways to Reconcile High-cycling Requirements and Instability at High Temperatures in Resistive RAM December 6th, 2016

Tokyo Institute of Technology research: 3D solutions to energy savings in silicon power transistors December 6th, 2016

Physicists decipher electronic properties of materials in work that may change transistors December 6th, 2016

Tools

Deep insights from surface reactions: Researchers use Stampede supercomputer to study new chemical sensing methods, desalination and bacterial energy production December 2nd, 2016

Controlled electron pulses November 30th, 2016

Scientists shrink electron gun to matchbox size: Terahertz technology has the potential to enable new applications November 25th, 2016

News from Quorum: The Agricultural Research Service of the USDA uses a Quorum Cryo-SEM preparation system for the study of mites, ticks and other soft bodied organisms November 22nd, 2016

Nanobiotechnology

Fast, efficient sperm tails inspire nanobiotechnology December 5th, 2016

Deep insights from surface reactions: Researchers use Stampede supercomputer to study new chemical sensing methods, desalination and bacterial energy production December 2nd, 2016

Nanobiotix Provides Update on Global Development of Lead Product NBTXR3: Seven clinical trials across the world: More than 2/3 of STS patients recruited in the “act.in.sarc” Phase II/III trial: Phase I/II prostate cancer trial now recruiting in the U.S. November 28th, 2016

From champagne bubbles, dance parties and disease to new nanomaterials: Understanding nucleation of protein filaments might help with Alzheimer's Disease and type 2 Diabetes November 24th, 2016

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE




  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project