Nanotechnology Now

Our NanoNews Digest Sponsors

Heifer International

Wikipedia Affiliate Button

Home > Press > Break-through Carbon Nanotube Assembly on Polymer Surface

Abstract:
MicroDysis developed a straightforward and effective technique to entrap single-walled carbon nanotubes upright onto a polymer surface, which provides an ideal matrix for maximum detection sensitivity in (bio)chemical applications.

Break-through Carbon Nanotube Assembly on Polymer Surface

Bordentown, NJ | Posted on July 30th, 2009

MicroDysis develops and markets biomedical and environmental devices and systems that use embedded carbon nanotubes to solve a wide variety of real-world problems. The Company's patented micro-molding fabrication and nanotube assembly techniques are able to embed vertically oriented carbon nanotubes into a polymer matrix. Recently, MicroDysis demonstrated this technique to entrap single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) onto a polymer surface, such as elastomer or silicone rubber, and plastics. This approach increases the functionalized surface of a device by 10,000 times and provides an ideal matrix for attaching molecular probes and other chemically active absorbers for maximum detection sensitivity. MicroDysis further developed an 8-well strip microplate with the bottom surface entrapped SWNTs for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications.

Assembly of carbon nanotubes from as-grown randomly tangled states into well-ordered and uniform manner has attracted considerable attentions worldwide due to specific properties of the carbon nanotubes and its importance for chemical, biomedical and engineering applications. Carbon nanotubes show their superior properties for immobilizing biomolecules with a three-dimensional nano-architecture and highly dense functional groups on the surfaces. For sensors, biochips, and many other applications, the well-ordered and functionalized carbon nanotubes are greatly desirable. However, the creation of properly oriented nanotubes remains a big challenge due to their fragility and that technology has not been broadly commercialized.

Atomic Force Microscope (AFM ) images (in Tapping-Mode) shows that SWNTs are vertically assembled on polymer surface. The average height of the entrapped SWNTs is around 40 nm. The nanotubular features of the nanotubes on the surface significantly enhance the surface area to about 10,000 times greater than a blank surface. With the functionalized surface feature (-COOH groups) on the nanotubes, this technique will find broad wide application in immobilizing sensing molecules for DNA assays, protein analysis, and chemical compound and ion detection.

Advantages of this technique:

1. Vertical assembled single-walled carbon nanotubes on polymer matrix.
2. Surface area increased about 10,000 times.
3. Highly dense-COOH groups for chemically binding sensing molecules.
4. Versatile sensing platform.

####

About MicroDysis
MicroDysis designs and manufactures a wide variety of microfluidic devices and instrumentation. The Company focuses on enhancing test sensitivity using its patented micro-fabrication technology for embedding functionalized carbon nanotubes onto surfaces of channels and micro-wells.

For more information, please click here

Contacts:
Joseph Huang
MicroDysis, Inc.

Copyright © MicroDysis

If you have a comment, please Contact us.

Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.

Bookmark:
Delicious Digg Newsvine Google Yahoo Reddit Magnoliacom Furl Facebook

Related News Press

News and information

Three-dimensional graphene: Experiment at BESSY II shows that optical properties are tuneable May 24th, 2017

Leti to Demo 1st Wireless UNB Transceiver for ‘Massive Internet of Things’ at RFIC 2017 and IMS 2017: Leti Will also Present Three Papers & Two Workshops on 5G Communications IC Design, from RF to mm-Wave, During IMS 2017 and RFIC 2017 in Hawaii May 24th, 2017

GLOBALFOUNDRIES and Chengdu Partner to Expand FD-SOI Ecosystem in China: More than $100M investment to establish a center of excellence for FDXTM FD-SOI design May 23rd, 2017

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria: Rice, Ben-Gurion universities show laser-induced graphene kills bacteria, resists biofouling May 22nd, 2017

Chemistry

Stanford scientists use nanotechnology to boost the performance of key industrial catalyst May 18th, 2017

Sandia develops math techniques to improve computational efficiency in quantum chemistry May 5th, 2017

Metal nanoparticles induced visible-light photocatalysis: Mechanisms, applications, ways of promoting catalytic activity and outlook April 27th, 2017

Shedding light on the absorption of light by titanium dioxide April 14th, 2017

Nanotubes/Buckyballs/Fullerenes

Fed grant backs nanofiber development: Rice University joins Department of Energy 'Next Generation Machines' initiative May 10th, 2017

Nanotubes that build themselves April 14th, 2017

Intertronics introduce new nanoparticle deagglomeration technology March 15th, 2017

Boron atoms stretch out, gain new powers: Rice University simulations demonstrate 1-D material's stiffness, electrical versatility January 26th, 2017

Sensors

'Hot' electrons don't mind the gap: Rice University scientists find nanogaps in plasmonic gold wires enhance voltage when excited May 8th, 2017

Better living through pressure: Functional nanomaterials made easy April 19th, 2017

A Sensitive And Dynamic Tactile Sensor Read more from Asian Scientist Magazine at: https://www.asianscientist.com/2017/04/tech/tactile-3d-active-matrix-sensor/ April 18th, 2017

AIM Photonics Presents Cutting-Edge Integrated Photonics Technology Developments to Packed House at OFC 2017, the Optical Networking and Communication Conference & Exhibition April 11th, 2017

Discoveries

Three-dimensional graphene: Experiment at BESSY II shows that optical properties are tuneable May 24th, 2017

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria: Rice, Ben-Gurion universities show laser-induced graphene kills bacteria, resists biofouling May 22nd, 2017

Sensors detect disease markers in breath May 19th, 2017

Graphene-nanotube hybrid boosts lithium metal batteries: Rice University prototypes store 3 times the energy of lithium-ion batteries May 19th, 2017

Announcements

Three-dimensional graphene: Experiment at BESSY II shows that optical properties are tuneable May 24th, 2017

Leti to Demo 1st Wireless UNB Transceiver for ‘Massive Internet of Things’ at RFIC 2017 and IMS 2017: Leti Will also Present Three Papers & Two Workshops on 5G Communications IC Design, from RF to mm-Wave, During IMS 2017 and RFIC 2017 in Hawaii May 24th, 2017

GLOBALFOUNDRIES and Chengdu Partner to Expand FD-SOI Ecosystem in China: More than $100M investment to establish a center of excellence for FDXTM FD-SOI design May 23rd, 2017

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria: Rice, Ben-Gurion universities show laser-induced graphene kills bacteria, resists biofouling May 22nd, 2017

Homeland Security

Nanosensors on the alert for terrorist threats: Scientists interested in the prospects of gas sensors based on binary metal oxide nanocomposites November 5th, 2016

Nanobionic spinach plants can detect explosives: After sensing dangerous chemicals, the carbon-nanotube-enhanced plants send an alert November 2nd, 2016

Notre Dame researchers find transition point in semiconductor nanomaterials September 6th, 2016

Down to the wire: ONR researchers and new bacteria August 18th, 2016

Military

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria: Rice, Ben-Gurion universities show laser-induced graphene kills bacteria, resists biofouling May 22nd, 2017

Graphene-nanotube hybrid boosts lithium metal batteries: Rice University prototypes store 3 times the energy of lithium-ion batteries May 19th, 2017

Gas gives laser-induced graphene super properties: Rice University study shows inexpensive material can be superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic May 15th, 2017

'Hot' electrons don't mind the gap: Rice University scientists find nanogaps in plasmonic gold wires enhance voltage when excited May 8th, 2017

NanoNews-Digest
The latest news from around the world, FREE



  Premium Products
NanoNews-Custom
Only the news you want to read!
 Learn More
NanoTech-Transfer
University Technology Transfer & Patents
 Learn More
NanoStrategies
Full-service, expert consulting
 Learn More











ASP
Nanotechnology Now Featured Books




NNN

The Hunger Project